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painting wood

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  • Brian Tychonski
    Personally I don t like painting my work. I would rather use quality wood and let the natural beauty show through. However, if I were to make a chest or
    Message 1 of 4 , May 17 6:13 PM
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      Personally I don't like painting my work.  I would rather use quality wood and let the natural beauty show through.  However, if I were to make a chest or chair for an SCA competition and the model I was using was painted, then I would paint it.  If I was making an original chair based off of period examples and techniques then I could choose to paint or not to paint.
      Trevor
       
       
      Well folks don't feel bad if you have to paint nice wood to make it more period. While I was managing the Tandy Store in Wilmington,DE, they were replicating the Kalmar Nyckel in the Wilmington harbor. The Kalmar Nyckel was the ship that Peter Stuyvesant came to the new world in from Europe in the early 1600s. I sold them the leather that they were using on the rigging and designed the sheath for the deck knife and marlin spikes for the crew. One of the volunteer carpenters was telling me that they had built this thing out of all of this beautiful teak, mahogany and purple heart among other woods, and had then been forced to paint over all of it. He was not happy about it, but did what he was told.
       
      Brian Broadaxe
    • Ceara ni Neill
      I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to the 1700 s. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600? --Ceara
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 12, 2010
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        I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to the 1700's. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600?
        --Ceara
      • erik_mage
        I believe you can use Verselle as an example. I do many of the old world finishes and have an old book that describes How to do ancient wood graining.
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 15, 2010
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          I believe you can use Verselle as an example.
          I do many of the old world finishes and have an old book that describes How to do ancient wood graining. published in the 1950's.

          Okay here it is the 'Salle de spectacle' was addorned with marblized wood or gilded wood.
          Since wood graining is the easier of the two to do it is only logical to assuem the artist that practiced Marblizing was also an expert at wood graining . Both of which are Faux (french) finish.

          Thanks to Louis and Marrie we have lots of cool things. Like the carousel 1600's

          ERIK mage

          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Ceara ni Neill <ceara@...> wrote:
          >
          > I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to
          > the 1700's. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600?
          > --Ceara
          >
        • Ceara ni Neill
          thanks!
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 15, 2010
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            thanks!

            On Sun, Aug 15, 2010 at 9:10 PM, erik_mage <dragonwyck@...> wrote:
             

            I believe you can use Verselle as an example.
            I do many of the old world finishes and have an old book that describes How to do ancient wood graining. published in the 1950's.

            Okay here it is the 'Salle de spectacle' was addorned with marblized wood or gilded wood.
            Since wood graining is the easier of the two to do it is only logical to assuem the artist that practiced Marblizing was also an expert at wood graining . Both of which are Faux (french) finish.

            Thanks to Louis and Marrie we have lots of cool things. Like the carousel 1600's

            ERIK mage



            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Ceara ni Neill <ceara@...> wrote:
            >
            > I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to
            > the 1700's. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600?
            > --Ceara
            >


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