Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

period turners polish?

Expand Messages
  • gameresearch
    In his book Mechanick Exercises Moxon mentions turners polishing hardwood with salad oyl Hard wood they polish with beez-wax, viz. by holding bees-wax
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 9 6:22 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      In his book "Mechanick Exercises" Moxon mentions turners polishing
      hardwood with "salad oyl"

      "Hard wood they polish with beez-wax, viz. by holding bees-wax against
      it, till it have sufficiently toucht it all over; and press it hard
      into it by hard the edge of a flat piece of hard wood made sizable and
      suitable to the work made sizable and suitable to the work the work
      upon, as the work is going about. Then they set a gloss on it with a
      very dry woolen rag, lightly smeared with salad oyl."

      Any thoughts on what kind of salad oil? Olive oil was my guess? or
      were there other oils that might have been used in England or places
      where olive oil would have to be imported?

      Chas
      --
      MacGregor Historic Games
      http://historicgames.com
    • Craig Robert Pierpont
      Chas Olive oil will polymerize to build a finish. Most modern salad oils are mostly corn oil and will not. They will stay soft. Corn oil, by the way, is a
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 10 7:44 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Chas
           Olive oil will "polymerize" to build a finish. Most modern "salad oils" are mostly corn oil and will not. They will stay soft. Corn oil, by the way, is a "new world" item and not likley to have been much available before 1600.
         
        Craig Robert

        medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2005 13:22:09 -0000
        From: "gameresearch"
        Subject: period turners polish?


        In his book "Mechanick Exercises" Moxon mentions turners polishing
        hardwood with "salad oyl"

        "Hard wood they polish with beez-wax, viz. by holding bees-wax against
        it, till it have sufficiently toucht it all over; and press it hard
        into it by hard the edge of a flat piece of hard wood made sizable and
        suitable to the work made sizable and suitable to the work the work
        upon, as the work is going about. Then they set a gloss on it with a
        very dry woolen rag, lightly smeared with salad oyl."

        Any thoughts on what kind of salad oil? Olive oil was my guess? or
        were there other oils that might have been used in England or places
        where olive oil would have to be imported?

        Chas
        --
        MacGregor Historic Games
        http://historicgames.com


        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!

      • Joseph Hayes
        ... Gerard s Herbal says, Lettuce maketh a pleasant sallad, being eaten raw with vineger, oyle, and a little salt. It must have been commmon enought that
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 11 5:59 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          --- gameresearch <charles@...> wrote:
          > In his book "Mechanick Exercises" Moxon mentions turners polishing
          > hardwood with "salad oyl"
          >
          > Any thoughts on what kind of salad oil?

          Gerard's Herbal says, "Lettuce maketh a pleasant sallad, being eaten
          raw with vineger, oyle, and a little salt." It must have been commmon
          enought that specificaion wasn't required.

          You're probably right about the olive oil, but it might not hurt to
          check with a cooking Laurel.

          Ulrich




          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!
          http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/
        • Tom Rettie
          ... Walnut oil is another oxidizing oil that was used both as a food oil and in artists preparations. You can usually find it in art supply stores and in some
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 11 6:10 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
            <von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:

            > You're probably right about the olive oil, but it might not hurt to
            > check with a cooking Laurel.

            Walnut oil is another oxidizing oil that was used both as a food oil
            and in artists' preparations. You can usually find it in art supply
            stores and in some grocery and gourmet markets.

            Fin
          • Ralph Lindberg
            ... ... and I would think it would work well. However I doubt it s the oil refured to as salad oil . I have a mug almost ready for finish work, I will have to
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 11 6:55 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Rettie" <tom@h...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
              > <von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:
              >
              > > You're probably right about the olive oil, but it might not hurt to
              > > check with a cooking Laurel.
              >
              > Walnut oil is another oxidizing oil that was used both as a food oil
              > and in artists' preparations. You can usually find it in art supply
              > stores and in some grocery and gourmet markets.
              >
              ... and I would think it would work well. However I doubt it's the
              oil refured to as "salad oil".
              I have a mug almost ready for finish work, I will have to "borrow"
              some of the olive oil from the house and try.

              TTFN
              Ralg
              AnTir
            • Arthur Slaughter
              IN combination with beeswax it makes a very nice finish for turned ware. I use it a lot. Finn ...
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 11 10:21 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                IN combination with beeswax it makes a very nice finish for turned ware. I
                use it a lot.
                Finn
                >From: "Tom Rettie" <tom@...>
                >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: period turners polish?
                >Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2005 13:10:11 -0000
                >
                >
                >--- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
                ><von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:
                >
                > > You're probably right about the olive oil, but it might not hurt to
                > > check with a cooking Laurel.
                >
                >Walnut oil is another oxidizing oil that was used both as a food oil
                >and in artists' preparations. You can usually find it in art supply
                >stores and in some grocery and gourmet markets.
                >
                >Fin
                >
                >
                >

                _________________________________________________________________
                Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE!
                http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
              • Tim Bray
                ... Cheers, Colin
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 11 10:44 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  I checked with a culinary Laurel who did some reading:

                  M. Toussaint-Samat in History of Food discusses olive oil in antiquity and in the Mediterranean in period, and according to her King Rene didn t care for it for frying, etc but it was still used for salads.

                  She further says that the merchants of the low countries would adulterate the frying oil with poppyseed oil or linseed oil, and that olive oil demand decreased significantly durimg the MA, but resurged between late 15th and late 16th centuries.


                  Rape seed oil, according to Toussaint-Samat is traditiomal in eastern Europe, and mentioned in France as early as 1835 where it was used to lubricate machinery and feed cattle.

                  Walnut oil she csays was widely used in central france until the middle of the 19th century but she also points out that it doenst keep well and is expensive. King rene was supposed to be especially fond of it since he didn t like olive oil (which then supposes that s what most people had?)
                  Cheers,
                  Colin

                • msgilliandurham
                  What about for non-turned furniture? Flatware , I suppose you could call it Or is the key to this, that you apply the oil, then the beeswax, or the
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 11 2:13 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    What about for non-turned furniture? "Flatware", I suppose you could
                    call it <g>

                    Or is the key to this, that you apply the oil, then the beeswax, or
                    the combination of oil and wax, and then use the lathe to turn the
                    finished item while you hold the buffer to polish it? And that using
                    this method on "flatware" requires way too much elbow grease?

                    Thanks in advance,

                    Gillian Durham
                    (who is still repressing her impulse to fall back on ye olde
                    American Colonial repro cheat of Rit dye and shoe polish <g>)

                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur Slaughter"
                    <finnmacart@h...> wrote:
                    >
                    > IN combination with beeswax it makes a very nice finish for turned
                    ware. I
                    > use it a lot.
                    > Finn
                    > >From: "Tom Rettie" <tom@h...>
                    > >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    > >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    > >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: period turners polish?
                    > >Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2005 13:10:11 -0000
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >--- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
                    > ><von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > You're probably right about the olive oil, but it might not
                    hurt to
                    > > > check with a cooking Laurel.
                    > >
                    > >Walnut oil is another oxidizing oil that was used both as a food
                    oil
                    > >and in artists' preparations. You can usually find it in art
                    supply
                    > >stores and in some grocery and gourmet markets.
                    > >
                    > >Fin
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > _________________________________________________________________
                    > Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today -
                    it's FREE!
                    > http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
                  • Arthur Slaughter
                    My personal formula is roughly equal parts of walnut oil and beeswax melted together and applied to teh spinning bowl or what ever on teh lathe. Seems that
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 11 4:24 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      My personal formula is roughly equal parts of walnut oil and beeswax melted
                      together and applied to teh spinning bowl or what ever on teh lathe. Seems
                      that the oil helps to draw the wax deeper into the wood and the heat from
                      turning is also a help in that regard.
                      Finn
                      >From: "msgilliandurham" <msgilliandurham@...>
                      >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: period turners polish?
                      >Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2005 21:13:21 -0000
                      >
                      >
                      >What about for non-turned furniture? "Flatware", I suppose you could
                      >call it <g>
                      >
                      >Or is the key to this, that you apply the oil, then the beeswax, or
                      >the combination of oil and wax, and then use the lathe to turn the
                      >finished item while you hold the buffer to polish it? And that using
                      >this method on "flatware" requires way too much elbow grease?
                      >
                      >Thanks in advance,
                      >
                      >Gillian Durham
                      >(who is still repressing her impulse to fall back on ye olde
                      >American Colonial repro cheat of Rit dye and shoe polish <g>)
                      >
                      >--- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur Slaughter"
                      ><finnmacart@h...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > IN combination with beeswax it makes a very nice finish for turned
                      >ware. I
                      > > use it a lot.
                      > > Finn
                      > > >From: "Tom Rettie" <tom@h...>
                      > > >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      > > >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      > > >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: period turners polish?
                      > > >Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2005 13:10:11 -0000
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >--- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
                      > > ><von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > > You're probably right about the olive oil, but it might not
                      >hurt to
                      > > > > check with a cooking Laurel.
                      > > >
                      > > >Walnut oil is another oxidizing oil that was used both as a food
                      >oil
                      > > >and in artists' preparations. You can usually find it in art
                      >supply
                      > > >stores and in some grocery and gourmet markets.
                      > > >
                      > > >Fin
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > > _________________________________________________________________
                      > > Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today -
                      >it's FREE!
                      > > http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      _________________________________________________________________
                      FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar � get it now!
                      http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/
                    • Ralph Lindberg
                      ... Gillian, I don t think that using the lathe to hold the object would work well. What might work well is putting buffing wheels on the lathe (or drill, or
                      Message 10 of 10 , Apr 11 6:00 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
                        <msgilliandurham@y...> wrote:
                        >
                        > What about for non-turned furniture? "Flatware", I suppose you could
                        > call it <g>
                        >
                        > Or is the key to this, that you apply the oil, then the beeswax, or
                        > the combination of oil and wax, and then use the lathe to turn the
                        > finished item while you hold the buffer to polish it? And that using
                        > this method on "flatware" requires way too much elbow grease?
                        >

                        Gillian, I don't think that using the lathe to hold the object would
                        work well.
                        What might work well is putting buffing wheels on the lathe (or
                        drill, or grinder, or...) and then using that to obtain a similar type
                        result.

                        TTFN
                        Ralg
                        AnTir
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.