Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

rebuilding the workshop

Expand Messages
  • Talmoor
    I am looking at re stocking my tools. for a few reasons all of my tools are gone and I am working from scratch. What have you all found usefull or essential in
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 7 7:46 PM
      I am looking at re stocking my tools. for a few reasons all of my tools
      are gone and I am working from scratch. What have you all found usefull
      or essential in the shop? I am looking at hobby and around the house
      projects. Gear for my encampment and personal enjoyment. My current
      list is an entry level table saw, a 12" drill press with mortise
      attachemnt, a plunge router, a hand held jigsaw, a palm sander, and an
      assortment of clamps, bits, and blades. Any suggestions or thoughts?

      Alasdair
    • Arthur Slaughter
      If you can swing it a Planer and jointer sure save on lumber costs. Also on frustration trying to work with the wooden corkscrews that most lumber yards
      Message 2 of 25 , Apr 7 8:23 PM
        If you can swing it a Planer and jointer sure save on lumber costs. Also on
        frustration trying to work with the wooden corkscrews that most lumber yards
        stock.
        Finn
        >From: "Talmoor" <talmoor@...>
        >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] rebuilding the workshop
        >Date: Fri, 08 Apr 2005 02:46:26 -0000
        >
        >
        >I am looking at re stocking my tools. for a few reasons all of my tools
        >are gone and I am working from scratch. What have you all found usefull
        >or essential in the shop? I am looking at hobby and around the house
        >projects. Gear for my encampment and personal enjoyment. My current
        >list is an entry level table saw, a 12" drill press with mortise
        >attachemnt, a plunge router, a hand held jigsaw, a palm sander, and an
        >assortment of clamps, bits, and blades. Any suggestions or thoughts?
        >
        >Alasdair
        >
        >
        >
        >

        _________________________________________________________________
        Don�t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
        http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/
      • jim
        Hi, I would make sure that any tablesaw you get be able to use a stacked dado set. The Delta Unisaw tablesaw is my personal favorite. I prefer using an
        Message 3 of 25 , Apr 7 8:36 PM
          Hi,
          I would make sure that any tablesaw you get
          be able to use a stacked dado set. The Delta
          Unisaw tablesaw is my personal favorite. I
          prefer using an orbital disk sander to a palm
          sander, and an air powered one is even better.
          Router tables are nice, or make your own as your
          first shop project. Also good are band saw
          and a belt sander.

          smithur/jim

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Talmoor [mailto:talmoor@...]
          > Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2005 7:46 PM
          > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] rebuilding the workshop
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I am looking at re stocking my tools. for a few
          reasons all
          > of my tools
          > are gone and I am working from scratch. What have
          you all
          > found usefull
          > or essential in the shop? I am looking at hobby
          and around the house
          > projects. Gear for my encampment and personal
          enjoyment. My current
          > list is an entry level table saw, a 12" drill
          press with mortise
          > attachemnt, a plunge router, a hand held jigsaw, a
          palm
          > sander, and an
          > assortment of clamps, bits, and blades. Any
          suggestions or thoughts?
          >
          > Alasdair
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          > --------------------~-->
          > What would our lives be like without music, dance,
          and theater?
          > Donate or volunteer in the arts today at Network
          for Good!
          >
          http://us.click.yahoo.com/pkgkPB/SOnJAA/Zx0JAA/Lmiol
          B/TM
          > --------------------------------------------------
          ------------
          > ------~->
          >
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          > medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • James W. Pratt, Jr.
          3/8 reversable drill for drilling and screws, belt sander(for belt sander theory of wood working) and a band saw for cutting every thing from bones to brass.
          Message 4 of 25 , Apr 7 8:45 PM
            3/8 reversable drill for drilling and screws, belt sander(for belt sander
            theory of wood working) and a band saw for cutting every thing from bones to
            brass.

            James Cunningham

            >
            >
            > I am looking at re stocking my tools. for a few reasons all of my tools
            > are gone and I am working from scratch. What have you all found usefull
            > or essential in the shop? I am looking at hobby and around the house
            > projects. Gear for my encampment and personal enjoyment. My current
            > list is an entry level table saw, a 12" drill press with mortise
            > attachemnt, a plunge router, a hand held jigsaw, a palm sander, and an
            > assortment of clamps, bits, and blades. Any suggestions or thoughts?
            >
            > Alasdair
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Ralph Lindberg
            That s a big question. Obviously you are asking about power tools. Some thoughts. I modified my Grizzly TS so that the wings are also router tables (both
            Message 5 of 25 , Apr 8 7:20 AM
              That's a big question.

              Obviously you are asking about power tools.

              Some thoughts. I modified my Grizzly TS so that the wings are also
              router tables (both wings). That gives me a LARGE router table and I
              can have both routers rigger for different tasks.

              Don't get the Ryobi AP10 planner, I did and dumped it. I now have the
              Dewalt 12inch. Which brings up Vimes Law (again), buy the best tools
              you can afford to. Every time I have not followed that law, I have
              regreted it (and usually dumped the junk).

              If you have the room, consider the Jet or Delta Midi-Lathe. They are
              large enough to turn almost any SCA project, from mugs to 8 inch
              bowls. I talked my lady-wife into getting me one for Christmas last
              year, worst mistake I ever made. The extras (tools, centers,
              face-plates) have cost me more then she spent on the lathe.

              Oh ya, routers, 1/2 routers are not that much more then 1/4 inch. Buy
              1/2 each. I have two, a pluge and a fixed.

              Don't forget the handtools: a couple good planes, an inside and
              outside draw knife (nice for planning swords), good chisels, the list
              goes on and on

              That should keep your broke for, well, years.

              Ralg
              AnTir
            • Avery Austringer
              Be careful on the entry level table saw - a lot of times the low end table saws are less acurate than a circular saw, a straight edge and two clamps. I used
              Message 6 of 25 , Apr 8 8:41 AM
                Be careful on the "entry level" table saw - a lot of
                times the low end table saws are less acurate than a
                circular saw, a straight edge and two clamps. I used
                a Delta contractors saw for a while and didn't have
                too many complaints, but would recomend getting a
                package with a higher end fence.

                If you anticipate having more money to spend later,
                consider this: I saw a guy do some great work with a
                circular saw bolted to a piece of plywood and a table
                frame from salvaged scraps. His fence was a piece of
                wood on a double arm that he locked in place with a
                pair of quick clamps. I've heard tell of guys doing
                height adjustments on this kind of rig by mounting the
                saw on a piece of plywood that is attached to the
                tabke by a hinge and a single bolt (the bolt doubles
                as the adjustment point).

                Other thought - if a high end plane is on your list,
                look at e-bay in the collectables section. A common
                antique stanley plane is probably better than most of
                what's out there today.

                Also, get what you need to keep what you buy sharp!
                (See other posts by me on this subject.)

                Avery
              • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                ... Stay far away from delta s entry level saws.... they are best used as landfill... Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something
                Message 7 of 25 , Apr 8 2:28 PM
                  --- Avery Austringer <avery1415@...> wrote:
                  > Be careful on the "entry level" table saw - a lot of
                  > times the low end table saws are less acurate than a
                  > circular saw, a straight edge and two clamps. I
                  > used
                  > a Delta contractors saw for a while and didn't have
                  > too many complaints, but would recomend getting a
                  > package with a higher end fence.
                  >

                  Stay far away from delta's 'entry' level
                  saws....

                  they are best used as landfill...



                  Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                  Aude Aliquid Dignum
                  ' Dare Something Worthy '



                  __________________________________
                  Yahoo! Messenger
                  Show us what our next emoticon should look like. Join the fun.
                  http://www.advision.webevents.yahoo.com/emoticontest
                • Dan Baker
                  As far as a jointer, Hawk Woodworking makes a Jointability which will do most of the work for very little money. $349 for the 8 foot model. Joints with a
                  Message 8 of 25 , Apr 8 3:09 PM
                    As far as a jointer, Hawk Woodworking makes a "Jointability" which
                    will do most of the work for very little money. $349 for the 8 foot
                    model. Joints with a router. I am thinking about buying one.

                    Even cheaper, I have an 8 foot long sled with a straight edge for my
                    table saw for jointing a straight edge on rough lumber. Works just
                    fine, cost? some scrap wood and a couple of hold downs, about $15
                    bucks. I haven't used the jointer in a long long time, the sled does
                    a better job one straightening cuts due to its length. But it can't
                    do the final clean up cuts that a jointer can do.

                    Table saw, buy top of the line (within the limits of your budget). It
                    is cheaper to buy the higher quality one then to buy the cheap one and
                    not be happy with it. This is true of most tools. I have a Jet and I
                    am happy with it. I have heard a lot of good stuff about Grizzly,
                    some day I'll have to buy one.

                    My Ryobi AP12 is a decent, not great planer, but I don't think they
                    make the AP10 or AP12 anymore. I have only had to replace a belt once
                    in 5 years for maintainence a (and a few blades). That was because I
                    screwed up, not the machine. but, for quality If I had the money I
                    would get a spiral blade planer or one of the new carbide cutter
                    planers. The carbide ones have dozens of small 4 sided cutters and
                    when they get dull, you rotate them, you only replace them after using
                    all 4 sides.


                    -Rhys

                    On Apr 8, 2005 5:28 PM, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > --- Avery Austringer <avery1415@...> wrote:
                    > > Be careful on the "entry level" table saw - a lot of
                    > > times the low end table saws are less acurate than a
                    > > circular saw, a straight edge and two clamps. I
                    > > used
                    > > a Delta contractors saw for a while and didn't have
                    > > too many complaints, but would recomend getting a
                    > > package with a higher end fence.
                    > >
                    >
                    > Stay far away from delta's 'entry' level
                    > saws....
                    >
                    > they are best used as landfill...
                    >
                    > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                    >
                    > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                    > ' Dare Something Worthy '
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________
                    > Yahoo! Messenger
                    > Show us what our next emoticon should look like. Join the fun.
                    > http://www.advision.webevents.yahoo.com/emoticontest
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    --
                    -Rhys
                  • Arthur Slaughter
                    Our landfill won t take em Finn ... _________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download
                    Message 9 of 25 , Apr 8 4:17 PM
                      Our landfill won't take em
                      Finn

                      >From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...>
                      >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] RE: rebuilding the workshop
                      >Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 14:28:10 -0700 (PDT)
                      >
                      >
                      >--- Avery Austringer <avery1415@...> wrote:
                      > > Be careful on the "entry level" table saw - a lot of
                      > > times the low end table saws are less acurate than a
                      > > circular saw, a straight edge and two clamps. I
                      > > used
                      > > a Delta contractors saw for a while and didn't have
                      > > too many complaints, but would recomend getting a
                      > > package with a higher end fence.
                      > >
                      >
                      >Stay far away from delta's 'entry' level
                      >saws....
                      >
                      > they are best used as landfill...
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                      >
                      > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                      > ' Dare Something Worthy '
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >__________________________________
                      >Yahoo! Messenger
                      >Show us what our next emoticon should look like. Join the fun.
                      >http://www.advision.webevents.yahoo.com/emoticontest

                      _________________________________________________________________
                      Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE!
                      http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
                    • toomuch87505
                      Not that being a girl has anything to do with having a workshop, BUT, when I started purchasing tools for woodworking, I went out and bought everything I
                      Message 10 of 25 , Apr 8 8:49 PM
                        Not that being a girl has anything to do with having a workshop,
                        BUT, when I started purchasing tools for woodworking, I went out and
                        bought everything I thought I needed. I do have a very nice table
                        saw, grinder, router and router table, two circular saws and
                        something called a all-in-one cutting tool that I have not used yet
                        due to lack of knowledge.

                        I am able to do just about anything I need to do with a jig saw,
                        reversible drill, palm sander a dremel, assorted hand tools, saw,
                        hammer, chisel set and clamps. The rest of the tools will have to
                        sit there until I take a woodworking class and find out how to use
                        them.

                        Theresa

                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Talmoor" <talmoor@y...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > I am looking at re stocking my tools. for a few reasons all of my
                        tools
                        > are gone and I am working from scratch. What have you all found
                        usefull
                        > or essential in the shop? I am looking at hobby and around the
                        house
                        > projects. Gear for my encampment and personal enjoyment. My
                        current
                        > list is an entry level table saw, a 12" drill press with mortise
                        > attachemnt, a plunge router, a hand held jigsaw, a palm sander,
                        and an
                        > assortment of clamps, bits, and blades. Any suggestions or
                        thoughts?
                        >
                        > Alasdair
                      • Ralph Lindberg
                        ... I have a lot of faith in the quality per dollar in Griz. Next is probably a large Grizzly lathe Ralg
                        Message 11 of 25 , Apr 8 9:54 PM
                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Dan Baker <LordRhys@g...> wrote:
                          ...
                          > am happy with it. I have heard a lot of good stuff about Grizzly,
                          > some day I'll have to buy one.
                          >
                          I have a lot of faith in the quality per dollar in Griz. Next is
                          probably a large Grizzly lathe

                          Ralg
                        • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                          ... The rest of the ... Don t waste money buying tools you don t know how to use, unless you have a specific plan for learning or a specific use for them that
                          Message 12 of 25 , Apr 9 4:24 AM
                            --- toomuch87505 <too_be_free@...> wrote:
                            >
                            The rest of the
                            > tools will have to
                            > sit there until I take a woodworking class and find
                            > out how to use
                            > them.
                            >
                            > Theresa>


                            Don't waste money buying tools you
                            don't know how to use, unless you
                            have a specific plan for learning
                            or a specific use for them that some
                            other tool you already have cannot do.

                            But expand your tools and learn your skills
                            at the same time....It's the 'waste'
                            part that is important to stay in control of.


                            ( who advised you to get the
                            'all in one' cutting tool?...
                            just curious... )

                            You end up with enough tools that
                            you thought would be useful at the
                            time without effort anyway.

                            There is a magazine called Woodsmith
                            ( I think ) that has a series of projects,
                            each a little bigger than the previous one,
                            than build on the techniques from the previous
                            project. While I don't always like the
                            projects they pick, I like the way that
                            they group them together.



                            Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                            Aude Aliquid Dignum
                            ' Dare Something Worthy '



                            __________________________________
                            Do you Yahoo!?
                            Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!
                            http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/
                          • Tim Bray
                            Following up on what Conal said - a really good way to approach this is to start with the first project on your list, or the first three, or whatever; figure
                            Message 13 of 25 , Apr 9 6:40 AM
                              Following up on what Conal said - a really good way to approach this is to start with the first project on your list, or the first three, or whatever; figure out what tools you need for those specific projects, and buy them.  Build the projects.  Then go on to the next project.  Buy tools as you need them, rather than buying tools and then figuring out what to do with them.

                              The first thing you will need is a bench; the most essential tool in the shop.

                              I would urge you to consider starting with hand tools and adding power tools only as needed to speed up certain tasks.   If this is a hobby, you may find you do not need the power tools after all, and you won't miss the howling racket or the unhealthy dust.   Hand saws, planes, chisels, a brace and spoon bits, some clamps, and you are ready to start building medieval furniture.  Hand planing is a hell of a lot more fun than using a power jointer and planer, and for one-off projects it is probably no slower once you get the hang of it. 

                              Once you make the leap to power tools, be sure to include dust collection.  There's no reason to spew that damn dust all over everything any more; effective dust collection is cheap now.  Less than $200 gets you a 1HP roll-around DC with 1 micron filter bags (very important), good enough to start with.  I can't emphasize this enough - get a dust collector, and use it!   Don't buy any random-orbit sander without built-in dust collection (the Bosch cartridge system seems to work the best), and consider making yourself a downdraft sanding table anyway.  ROSs create a lot of very fine dust that goes deep into your lungs; apart from the cancer risk, many people are developing severe allergies and have to quit woodworking as a result.  This is avoidable!

                              Cheers,
                              Colin


                              Albion Works
                              Furniture and Accessories
                              For the Medievalist!
                            • toomuch87505
                              I did buy these tools with specific projects in mind. However, when I set them up in my workshop, I couldn t figure out how to put in a blade or how to guide
                              Message 14 of 25 , Apr 9 9:03 AM
                                I did buy these tools with specific projects in mind. However, when
                                I set them up in my workshop, I couldn't figure out how to put in a
                                blade or how to guide a router. They are sitting there as are the
                                projects I wanted to make as well.

                                I would rather have them sit there until I am able to safely use
                                them, then to try to figure them out and lose a finger or an eye.

                                I do use my jig saw, drill and sander regularly and have made
                                several break down chairs, tables and chests. All I really need is
                                some instructions on the rest of the tools and I should be ok.


                                Theresa

                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Tim Bray <tbray@m...> wrote:
                                > Following up on what Conal said - a really good way to approach
                                this is to
                                > start with the first project on your list, or the first three, or
                                whatever;
                                > figure out what tools you need for those specific projects, and
                                buy
                                > them. Build the projects. Then go on to the next project. Buy
                                tools as
                                > you need them, rather than buying tools and then figuring out what
                                to do
                                > with them.
                                >
                                > The first thing you will need is a bench; the most essential tool
                                in the shop.
                                >
                                > I would urge you to consider starting with hand tools and adding
                                power
                                > tools only as needed to speed up certain tasks. If this is a
                                hobby, you
                                > may find you do not need the power tools after all, and you won't
                                miss the
                                > howling racket or the unhealthy dust. Hand saws, planes,
                                chisels, a brace
                                > and spoon bits, some clamps, and you are ready to start building
                                medieval
                                > furniture. Hand planing is a hell of a lot more fun than using a
                                power
                                > jointer and planer, and for one-off projects it is probably no
                                slower once
                                > you get the hang of it.
                                >
                                > Once you make the leap to power tools, be sure to include dust
                                > collection. There's no reason to spew that damn dust all over
                                everything
                                > any more; effective dust collection is cheap now. Less than $200
                                gets you
                                > a 1HP roll-around DC with 1 micron filter bags (very important),
                                good
                                > enough to start with. I can't emphasize this enough - get a dust
                                > collector, and use it! Don't buy any random-orbit sander without
                                built-in
                                > dust collection (the Bosch cartridge system seems to work the
                                best), and
                                > consider making yourself a downdraft sanding table anyway. ROSs
                                create a
                                > lot of very fine dust that goes deep into your lungs; apart from
                                the cancer
                                > risk, many people are developing severe allergies and have to quit
                                > woodworking as a result. This is avoidable!
                                >
                                > Cheers,
                                > Colin
                                >
                                >
                                > Albion Works
                                > Furniture and Accessories
                                > For the Medievalist!
                                > http://www.albionworks.net
                                > http://www.albionworks.com
                              • Tim Bray
                                Theresa, my message was actually directed toward Alasdair, who started this thread. Sorry, I should have made that clear! You should be able to find
                                Message 15 of 25 , Apr 9 1:41 PM
                                  Theresa, my message was actually directed toward Alasdair, who started this thread.  Sorry, I should have made that clear!

                                  You should be able to find instruction for your tools in a number of places:

                                  1.  The owner's manual is the first place to look.  But often these are either inadequate, or missing, so...
                                  2.  There are any number of after-market books on table saws and routers.  Some of them are better than others.  Try looking through the Amazon reviews to see which are recommended.
                                  3.  Likewise there are quite a number of videos available now.
                                  4.  Ideally, you might be able to take a class or attend a workshop in your area.  Woodcraft stores, community colleges, and arts centers are good places to look.

                                  You are certainly wise to be cautious; table saws and routers are very dangerous tools if used incorrectly.  I was very lucky when I started using these tools - my mistakes did not cause serious injuries, but made me stop and think. 

                                  Cheers,
                                  Colin


                                  Albion Works
                                  Furniture and Accessories
                                  For the Medievalist!
                                • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                                  Of the injuries I have seen on wood workers... the table saw and shaper(router mounted in a table) took parts off that never grew back!! James Cunningham Who
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Apr 9 8:43 PM
                                    Of the injuries I have seen on wood workers... the table saw and shaper(router mounted in a table) took parts off that never grew back!!
                                     
                                    James Cunningham
                                    Who has scarres and scares

                                    You are certainly wise to be cautious; table saws and routers are very dangerous tools if used incorrectly.  I was very lucky when I started using these tools - my mistakes did not cause serious injuries, but made me stop and think. 
                                  • John LaTorre
                                    ... There used to be a guy on the internet who had copies of many out-of-production power tools, and he would copy them off for you for pretty much the cost of
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Apr 10 12:38 PM
                                      Sir Colin wrote:

                                      > You should be able to find instruction for your tools in a number
                                      > of places:
                                      >
                                      > 1. The owner's manual is the first place to look. But often these are
                                      > either inadequate, or missing, so...

                                      There used to be a guy on the internet who had copies of many
                                      out-of-production power tools, and he would copy them off for you for pretty
                                      much the cost of copying and postage. If anybody's interested, I'll see if I
                                      can track him down again.

                                      Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)

                                      >
                                    • Arthur Slaughter
                                      If it s not too much trouble. I surely would be interestted having inherited several older tools lacking manuals. Finn ...
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Apr 10 8:12 PM
                                        If it's not too much trouble. I surely would be interestted having inherited
                                        several older tools lacking manuals.
                                        Finn

                                        >From: "John LaTorre" <jlatorre@...>
                                        >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                        >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                        >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] RE: rebuilding the workshop
                                        >Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2005 12:38:19 -0700
                                        >
                                        >Sir Colin wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > You should be able to find instruction for your tools in a number
                                        > > of places:
                                        > >
                                        > > 1. The owner's manual is the first place to look. But often these are
                                        > > either inadequate, or missing, so...
                                        >
                                        >There used to be a guy on the internet who had copies of many
                                        >out-of-production power tools, and he would copy them off for you for
                                        >pretty
                                        >much the cost of copying and postage. If anybody's interested, I'll see if
                                        >I
                                        >can track him down again.
                                        >
                                        >Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
                                        >
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        >

                                        _________________________________________________________________
                                        Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE!
                                        http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
                                      • Ralph Lindberg
                                        ... everything ... gets you ... built-in ... and ... create a ... cancer ... Excellent advise. I have a small Delta two-stage, with a large hood. The hood goes
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Apr 11 6:43 AM
                                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Tim Bray <tbray@m...> wrote:
                                          >

                                          > Once you make the leap to power tools, be sure to include dust
                                          > collection. There's no reason to spew that damn dust all over
                                          everything
                                          > any more; effective dust collection is cheap now. Less than $200
                                          gets you
                                          > a 1HP roll-around DC with 1 micron filter bags (very important), good
                                          > enough to start with. I can't emphasize this enough - get a dust
                                          > collector, and use it! Don't buy any random-orbit sander without
                                          built-in
                                          > dust collection (the Bosch cartridge system seems to work the best),
                                          and
                                          > consider making yourself a downdraft sanding table anyway. ROSs
                                          create a
                                          > lot of very fine dust that goes deep into your lungs; apart from the
                                          cancer
                                          > risk, many people are developing severe allergies and have to quit
                                          > woodworking as a result. This is avoidable!
                                          >
                                          Excellent advise. I have a small Delta two-stage, with a large hood.
                                          The hood goes next to the sanding station, or the lathe, or... and
                                          almost all that dust goes straight in.
                                          However, I find the table-saw doesn't collect as well, so I also
                                          have a whole-shop air-filter (Delta, but that's just cause it was on
                                          sale).
                                          Dust==bad

                                          TTFN
                                          Ralg
                                          AnTir
                                        • Ralph Lindberg
                                          I just recalled the following shop lay-out tool from the Grizzly web-site. It only has generic objects (benchs, etc) and Grizzly tools. But since most Grizzly
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Apr 11 9:04 AM
                                            I just recalled the following shop lay-out tool from the Grizzly
                                            web-site. It only has generic objects (benchs, etc) and Grizzly tools.
                                            But since most Grizzly tools have the same foot-print as most
                                            Delta/Jet/etc tools. It still works

                                            Enjoy
                                            http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner.cfm?

                                            TTFN
                                            Ralg
                                            AnTir
                                          • John LaTorre
                                            ... Well, I can t find that information anymore, but here s a link that may help: http://www.oldwwmachines.com/ --Johann
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Apr 11 12:35 PM
                                              Finn wrote:

                                              >
                                              > If it's not too much trouble. I surely would be interestted
                                              > having inherited
                                              > several older tools lacking manuals.

                                              Well, I can't find that information anymore, but here's a link that may
                                              help:

                                              http://www.oldwwmachines.com/

                                              --Johann
                                            • Arthur Slaughter
                                              My thanks for your efforts. I can definately use the site you posted. Finn Mac Art ... _________________________________________________________________
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Apr 11 1:50 PM
                                                My thanks for your efforts. I can definately use the site you posted.
                                                Finn Mac Art

                                                >From: "John LaTorre" <jlatorre@...>
                                                >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                                >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                                >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] RE: rebuilding the workshop
                                                >Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2005 12:35:56 -0700
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >Finn wrote:
                                                >
                                                > >
                                                > > If it's not too much trouble. I surely would be interestted
                                                > > having inherited
                                                > > several older tools lacking manuals.
                                                >
                                                >Well, I can't find that information anymore, but here's a link that may
                                                >help:
                                                >
                                                >http://www.oldwwmachines.com/
                                                >
                                                >--Johann
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >

                                                _________________________________________________________________
                                                Don�t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
                                                http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/
                                              • Bill McNutt
                                                Harken, hear, and heed. If it is lore of old power tools ye need, I can direct ye. But beware, for this way lies danger. The gentles I am sending you to have
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Apr 17 5:33 PM
                                                  Harken, hear, and heed.

                                                  If it is lore of old power tools ye need, I can direct ye.

                                                  But beware, for this way lies danger. The gentles I am sending you to
                                                  have lost their way.

                                                  They used to be woodworkers, but the passion for "old arn" bites without
                                                  warning, and bites deep. Oh, certes, occasionally one of these lads will
                                                  remember why we MAKE sawdust, and will turn out a decent piece, but they
                                                  are far happier re-wiring switches and restoring old equipment.

                                                  They were very helpful to me in getting an old 6" jointer back into
                                                  working order not too far back. And I'm looking at re-wiring my wife's
                                                  grandfather's industrial Tannewitz bandsaw.

                                                  But I can quit any time I want.

                                                  Hie thee to www.owwm.com. They call this the Mothersite, wherein old
                                                  manuals are scanned and stored. It's open to the public at no cost.
                                                  You can also join the discussion list.

                                                  Just don't say I didn't warn you.

                                                  Master Will
                                                  http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood


                                                  -----Original Message-----
                                                  From: Arthur Slaughter [mailto:finnmacart@...]
                                                  Sent: Sunday, April 10, 2005 11:12 PM
                                                  To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] RE: rebuilding the workshop


                                                  If it's not too much trouble. I surely would be interestted having
                                                  inherited
                                                  several older tools lacking manuals.
                                                  Finn

                                                  >From: "John LaTorre" <jlatorre@...>
                                                  >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                                  >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                                  >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] RE: rebuilding the workshop
                                                  >Date: Sun, 10 Apr 2005 12:38:19 -0700
                                                  >
                                                  >Sir Colin wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > > You should be able to find instruction for your tools in a number
                                                  > > of places:
                                                  > >
                                                  > > 1. The owner's manual is the first place to look. But often these
                                                  are
                                                  > > either inadequate, or missing, so...
                                                  >
                                                  >There used to be a guy on the internet who had copies of many
                                                  >out-of-production power tools, and he would copy them off for you for
                                                  >pretty
                                                  >much the cost of copying and postage. If anybody's interested, I'll see
                                                  if
                                                  >I
                                                  >can track him down again.
                                                  >
                                                  >Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
                                                  >
                                                  > >
                                                  >
                                                  >

                                                  _________________________________________________________________
                                                  Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's
                                                  FREE!
                                                  http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/




                                                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                                                • Arthur Slaughter
                                                  Most Kind and Generous Master Will. Thanks from teh bottom of my pillaging viking heart! THL Finn Mac Art In Service to the Griffon ...
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Apr 17 8:16 PM
                                                    Most Kind and Generous Master Will.
                                                    Thanks from teh bottom of my pillaging viking heart!
                                                    THL Finn Mac Art
                                                    In Service to the Griffon

                                                    >From: "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@...>
                                                    >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                                    >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                                    >Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] RE: rebuilding the workshop
                                                    >Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 20:33:06 -0400
                                                    >
                                                    >Harken, hear, and heed.
                                                    >
                                                    >If it is lore of old power tools ye need, I can direct ye.
                                                    >
                                                    >But beware, for this way lies danger. The gentles I am sending you to
                                                    >have lost their way.
                                                    >
                                                    >They used to be woodworkers, but the passion for "old arn" bites without
                                                    >warning, and bites deep. Oh, certes, occasionally one of these lads will
                                                    >remember why we MAKE sawdust, and will turn out a decent piece, but they
                                                    >are far happier re-wiring switches and restoring old equipment.
                                                    >
                                                    >They were very helpful to me in getting an old 6" jointer back into
                                                    >working order not too far back. And I'm looking at re-wiring my wife's
                                                    >grandfather's industrial Tannewitz bandsaw.
                                                    >
                                                    >But I can quit any time I want.
                                                    >
                                                    >Hie thee to www.owwm.com. They call this the Mothersite, wherein old
                                                    >manuals are scanned and stored. It's open to the public at no cost.
                                                    >You can also join the discussion list.
                                                    >
                                                    >Just don't say I didn't warn you.
                                                    >
                                                    >Master Will
                                                    >http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood
                                                    >
                                                    >

                                                    _________________________________________________________________
                                                    Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE!
                                                    http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
                                                  • paul
                                                    While I love old power tools, My newest toy is an old hand crank drill press, I just need to find a post to mount it on. My blacksmiting buddy from down the
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , Apr 22 4:13 PM
                                                      While I love old power tools, My newest toy is an old hand crank drill
                                                      press, I just need to find a post to mount it on. My blacksmiting buddy
                                                      from down the block keeps offering to let me put it up in her forge room
                                                      but somehow I just don't trust her.

                                                      Paul

                                                      Bill McNutt wrote:

                                                      >Harken, hear, and heed.
                                                      >
                                                      >If it is lore of old power tools ye need, I can direct ye.
                                                      >
                                                      >But beware, for this way lies danger. The gentles I am sending you to
                                                      >have lost their way.
                                                      >
                                                      >They used to be woodworkers, but the passion for "old arn" bites without
                                                      >warning, and bites deep. Oh, certes, occasionally one of these lads will
                                                      >remember why we MAKE sawdust, and will turn out a decent piece, but they
                                                      >are far happier re-wiring switches and restoring old equipment.
                                                      >
                                                      >They were very helpful to me in getting an old 6" jointer back into
                                                      >working order not too far back. And I'm looking at re-wiring my wife's
                                                      >grandfather's industrial Tannewitz bandsaw.
                                                      >
                                                      >But I can quit any time I want.
                                                      >
                                                      >Hie thee to www.owwm.com. They call this the Mothersite, wherein old
                                                      >manuals are scanned and stored. It's open to the public at no cost.
                                                      >You can also join the discussion list.
                                                      >
                                                      >Just don't say I didn't warn you.
                                                      >
                                                      >Master Will
                                                      >http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.