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Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Turning Green Wood

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  • jrwinkler@msn.com
    Damn. I got ripped. paid RETAIL!!! Chas. ... Bear
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2003
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      Damn… I got ripped…  paid RETAIL!!!
       
      Chas.
       

      >> Half/price books has copys of this book. I paid $8.99 for my
      copy. <<
      Bear
       
       
    • kjworz@comcast.net
      In my backyard there is a horsetrough filled with water and White Oak. I would not hesitate to put ANY diffuse porous wood in there. Hickory, Ash, etc. I
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 3, 2004
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        In my backyard there is a horsetrough filled with water and White Oak. I would not hesitate to put ANY diffuse porous wood in there. Hickory, Ash, etc. I have no experience with non-diffuse porous woods (maple, beech, etc.), but I also have no reason to expect them NOT to work out fine, too.

        I try to make sure that the wood is completely covered by water. If an edge is exposed to air it oxidizes and turns black. It doesn't float much so don't worry about weighing stuff down. The wood only peaks out of the water when the water level drops and the pile is higher than the depth.

        I keep it covered to keep leaves and bird poop out, and also to slow evaporation.

        On occasion I have put in a part of one of those anti-mosquito donuts that people throw into unused pools. I only put in a small amount of insecticide because I don't have a full sized pool full of water and wood.

        John Alexander of www.greenwoodworking.com has a hot-tub size tank full of wood. He says some of it has been in for 25 years. He's the one I copied from.

        It's important to get the bark off. The wood is in there in riven billets. I chopped off the pith and most of the sap wood, also. So only wood I will use is in the water.

        Working wet wood is such a joy.

        --
        -Chris Schwartz
        Silver Spring, MD


        >
        >
        > I took a woodturning class on Saturday that focused on green wood. I
        > have the book, "Turning Green Wood" by Michael O'Donnell.
        >
        > I have two issues that the instructor and (I think) the book didn't
        > cover:
        >
        > I can get geen wood but don't always have the time to turn. Do any of
        > you have any suggestions on keeping it wet? Can I submerge it?
        >
        > The piece I turned in class was wormy. I don't always clean my shop
        > right away and I don't want critters getting in my wood stacks or worse
        > yet, into my house framing. How can I deal with insects before
        > bringing green wood into the house?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Ulrich
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Joseph Hayes
        ... I ve never heard of him. Guess I got some reading to do. :) ... That was my plan, too. I just need to decide if I want to make or buy a froe. I ve
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 3, 2004
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          > John Alexander of www.greenwoodworking.com has a hot-tub size tank
          > full of wood. He says some of it has been in for 25 years. He's the
          > one I copied from.

          I've never heard of him. Guess I got some reading to do. :)

          > The wood is in there in riven billets.

          That was my plan, too. I just need to decide if I want to make or buy
          a froe. I've tried splitting with wedges, but didn't like the results.

          Ulrich




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        • C N Schwartz
          I don t use a froe on billets 4 feet long or more until they are at least eighths. The froe isn t beefy enough to do much bigger. The tree I got my wood from
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 3, 2004
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            I don't use a froe on billets 4 feet long or more until they are at least
            eighths. The froe isn't beefy enough to do much bigger.

            The tree I got my wood from was 150 years old, and more than 3 feet in
            diameter. We did all our splitting with multiple metal wedges and gluts
            (wooden wedges). It was also done with short metal mallet with a head
            almost as big as a shot put.

            It IS work.



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Joseph Hayes [mailto:von_landstuhl@...]
            Sent: Friday, December 03, 2004 3:16 PM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Turning Green Wood




            > John Alexander of www.greenwoodworking.com has a hot-tub size tank
            > full of wood. He says some of it has been in for 25 years. He's the
            > one I copied from.

            I've never heard of him. Guess I got some reading to do. :)

            > The wood is in there in riven billets.

            That was my plan, too. I just need to decide if I want to make or buy
            a froe. I've tried splitting with wedges, but didn't like the results.

            Ulrich




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