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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Digest Number 682

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  • Tim Bray
    ... ManuScriptS. Colin
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 2, 2005
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      Pardon my ignorance, but what !@#$ does 'MSS' mean. I see it a lot it
      various references and it often confuses the %^&& out of me.

      ManuScriptS.

      Colin


    • Helen Schultz
      MSS is a sort of abbreviation for Medieval Manuscript. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Meisterin Katarina Helene von Schönborn, OL Shire
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 2, 2005
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        MSS is a sort of abbreviation for "Medieval Manuscript."
         
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Meisterin Katarina Helene von Schönborn, OL
        Shire of Narrental (Peru, Indiana)  http://narrental.home.comcast.net
        Middle Kingdom
        http://meisterin.katarina.home.comcast.net
         
        "A room without books is like a body without a soul." -- Cicero
         
        "The danger in life is not that we aim too high and miss.
        The problem is that we aim too low and hit the mark."  -- Michaelangelo
         
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        ----- Original Message -----


        Pardon my ignorance, but what !@#$ does 'MSS' mean. I see it a lot it
        various references and it often confuses the %^&& out of me.


        William Castille

      • Bill McNutt
        It s librarian-speak for manuscript. I think that it refers to the actual, original copy of a historic document, but it may also refer to facsimiles.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2005
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          It's librarian-speak for "manuscript." I think that it refers to the
          actual, original copy of a historic document, but it may also refer to
          facsimiles. Librarians also call "books" "monographs."

          Master Will
          http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Kim & Steve Maynard [mailto:smay1986@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, March 02, 2005 3:29 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Digest Number 682


          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Message: 1
          > Date: Tue, 01 Mar 2005 09:53:38 -0800
          > From: Tim Bray <tbray@...>
          > in MSS. Check out "Master Builders of the Middle Ages" or

          Pardon my ignorance, but what !@#$ does 'MSS' mean. I see it a lot it
          various references and it often confuses the %^&& out of me.


          William Castille




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        • msgilliandurham
          ... Well, unless the book is in a set published over time, in which case we may call them serials. Technically, a monograph is something that
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 2, 2005
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            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@p...>
            wrote:
            > Librarians also call "books" "monographs."
            >
            > Master Will

            Well, unless the book is in a set published over time, in which case
            we may call them "serials."
            <g, d, and r>

            Technically, a monograph is something that comes out once and that's
            it -- its format could be a pamphlet, IIRC, as well as a book. (Very
            techincally, I suppose a film could be a monograph, until its
            producers commit sequalism on it <g>) "Monograph" refers to the
            frequency of the object's production, "book" to its format.

            In practice, the distinction between monograph and serial has as
            much or more to do with how the material is purchased than how it's
            published.

            For example, some scholarly or research periodicals are published in
            book format, but over a space of time -- "Occasional Papers of the
            Turnip Twaddlers Society of Little Wingham". If your library makes a
            committment to purchase the entire set as a "standing order" (sort
            of an open-ended subscription) and you catalog it as a set
            ("Occasional Papers of the Turnip Twaddlers Society of Little
            Wingham" with Vol. 1, 2005; Vol. 2, 2006" etc.) it's a serial. If
            you only purchase some of the volumes (the ones in which your
            faculty have essays, for example) and you catalog each one
            separately ("16th century Turnip Twaddlers of Schleswig and
            Holstein: Occasional Papers of the Turnip Twaddlers Society of
            Little Wingham") then the volumes your library owns are said to be
            *treated* as monographs, even though they are published as a series.

            Which is probably more than anyone here really wanted to know about
            the topic :-) We now return you to your regularly scheduled mundane
            nit-picking.

            Gillian Durham
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