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  • James W. Pratt, Jr.
    Does any one know how the windmills were geared? or referances to start looking? James Cunningham I have the grind stones but no wind mill. ... From:
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 15, 2005
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      Does any one know how the windmills were geared? or referances to start
      looking?

      James Cunningham
      I have the grind stones but no wind mill.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "msgilliandurham" <msgilliandurham@...>
      To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 9:24 AM
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] no feet on travelling boxes? WAS: Stan Hunter's
      Medieval Furniture Page


      >
      >
      > Thanks very much for posting this! Now I have a question:
      >
      > This documents states
      >
      > "Footed chests were not generally intended to be moved and the feet
      > raised the chest up off damp floors."
      >
      > and
      >
      > "Chests without feet, or unfooted chests, were used primarily for
      > traveling."
      >
      > (I'm looking at page 8 of the *.pdf)
      >
      > These statements are not footnoted -- can anyone point me to
      > evidence for this, please?
      >
      > (Not that I'm going to quit footing chests built to sit on damp
      > grass and dirt, I'm just curious)
      >
      > Thanks in advance,
      > Gillian Durham
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • sdhunter3
      James, The following are in the Colonial Williamsburg Rockefeller Library: TJ823 .B46 1996 VIDEO Seven centuries of the English windmill [videorecording] Bent,
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 15, 2005
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        James,

        The following are in the Colonial Williamsburg Rockefeller Library:

        TJ823 .B46 1996 VIDEO
        Seven centuries of the English windmill [videorecording]
        Bent, David.

        TJ823 .H55 1996
        Power from wind : a history of windmill technology
        Hills, Richard Leslie, 1936-

        TJ823 .K43 1987
        Harvesting the air : windmill pioneers in twelfth-century England
        Kealey, Edward J.

        TS2135 .U62 V83 1978
        The Miller in eighteenth-century Virginia : an account of mills & the
        craft of milling, as well as a description of the windmill near the
        palace in Williamsburg
        Ford, Thomas K.

        TJ823 .D38 1972
        The Windmill yesterday and today
        De Little, R. J.

        TJ825 .W27 1968
        The English windmill
        Wailes, Rex, 1901-

        PS3573 .A423 W5
        A windmill near Calvary
        Waldrop, Keith.

        TJ823 .S753 1962
        The Dutch windmill
        Stokhuyzen, F. (Frederik), 1890-1976.

        TJ823 .K62 1949
        Windmills in Virginia : with special reference to windmill sites in
        Williamsburg ; an account of the history, design and construction of
        windmills in the Old Dominion, illustrated by examples from Virginia,
        and comparable types from the other American colonies and abroad
        Kocher, A. Lawrence (Alfred Lawrence)

        Hope this helps. The library might do interlibrary loan.

        Sir Stanford

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
        <cunning@f...> wrote:
        > Does any one know how the windmills were geared? or referances to
        start
        > looking?
        >
        > James Cunningham
        > I have the grind stones but no wind mill.
        >
      • James W. Pratt, Jr.
        Thanks!! I also found a site on dutch wind mills http://webserv.nhl.nl/~smits/windmill.htm Nice big Period wooden gears. James Cunningham ... From: sdhunter3
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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          Thanks!! I also found a site on dutch wind mills
          http://webserv.nhl.nl/~smits/windmill.htm
          Nice big Period wooden gears.

          James Cunningham


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "sdhunter3" <sd_hunter@...>
          To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 9:12 PM
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: New Subject


          >
          >
          > James,
          >
          > The following are in the Colonial Williamsburg Rockefeller Library:
          >
          > TJ823 .B46 1996 VIDEO
          > Seven centuries of the English windmill [videorecording]
          > Bent, David.
          >
          > TJ823 .H55 1996
          > Power from wind : a history of windmill technology
          > Hills, Richard Leslie, 1936-
          >
          > TJ823 .K43 1987
          > Harvesting the air : windmill pioneers in twelfth-century England
          > Kealey, Edward J.
          >
          > TS2135 .U62 V83 1978
          > The Miller in eighteenth-century Virginia : an account of mills & the
          > craft of milling, as well as a description of the windmill near the
          > palace in Williamsburg
          > Ford, Thomas K.
          >
          > TJ823 .D38 1972
          > The Windmill yesterday and today
          > De Little, R. J.
          >
          > TJ825 .W27 1968
          > The English windmill
          > Wailes, Rex, 1901-
          >
          > PS3573 .A423 W5
          > A windmill near Calvary
          > Waldrop, Keith.
          >
          > TJ823 .S753 1962
          > The Dutch windmill
          > Stokhuyzen, F. (Frederik), 1890-1976.
          >
          > TJ823 .K62 1949
          > Windmills in Virginia : with special reference to windmill sites in
          > Williamsburg ; an account of the history, design and construction of
          > windmills in the Old Dominion, illustrated by examples from Virginia,
          > and comparable types from the other American colonies and abroad
          > Kocher, A. Lawrence (Alfred Lawrence)
          >
          > Hope this helps. The library might do interlibrary loan.
          >
          > Sir Stanford
          >
          > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
          > <cunning@f...> wrote:
          > > Does any one know how the windmills were geared? or referances to
          > start
          > > looking?
          > >
          > > James Cunningham
          > > I have the grind stones but no wind mill.
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Bill McNutt
          I ve been comfortable with the assertion that tung oil is not a period finish for western Europe, but I was wondering if anyone had any further comments?
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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            I've been comfortable with the assertion that tung oil is not a period
            finish for western Europe, but I was wondering if anyone had any further
            comments?

            Master Will
            http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood
          • James Winkler
            The best argument that I ve ever heard is that Tung Oil come from the Tung Nut which comes from the Tung Tree in an area of China... seems as though tung
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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              The best argument that I've ever heard is that Tung Oil come from the 'Tung Nut' which comes from the 'Tung Tree' in an area of China...  seems as though tung oil in its native and raw state has a rather annoying property of catalyzing when it comes into contact with air.  (Open a can o' pure tung oil...  let it 'breath' for a while... screw the cap back on and let it sit on a shelf for a month or so...  either totally hard... or a thick skin...)  So... consider the problems with transport...  transport the raw nuts... rot and deterioration... transport the oil...  it would harden before it got to its destination... 
               
              ... so, the only way to really transport the technology would be the way it was done...  steal some trees...  once you have a nice 'Tung Forest'... you can work locally to make the oil for polishing...
               
              Now... exactly how accurate this is I don't know... don't have the documentation in hand... but it seems highly plausible to me...
               
              From: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0105/feature1/assignment1.html   " I remember a gilt-edged day in a museum in the old port of Quanzhou. Before me was the well-preserved hull of a junk, 113 feet (34 meters) long, that dated to Marco’s era. Some of its details were amazingly like those of seagoing ships that he described. For example, he wrote that Chinese shipwrights repaired leaky hulls by nailing on new layers of planking, up to six. The museum’s junk had two complete layers plus part of a third. Marco also described Chinese caulk: “...lime and hemp chopped small...mixed with oil from a tree.” “That was tung oil,” museum curator Wang Lianmao told me. “We found this same caulk between the boards. The formula is not mentioned in any Chinese record—only in Marco Polo’s book.” Yep, I told myself again that day, Marco was in China. "
               
              Chas.
               
               
              =======================================
               

              I've been comfortable with the assertion that tung oil is not a period
              finish for western Europe, but I was wondering if anyone had any further
              comments?

              Master Will
              http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood

            • Bill McNutt
              That pretty much validates my vague recollection, as well as the few (rather thin) references I ve found on-line. I think that, at the moment, my position is
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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                That pretty much validates my vague recollection, as well as the few (rather thin) references I’ve found on-line.   I think that, at the moment, my position is going to be “period for Chinese, but not for Western Europe,” with the caveat that, like all finishes, it appears to be under-documented.

                 

                -----Original Message-----
                From: James Winkler [mailto:jrwinkler@...]
                Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 4:41 PM
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Tung Oil

                 

                The best argument that I've ever heard is that Tung Oil come from the 'Tung Nut' which comes from the 'Tung Tree' in an area of China...  seems as though tung oil in its native and raw state has a rather annoying property of catalyzing when it comes into contact with air.  (Open a can o' pure tung oil...  let it 'breath' for a while... screw the cap back on and let it sit on a shelf for a month or so...  either totally hard... or a thick skin...)  So... consider the problems with transport...  transport the raw nuts... rot and deterioration... transport the oil...  it would harden before it got to its destination... 

                 

                ... so, the only way to really transport the technology would be the way it was done...  steal some trees...  once you have a nice 'Tung Forest'... you can work locally to make the oil for polishing...

                 

                Now... exactly how accurate this is I don't know... don't have the documentation in hand... but it seems highly plausible to me...

                 

                From: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0105/feature1/assignment1.html   " I remember a gilt-edged day in a museum in the old port of Quanzhou. Before me was the well-preserved hull of a junk, 113 feet (34 meters) long, that dated to Marco’s era. Some of its details were amazingly like those of seagoing ships that he described. For example, he wrote that Chinese shipwrights repaired leaky hulls by nailing on new layers of planking, up to six. The museum’s junk had two complete layers plus part of a third. Marco also described Chinese caulk: “...lime and hemp chopped small...mixed with oil from a tree.” “That was tung oil,” museum curator Wang Lianmao told me. “We found this same caulk between the boards. The formula is not mentioned in any Chinese record—only in Marco Polo’s book.” Yep, I told myself again that day, Marco was in China. "

                 

                Chas.

                 

                 

                 

              • Dragano Abbruciati
                Test!! Nobody told me there was going to be a test!!! /scurries off to study/ Omer wrote: test ... Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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                  Test!!  Nobody told me there was going to be a test!!!
                   
                  /scurries off to study/

                  Omer <omer77@...> wrote:
                  test


                  Do you Yahoo!?
                  Yahoo! Search presents - Jib Jab's 'Second Term'

                • Omer
                  test ... From: James W. Pratt, Jr. To: Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 3:23 PM Subject: Re:
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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                    test
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "James W. Pratt, Jr." <cunning@...>
                    To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 3:23 PM
                    Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: New Subject


                    >
                    > Thanks!! I also found a site on dutch wind mills
                    > http://webserv.nhl.nl/~smits/windmill.htm
                    > Nice big Period wooden gears.
                    >
                    > James Cunningham
                    >
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "sdhunter3" <sd_hunter@...>
                    > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 9:12 PM
                    > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: New Subject
                    >
                    >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > James,
                    > >
                    > > The following are in the Colonial Williamsburg Rockefeller Library:
                    > >
                    > > TJ823 .B46 1996 VIDEO
                    > > Seven centuries of the English windmill [videorecording]
                    > > Bent, David.
                    > >
                    > > TJ823 .H55 1996
                    > > Power from wind : a history of windmill technology
                    > > Hills, Richard Leslie, 1936-
                    > >
                    > > TJ823 .K43 1987
                    > > Harvesting the air : windmill pioneers in twelfth-century England
                    > > Kealey, Edward J.
                    > >
                    > > TS2135 .U62 V83 1978
                    > > The Miller in eighteenth-century Virginia : an account of mills & the
                    > > craft of milling, as well as a description of the windmill near the
                    > > palace in Williamsburg
                    > > Ford, Thomas K.
                    > >
                    > > TJ823 .D38 1972
                    > > The Windmill yesterday and today
                    > > De Little, R. J.
                    > >
                    > > TJ825 .W27 1968
                    > > The English windmill
                    > > Wailes, Rex, 1901-
                    > >
                    > > PS3573 .A423 W5
                    > > A windmill near Calvary
                    > > Waldrop, Keith.
                    > >
                    > > TJ823 .S753 1962
                    > > The Dutch windmill
                    > > Stokhuyzen, F. (Frederik), 1890-1976.
                    > >
                    > > TJ823 .K62 1949
                    > > Windmills in Virginia : with special reference to windmill sites in
                    > > Williamsburg ; an account of the history, design and construction of
                    > > windmills in the Old Dominion, illustrated by examples from Virginia,
                    > > and comparable types from the other American colonies and abroad
                    > > Kocher, A. Lawrence (Alfred Lawrence)
                    > >
                    > > Hope this helps. The library might do interlibrary loan.
                    > >
                    > > Sir Stanford
                    > >
                    > > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
                    > > <cunning@f...> wrote:
                    > > > Does any one know how the windmills were geared? or referances to
                    > > start
                    > > > looking?
                    > > >
                    > > > James Cunningham
                    > > > I have the grind stones but no wind mill.
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • James Winkler
                    A A C D B A D B C D ... so, how d I do?? Ummm... what were the questions??? Chas. (who is glad this was multiple choice...) ==================== Test!!
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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                      A
                      A
                      C
                      D
                      B
                      A
                      D
                      B
                      C
                      D
                       
                      .... so, how'd I do??  Ummm... what were the questions???
                       
                      Chas. 
                      (who is glad this was multiple choice...)
                       
                      ====================
                       

                      Test!!  Nobody told me there was going to be a test!!!
                       
                      /scurries off to study/

                      Omer <omer77@...> wrote:
                      test

                    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                      Yes this is a SAC test...minimum passing score is 100% Test!! Nobody told me there was going to be a test!!! /scurries off to study/
                      Message 10 of 12 , Feb 16, 2005
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                        Yes this is a SAC test...minimum passing score is 100%
                         
                        Test!!  Nobody told me there was going to be a test!!!
                         
                        /scurries off to study/

                      • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                        Colonial Willamsburg has a working windmill I d HIGHLY recommend a field trip! ... ===== Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something
                        Message 11 of 12 , Feb 18, 2005
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                          Colonial Willamsburg has a working windmill

                          I'd HIGHLY recommend a field trip!


                          --- "James W. Pratt, Jr." <cunning@...> wrote:

                          > Does any one know how the windmills were geared? or
                          > referances to start
                          > looking?
                          >
                          > James Cunningham
                          > I have the grind stones but no wind mill.
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: "msgilliandurham" <msgilliandurham@...>
                          > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 9:24 AM
                          > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] no feet on travelling
                          > boxes? WAS: Stan Hunter's
                          > Medieval Furniture Page
                          >
                          >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Thanks very much for posting this! Now I have a
                          > question:
                          > >
                          > > This documents states
                          > >
                          > > "Footed chests were not generally intended to be
                          > moved and the feet
                          > > raised the chest up off damp floors."
                          > >
                          > > and
                          > >
                          > > "Chests without feet, or unfooted chests, were
                          > used primarily for
                          > > traveling."
                          > >
                          > > (I'm looking at page 8 of the *.pdf)
                          > >
                          > > These statements are not footnoted -- can anyone
                          > point me to
                          > > evidence for this, please?
                          > >
                          > > (Not that I'm going to quit footing chests built
                          > to sit on damp
                          > > grass and dirt, I'm just curious)
                          > >
                          > > Thanks in advance,
                          > > Gillian Durham
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >


                          =====
                          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                          Aude Aliquid Dignum
                          ' Dare Something Worthy '



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                        • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                          I recently saw some drawings of Romen planes. They looked like they had a glued on sole. We are back tracking the bibligraghy now. Does anyone know when
                          Message 12 of 12 , Oct 21, 2005
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                            I recently saw some drawings of Romen planes.  They looked like they had a glued on sole.  We are back tracking the bibligraghy now.  Does anyone know when soles(as in a different wood than the plane body) were put on planes?
                             
                            James Cunningham
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