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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Uses for sand?

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  • James Winkler
    ... Ulrich wrote: Not necessarily. I don t think the issue is whether Rennaissance man thought medieval furniture was old or modern, but whether it was worth
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1, 2005
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      > pieces we perceive as 'old' would have been modern to
      them.

      Ulrich wrote: "Not necessarily. I don't think the issue is whether Rennaissance man
      thought medieval furniture was old or modern, but whether it was worth
      preserving."
       
      You're correct... but I was responding to a question about whether or not medieval people might have intentionally 'aged' or antiqued their furniture to make them look old...  to quote myself in entirety...
       
      "The idea of antiquing is interesting...  the fun part about it though... assuming that the collecting of antiquities had any value to the antiquaries that were our predecessors...  how would you know if a piece was a forgery or was actually an 'old piece'...   particularly since the pieces we perceive as 'old' would have been modern to them."
       
      The context is whether or not someone in the 13th century (for example) might have really had any interest in 'antiques' of say 200 years before.  Assuming the positive, let's say a 13th c. carpenter built a chest in a 11th century mode...  would WE, short of using dendrochronology be able to tell??
       
      The original question on whether or not people of the medieval period had any interest in 'antiquities' is rather fascinating.  There are (obviously) artifacts that have come down through the centuries to us... so, inherently they must have been well taken care of... so some argument can be made that they did have some appreciation for 'old stuff'... but I think the question is, did they value their old stuff because it belonged to great-grandpa (the 'relic' mentality)... or because of a quality more akin to our 'its rare' mentality...
       
      In the trusty "Oak" book... there are a number of examples of 6 board chests that sit low to the ground...  so the question is... are these examples built this way by design... or are they older high leg 6 board chest who's feet have rotted away and the legs were cut off to make em' look better and still be useful...  (I'm bettin on the latter...  I own a late 16th c. 6 board chest... the 'feet' aren't in the best shape...  could have been a candidate for reutilizing at any time...)...
       
      Chas.
       
       
    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11, 2005
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        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
        http://www.albionworks.com
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