Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MedievalSawdust] Uses for sand?

Expand Messages
  • James Winkler
    ... Colin wrote, This is confusing... I thought gesso was the substance used to prepare the ground before paint was applied, but this sentence seems to say
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1 12:33 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      >""Fragments from Ballatcare, Man suggest that the
      >leather
      facing of this shield was painted with
      >black and red patterns on a white
      background. It
      >was suggested that gesso (organic matrix, such
      >as
      egg yolk) paint was used (Bersu and Wilson 1966).

      Colin wrote, "This is confusing... I thought gesso was the substance used to prepare the
      ground before paint was applied, but this sentence seems to say that gesso
      is a type of paint.   Can someone clear that one up?"
       
      Edward the Black Prince's shield (the one is given this treatment (gesso)... basically I'm guessing that there may be an 'and' missing in the citation ("gesso and paint").   The Black Prince's shield was laid up planks covered with linen (similar to panel lay up for painters... hummm....) and then covered with leather.  Over this, gesso was used to 'sculpt' a 3-D bas relief kinda' thing so that the lion stood proud from the face... this was then painted... 
       
      I've got a shield built up this way... but without the gesso... the idea of somebody beating on a plaster and glue mix and chunks of it flying around the list probably wouldn't make the marshals happy...  and I'd have to keep repairing it...  which wouldn't make me happy...
       
      Chas.
    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11 9:24 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
        http://www.albionworks.com
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.