Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Newbie looking for a clue

Expand Messages
  • Gary Halstead
    Medieval carpenters/joiners (with the exception of part-time rural ones) don t seem to have cut their own wood. Certainly, by the 13-14th c. most wood used in
    Message 1 of 66 , Feb 1, 2005
      Medieval carpenters/joiners (with the exception of part-time rural ones)
      don't seem to have cut their own wood. Certainly, by the 13-14th c.
      most wood used in urban areas would have been imported from either the
      Baltic or the Alps. Given the time needed for transport, most of the
      wood would have been at least semi-seasoned by the time it reached the
      joiner's shop. The fact that the majority of imported wood was sawn
      rather than rived indicates that it was probably intended to be worked dry.

      Building furniture from green wood requires some fairly specific
      techniques so that the piece comes together as it shrinks. (Take a look
      at http://heartofthewood.com for some examples of what can be done with
      green wood.) None of the European pieces that I have been able to look
      at show examples of these techniques. That said, I'm fairly sure there
      was a green woodworking tradition in England given the speed at which
      17th c. American joiners were able to produce impressive pieces.

      Ranulf

      davidgiles.rm wrote:
      >
      > Heres my two cents worth...... All the pics I' ve seen the wood
      > appears to have been worked green and allowed to dry after assembly
      > since green wood is much easier to work and seeing that most
      > carpenters cut their own or ordered it if they need a lot ,only using
      > dried lumber for important patrons. It seems to me that unless you
      > need an extremely tight box for storage ,it would begin to look
      > better as it dried and shrank.As I said this is only my two cents
      > worth and may not count for a hill of beans.
      > No offense is intended to anyone on this list.
      > thank you
      > David
      >
    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
      Shoes!!! wood shoe soles?!! did you see any shoes? Were they all turn shoe ? James Cunningham Slipper Maker
      Message 66 of 66 , Feb 5, 2005
        Shoes!!! wood shoe soles?!! did you see any shoes? Were they all turn shoe
        ?

        James Cunningham
        Slipper Maker

        >
        > oooh! oooh! story time! yea!
        >
        > I had to wear gloves....
        >
        > But I got to hold six different English
        > pattens this past spring at the Museum of
        > London..... THAT was cool!
        >
        >
        > --- Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Ok, stories . . .
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Last time I was at the Cloisters Annex of the Met in
        > > NYC I did it in
        > > garb. The Cloisters is FULL of great photo ops.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I mentioned to the guard that I hoped we hadn't
        > > caused too much concern.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The response:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ""Oh, 'you people' are never any trouble at all.
        > > It's the kids."
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > "We people?'
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Heh. (That was shortly after I flung myself between
        > > a kid with a sticky
        > > lollipop and the Merode Altarpiece.)
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Master Will
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: James Winkler [mailto:jrwinkler@...]
        > > Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 12:47 PM
        > > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Green vs. dry (was:
        > > Re: Newbie looking
        > > for a clue
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Oh wow... I'm thinkin' this may be another
        > > 'woodworker trait'...
        > > m'Lady and I did the same thing at the Toledo Museum
        > > (... a cantilevered
        > > table...)... we got lucky... the guards found it
        > > 'amusing'...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I've also been known to crawl under cool benches at
        > > restaurants...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Favorite story... there's this spiffy chest (with a
        > > woodburnt design on
        > > the front) at the Indianapolis Art musueum... First
        > > time I saw it I was
        > > overwhelmed... I sat down and started to examine it
        > > 'closely'... I
        > > didn't TOUCH anything... just was kinda'...
        > > *close*... soon I heard
        > > footsteps... I turned around and there was this very
        > > long legged,
        > > red-headed lady guard... she just watched.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I decided to let her know my interests and assure
        > > her that I meant no
        > > evil to the artifact under study... She seemed
        > > comforted and mentioned
        > > that they had observed me looking (but not touching)
        > > on the security
        > > camera. After a couple of minutes of chat she
        > > wandered off and I went
        > > back to my stuidies...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ... a year later I found myself back at the
        > > museum... but this time with
        > > a notebook to make some sketches in... sitting on
        > > the floor *closely*
        > > examining the chest. I heard footsteps... I turned
        > > around... there was
        > > this long-legged, red-headed lady guard...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ... she looked at me and said, "Oh... its you."...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Ya' gotta' love it...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Chas.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > =============================
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Heh, been to the museum, done that. Got asked not
        > > to by guard.
        > >
        > > Master Will
        > >
        > > I guess the only other way is to lie down on the
        > > floor and look up at
        > > the thing, noting where the rail meets the stile.
        > >
        > > --
        > > -Chris Schwartz
        > > Silver Spring, MD
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _____
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/
        > >
        > >
        > > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
        > > to:
        > > medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > <mailto:medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
        > > Yahoo!
        > > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of
        > > Service.
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > =====
        > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
        >
        > Aude Aliquid Dignum
        > ' Dare Something Worthy '
        >
        >
        >
        > __________________________________
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more.
        > http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.