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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Newbie looking for a clue

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  • Haraldr Bassi (yahoogroups)
    ... I was with you to this point... I am not sure they were rechucked in the viking age. The extant examples I have seen all seem to show the same ovaling that
    Message 1 of 66 , Feb 1, 2005
      On Tue, February 1, 2005 0:17, James Winkler said:
      > ;-[) We're a pretty easy goin' bunch... never knew any body here to
      > take offense at a good opinion...
      >
      > I'm thinkin' you may have a point... lathe turned bowls were started
      > green (or 'green-ish'... turned with a core on the inside and...
      > apparently set aside for a while to season out a bit once the walls of the
      > bowl/cup were started... after the moisture was lowered they were
      > re-chucked and finish turned...

      I was with you to this point... I am not sure they were rechucked in the
      viking age. The extant examples I have seen all seem to show the same
      ovaling that our pieces that were finish turned in the green have shown.
      Very green works while greenish is very difficult to work. Given that a
      bowl or cup will oval, I am unsure how the piece would be rechucked. Also,
      the cores and the mandrels found in the viking age show a method to attach
      the wood that doesn't lend itself to rechucking.


      > in all probability a culture that worked
      > without having a lumberyard filled with kiln dried lumber would have a
      > much better hand on understanding wood moisture, what part of a log to
      > take planks and billets out of to minimize shrinkage, splitting, warping,
      > twisting, etc... AND THEN there's the issue that most of these folks were
      > probably working with older and slower growth woods... much more stable
      > in many ways that the stuff we get to use...

      Woodworkers up to the 40's seemed to understand wood much better than we
      have since that point. Look at the example of the windsor chair and the
      different woods chosen and worked at different times and dryness to ensure
      you have a chair where seasonal change works to keep the chair tight.

      > .. wonder if anybody's ever done a grain orientation study of the planks
      > on some of these chests???

      Unfortunately most of the pictures don't show it... there are some
      writeups I've seen that show grain orientation.

      Haraldr

      --
      Dave Calafrancesco

      ... They got the library at Alexandria, they aren't getting mine!
    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
      Shoes!!! wood shoe soles?!! did you see any shoes? Were they all turn shoe ? James Cunningham Slipper Maker
      Message 66 of 66 , Feb 5, 2005
        Shoes!!! wood shoe soles?!! did you see any shoes? Were they all turn shoe
        ?

        James Cunningham
        Slipper Maker

        >
        > oooh! oooh! story time! yea!
        >
        > I had to wear gloves....
        >
        > But I got to hold six different English
        > pattens this past spring at the Museum of
        > London..... THAT was cool!
        >
        >
        > --- Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Ok, stories . . .
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Last time I was at the Cloisters Annex of the Met in
        > > NYC I did it in
        > > garb. The Cloisters is FULL of great photo ops.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I mentioned to the guard that I hoped we hadn't
        > > caused too much concern.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The response:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ""Oh, 'you people' are never any trouble at all.
        > > It's the kids."
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > "We people?'
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Heh. (That was shortly after I flung myself between
        > > a kid with a sticky
        > > lollipop and the Merode Altarpiece.)
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Master Will
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: James Winkler [mailto:jrwinkler@...]
        > > Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 12:47 PM
        > > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Green vs. dry (was:
        > > Re: Newbie looking
        > > for a clue
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Oh wow... I'm thinkin' this may be another
        > > 'woodworker trait'...
        > > m'Lady and I did the same thing at the Toledo Museum
        > > (... a cantilevered
        > > table...)... we got lucky... the guards found it
        > > 'amusing'...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I've also been known to crawl under cool benches at
        > > restaurants...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Favorite story... there's this spiffy chest (with a
        > > woodburnt design on
        > > the front) at the Indianapolis Art musueum... First
        > > time I saw it I was
        > > overwhelmed... I sat down and started to examine it
        > > 'closely'... I
        > > didn't TOUCH anything... just was kinda'...
        > > *close*... soon I heard
        > > footsteps... I turned around and there was this very
        > > long legged,
        > > red-headed lady guard... she just watched.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I decided to let her know my interests and assure
        > > her that I meant no
        > > evil to the artifact under study... She seemed
        > > comforted and mentioned
        > > that they had observed me looking (but not touching)
        > > on the security
        > > camera. After a couple of minutes of chat she
        > > wandered off and I went
        > > back to my stuidies...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ... a year later I found myself back at the
        > > museum... but this time with
        > > a notebook to make some sketches in... sitting on
        > > the floor *closely*
        > > examining the chest. I heard footsteps... I turned
        > > around... there was
        > > this long-legged, red-headed lady guard...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ... she looked at me and said, "Oh... its you."...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Ya' gotta' love it...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Chas.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > =============================
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Heh, been to the museum, done that. Got asked not
        > > to by guard.
        > >
        > > Master Will
        > >
        > > I guess the only other way is to lie down on the
        > > floor and look up at
        > > the thing, noting where the rail meets the stile.
        > >
        > > --
        > > -Chris Schwartz
        > > Silver Spring, MD
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _____
        > >
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