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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Uses for sand?

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  • Gary Halstead
    Commentary, below inter alia; ... Pretty common practice, although no idea if gesso was used to prep the surface in those cases. ... Polychromed statues had a
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1, 2005
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      Commentary, below inter alia;

      Tim Bray wrote:
      >
      >>in the middle ages I'm not sure they would have dreamed of putting paint
      >>directly on wood.
      >
      >
      > Hmmm... gonna have to check on that. I'm pretty sure I have seen some
      > carved work where paint (usually red) was applied to the ground to make the
      > tracery stand out better.

      Pretty common practice, although no idea if gesso was used to prep the
      surface in those cases.

      > Also we should check on polychromed wood statues, and see if all of them
      > were gessoed first or not. Some of the later period work, like
      > Reimanschneider, is so deeply carved it's hard to imagine gessoing it.

      Polychromed statues had a varying amount of gesso. Some are fairly
      lightly gessoed to allow the carving detail to show through, while
      others are more heavily gessoed with the final detailing done in the
      gesso layer. The Riemanschneider era carvings were never gessoed, but
      got a light coat of tinted oil/varnish to bring out the details.

      <snip>

      >> (My understanding is that bare wood is more of an Victorian construct
      >>and would not have necessarily met with medieval tastes...).
      >
      >
      > Nevertheless, many 15th c. Flemish paintings of interiors clearly show
      > unpainted wooden furniture, even in very high-class surroundings.

      There seems to have been a shift in taste sometime in the 15th C., since
      we start seeing unpainted furniture showing up in copious amounts. This
      may have been the result of Classical influence creeping up from Italy
      since Italian Renaissance furniture is also unpainted (except for cassoni).

      Ranulf

      > Cheers,
      > Colin
      >
      >
      > Albion Works
      > Furniture and Accessories
      > For the Medievalist!
      > http://www.albionworks.net
      > http://www.albionworks.com
    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11, 2005
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        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
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