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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Uses for sand?

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  • Haraldr Bassi (yahoogroups)
    ... There are a few viking age pieces of wood that didn t seem to have paint on them. The rest seem to have paint right on the wood. ... Not that I have
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1, 2005
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      On Mon, January 31, 2005 22:10, Tim Bray said:
      >
      >
      >>in the middle ages I'm not sure they would have dreamed of putting paint
      >>directly on wood.
      >
      > Hmmm... gonna have to check on that. I'm pretty sure I have seen some
      > carved work where paint (usually red) was applied to the ground to make
      > the
      > tracery stand out better.

      There are a few viking age pieces of wood that didn't seem to have paint
      on them. The rest seem to have paint right on the wood.

      > Also we should check on polychromed wood statues, and see if all of them
      > were gessoed first or not. Some of the later period work, like
      > Reimanschneider, is so deeply carved it's hard to imagine gessoing it.
      >
      > And how about those Scandinavian carved and painted objects? I doubt the
      > Vikings gessoed their shields, for instance.

      Not that I have seen... and I see lots of wooden pieces in color on the
      Vikings! CD-Rom that show color in the carvings.

      > Panel painting I will grant you was probably seldom, if ever, done
      > directly
      > on bare wood. But there were lots of other wooden objects that received
      > paint, and I very much doubt they were all gessoed first. Panel painting
      > itself is only a late-medieval art form.

      If by late-medieval you mean after the egyptians and even into the 6th
      Century, perhaps... Panel painting has been happening for a very very very
      long time. See byzantine icon paintings for a very good selection of
      techniques that were employed. The Getty museum in LA has an excellent
      collection of byzantine icons from early through middle into late period.
      Then there are the large paintings from later period. Interestingly
      enough, some of the more famous paintings have been lifted off the wooden
      panels and placed onto canvas in the distant past.

      It is also interesting to see the similarities of putting a ground onto a
      wood panel and putting a ground onto a canvas panel. The goal was to make
      a very very smooth surface to work with that would stay smooth over the
      years.



      >
      >>So... the question is... how often would chests NOT be painted... and,
      >>what was the difference in status between a painted v. non-painted chest?
      >
      > A lot of carved chests seem to have received paint only to highlight the
      > carving - the plain surfaces may have been left natural. And chests were
      > possessed by all levels of society; the ones at the lower levels were
      > undoubtedly less decorated. Painting was a way of increasing the value of
      > an object.

      This is mostly because wood was their plastic. Everything that was made at
      that time was made with either wood or dirt (clay and glass).

      >> (My understanding is that bare wood is more of an Victorian construct
      >> and would not have necessarily met with medieval tastes...).
      >
      > Nevertheless, many 15th c. Flemish paintings of interiors clearly show
      > unpainted wooden furniture, even in very high-class surroundings.
      >

      Haraldr

      --
      Dave Calafrancesco

      ... They got the library at Alexandria, they aren't getting mine!
    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11, 2005
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        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
        http://www.albionworks.com
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