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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Uses for sand?

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  • Tim Bray
    ... This is confusing... I thought gesso was the substance used to prepare the ground before paint was applied, but this sentence seems to say that gesso is a
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1, 2005
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      >""Fragments from Ballatcare, Man suggest that the
      >leather facing of this shield was painted with
      >black and red patterns on a white background. It
      >was suggested that gesso (organic matrix, such
      >as egg yolk) paint was used (Bersu and Wilson 1966).

      This is confusing... I thought gesso was the substance used to prepare the
      ground before paint was applied, but this sentence seems to say that gesso
      is a type of paint. Can someone clear that one up?

      In any case, this is clearly not a case of paint applied directly to wood,
      but to a leather facing.

      >Traces of white paint were found on a wooden
      >fragment
      >from the Manx Cronk Moar shield(Bersu and Wilson
      >1966)."

      So, was this paint applied directly to the wood, or on a gesso ground?

      We're constantly running into this problem with archaeological reports:
      they don't include enough information to answer questions that never
      occurred to the archaeologists.

      Cheers,
      Colin


      Albion Works
      Furniture and Accessories
      For the Medievalist!
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    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11, 2005
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        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
        http://www.albionworks.com
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