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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Uses for sand?

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  • Bill McNutt
    Forgers who make antiques can sometimes be found to justify themselves by essentially adding to the number of available artifacts for collectors. The
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1, 2005
      Message
      Forgers who make "antiques" can sometimes be found to justify themselves by essentially "adding" to the number of available artifacts for collectors.
       
      The position is:  "If your reproduction is PERFECT, if you can't tell the difference, have you not successfully re-created the past?"
       
       
      Master William

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: James Winkler [mailto:jrwinkler@...]
       
      The idea of antiquing is interesting...  the fun part about it though... assuming that the collecting of antiquities had any value to the antiquaries that were our predecessors...  how would you know if a piece was a forgery or was actually an 'old piece'...   particularly since the pieces we perceive as 'old' would have been modern to them.
       
      I think this is what the refered to as a 'conundrum'...
       
      Chas.
    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11, 2005
        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
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        http://www.albionworks.net
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