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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Uses for sand?

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  • James Winkler
    ;-]) Ya just reminded me of an old joke... Two archaeologists were working on a dig in ancient,ancient, ANCIENT Greece... one of em unearthed a coin.
    Message 1 of 138 , Feb 1, 2005
      ;-])   Ya' just reminded me of an old joke... 
       
      Two archaeologists were working on a dig in ancient,ancient, ANCIENT Greece...  one of em' unearthed a coin. 
      "Hey, Bob!", he called to the other archaeologist... "I've found something..."
      "What did you find?", his companion asked...
      "A really old coin..."
      "How old do you think it is?"
      "It was made in exactly 514 BC."
      "How do you know its exactly 514 BC?"
      "Here, look for yourself... that’s the date stamped right on the coin..."
       
      Forgeries are as old as the hills...  Avery has some really neat pictures of some clay Roman coin forgery molds from England... seems that the soldiers found a great way to supplement their income by making molds of the coins they got paid in... then melting down the silver, added some cheaper metals to the mix and...  voila'...  6 coins become 7... or 8... or... 
       
      The idea of antiquing is interesting...  the fun part about it though... assuming that the collecting of antiquities had any value to the antiquaries that were our predecessors...  how would you know if a piece was a forgery or was actually an 'old piece'...   particularly since the pieces we perceive as 'old' would have been modern to them.
       
      I think this is what the refered to as a 'conundrum'...
       
      Chas.
       
      ========================================
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: maf@...
      Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 9:14 AM
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Uses for sand?

      I had a thought, is there any period evidence to 'antiquing'? My mother used
      sand to put scrathces in a modern piece so it would look older and match the
      rest of the true antiques in the room.

      The idea of making something appear to be something else more valuable to
      soak some one seems to be very old. I have a reference to the oldest
      countrfeit coin being found in greece and it is less than 5 years newer than
      when the greeks started using coins.

      Just a though.

      Cered




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    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11, 2005
        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


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