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Sanding (Lets beat that horse a bit more)

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  • Justus Koshiol
    Sanding (oye) I ve run into this question over and over with my students. The quickest way to end the conversation is to show them a piece of wood that has
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 31, 2005
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      Sanding (oye)

      I've run into this question over and over with my students.

      The quickest way to end the conversation is to show them a piece
      of wood that has been properly planned. (They call it a
      smoothing plane for a reason.) A card scraper is a wonderful
      tool as well and will leave a perfect surface for finishing.

      No amount of sanding will give you the beautiful smooth sheen
      that a sharp hand plan will. Because a plane shears the fibers,
      where sandpaper grinds and tears the fibers.

      The same is true for carving. Sharp tools will leave a
      wonderfully smooth surface, and if necessary a smoothing riffler
      will smooth any hollows or hard to reach spots.

      Justus
    • windsingersmoon
      Ah, just the opening I need to mention Burnishers When I finish a hardwood carving (especially walnut or cherry) after I have carefully tool smoothed/curved
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 3 4:48 PM
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        Ah, just the opening I need to mention 'Burnishers'

        When I finish a hardwood carving (especially walnut or cherry)
        after I have carefully tool smoothed/curved all curved pieces etc.

        I go over the whole carving with an agate burnisher.
        This compresses any small irregularities and creates a WONDERFUL
        hard sheen everywhere the burnisher has passed.

        I have a rather large piece of agate that is set in a crude-looking,
        but very heavy silver 'ring' that slides down my index finger to the
        second joint, giving me Good (and comfortable) control for
        burnishing.

        I found it in an antique shop.
        Someone before me, had need enough of it to have it made for their
        burnishing needs.
        It has served me well, for many years and I have never seen another
        one.
        Shara


        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Justus Koshiol
        <justus1199@y...> wrote:
        > Sanding (oye)
        >
        > I've run into this question over and over with my students.
        >
        > The quickest way to end the conversation is to show them a piece
        > of wood that has been properly planned. (They call it a
        > smoothing plane for a reason.) A card scraper is a wonderful
        > tool as well and will leave a perfect surface for finishing.
        >
        > No amount of sanding will give you the beautiful smooth sheen
        > that a sharp hand plan will. Because a plane shears the fibers,
        > where sandpaper grinds and tears the fibers.
        >
        > The same is true for carving. Sharp tools will leave a
        > wonderfully smooth surface, and if necessary a smoothing riffler
        > will smooth any hollows or hard to reach spots.
        >
        > Justus
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