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A period 'specal purpose' table?

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  • rivendalehall
    Hey ya ll - A friend of me sent a rather fascinating picture and, after some scrounging around on the internet, I found a web link that shows it..
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 27, 2005
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      Hey ya'll -

      A friend of me sent a rather fascinating picture and, after some
      scrounging around on the internet, I found a web link that shows it..

      http://www.geocities.com/tarocchi7/Hof2-4.html

      These are images from a mid-15th c. deck of cards. The 'tailor' was
      the one that I was sent... and *if* I'm seeing what I'm seeing
      correctly, I'd like to draw your attention to the 'cutting table'
      the tailor's using. While basically identical to similar tables of
      the period (the "St. Jerome's Table" that I did plans for...) it has
      a fascinating feature. While my friend originally thought that this
      might be a folding table if you look closely at the tailor cutting
      the fabric you'll note that what appears to be a join in the table
      top is actually 'cutting slot'. (There is a shadow line showing
      where the lower portion of the scissors are below the table... I'm
      figuring that this is what is has to be for two reasons... a: they
      match up with where the lower blade would be... and b: the other
      blade of the scissors is close to and parallel to the table
      top...). To the best of my knowledge this is first 'special
      purpose' table I've ever seen. As for the cutting slot...
      commercial cutting tables at fabric stores have similar slots in the
      as well...

      As another interesting point... take a look at the potter card...
      that kick wheel looks like an interesting project as well...

      Chas.
    • Joseph Hayes
      ... I like the baker, since I ve been collecting pictures of period backpacks. My wife and I do a 10 mile backpacking trip each Labor Day weekend and I m
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 27, 2005
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        --- rivendalehall <jrwinkler@...> wrote:
        > As another interesting point... take a look at the potter card...
        > that kick wheel looks like an interesting project as well...

        I like the baker, since I've been collecting pictures of period
        "backpacks." My wife and I do a 10 mile backpacking trip each Labor
        Day weekend and I'm trying to convice her to a period trip. Sort of an
        "army on the march" kind of thing.

        Ulrich




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      • Nest verch Tangwistel
        ... Very neat picture. I have a regular table I use in almost the exact same way. It is an antique pine dining tabel with two leafs (leaves?)in it. Where the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 28, 2005
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          > These are images from a mid-15th c. deck of cards. The 'tailor' was
          > the one that I was sent... and *if* I'm seeing what I'm seeing
          > correctly, I'd like to draw your attention to the 'cutting table'
          > the tailor's using. While basically identical to similar tables of
          > the period (the "St. Jerome's Table" that I did plans for...) it has
          > a fascinating feature. While my friend originally thought that this
          > might be a folding table if you look closely at the tailor cutting
          > the fabric you'll note that what appears to be a join in the table
          > top is actually 'cutting slot'. (There is a shadow line showing
          > where the lower portion of the scissors are below the table... I'm
          > figuring that this is what is has to be for two reasons... a: they
          > match up with where the lower blade would be... and b: the other
          > blade of the scissors is close to and parallel to the table
          > top...). To the best of my knowledge this is first 'special
          > purpose' table I've ever seen. As for the cutting slot...
          > commercial cutting tables at fabric stores have similar slots in the
          > as well...

          > Chas.

          Very neat picture. I have a regular table I use in almost the exact same
          way. It is an antique pine dining tabel with two leafs (leaves?)in it.
          Where the crack for the leaves is a natural groove has formed where the
          fit has become a bit loose over the years. I always cut fabric to make
          clothes on it, and use the grove as a cutting slot.

          Nest

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        • Dianne & Greg Stucki
          ... From: Nest verch Tangwistel To: Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 7:56 AM Subject: Re:
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 28, 2005
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Nest verch Tangwistel" <eastarch@...>
            To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, January 28, 2005 7:56 AM
            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] A period 'specal purpose' table?


            I have a regular table I use in almost the exact same
            > way. It is an antique pine dining tabel with two leafs (leaves?)in it.
            > Where the crack for the leaves is a natural groove has formed where the
            > fit has become a bit loose over the years. I always cut fabric to make
            > clothes on it, and use the grove as a cutting slot.
            >
            > Nest

            I do the same thing. So much SCA clothing can be constructed simply of
            rectangles, and with my nice big (30x60") table and two "cutting slots",
            it's a breeze!

            Laurensa
          • Dragano Abbruciati
            I must agree with your cutitng slot theory. Also, take a look at the Barber - interesting towel bar supports. And the Potter - scalloped supports for the
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 28, 2005
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              I must agree with your cutitng slot theory.
               
              Also, take a look at the "Barber" - interesting towel bar supports.
               
              And the "Potter" - scalloped supports for the shelf.
               
              Dragano

              rivendalehall <jrwinkler@...> wrote:

              Hey ya'll -

              A friend of me sent a rather fascinating picture and, after some
              scrounging around on the internet, I found a web link that shows it..

              http://www.geocities.com/tarocchi7/Hof2-4.html

              These are images from a mid-15th c. deck of cards.  The 'tailor' was
              the one that I was sent... and *if* I'm seeing what I'm seeing
              correctly, I'd like to draw your attention to the 'cutting table'
              the tailor's using.   While basically identical to similar tables of
              the period (the "St. Jerome's Table" that I did plans for...) it has
              a fascinating feature.  While my friend originally thought that this
              might be a folding table if you look closely at the tailor cutting
              the fabric you'll note that what appears to be a join in the table
              top is actually 'cutting slot'.  (There is a shadow line showing
              where the lower portion of the scissors are below the table... I'm
              figuring that this is what is has to be for two reasons...  a: they
              match up with where the lower blade would be... and b: the other
              blade of the scissors is close to and parallel to the table
              top...).   To the best of my knowledge this is first 'special
              purpose' table I've ever seen.  As for the cutting slot...
              commercial cutting tables at fabric stores have similar slots in the
              as well... 

              As another interesting point... take a look at the potter card... 
              that kick wheel looks like an interesting project as well...

              Chas.


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            • James Winkler
              I tried looking at the Barber... couldn t get past that body position of he who is being shaved... the hands in the lap... the look of barely restrained terror
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 28, 2005
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                I tried looking at the Barber... couldn't get past that body position of he who is being shaved... the hands in the lap... the look of barely restrained terror in his eyes as the barber approaches his face with that symitar...  well...  O.k.   Maybe I'm reading a 'bit' into that one...
                 
                BTW... any body have any idea of what that thing might represent on the right side of the table (right at the end of the joint or gap between the two top boards...)??? 
                 
                Chas.
                 

                I must agree with your cutitng slot theory.
                 
                Also, take a look at the "Barber" - interesting towel bar supports.
                 
                And the "Potter" - scalloped supports for the shelf.
                 
                Dragano
              • Joseph Hayes
                ... It reminds me of a hinge I saw on the end-grain of a table (a game table, I think). I ll have to see if I can find that picture. But it could also be
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 28, 2005
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                  --- James Winkler <jrwinkler@...> wrote:
                  > BTW... any body have any idea of what that thing might represent on
                  > the right side of the table (right at the end of the joint or gap
                  > between the two top boards...)???

                  It reminds me of a hinge I saw on the end-grain of a table (a game
                  table, I think). I'll have to see if I can find that picture.

                  But it could also be staple used to edge-join the boards or to keep
                  them spread to maintain a gap.

                  Ulrich




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