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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Novice Woodworking Questions

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  • Caley Woulfe
    ... of ... thickness ... place ... one ... I think I ll buy one to get started with and ake one later as I get better at this sort of thing. Thanks! Caoillainn
    Message 1 of 138 , Dec 5, 2004
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      > I can only speak for myself. Doweling jig can be made with a section
      of
      > alum. "L" angle that works very well. I made a few for different
      thickness
      > of wood years ago and still use them. Poplar is a good wood to use in
      place
      > of Oak and here in the south is know as poor mans Oak. Dove tails take
      > practices and you will waste some wood, try using half laps, box joints or
      > rabbits. Go to the library and check out the book of Roy Underhill, good
      > starting point. A table saw is a great thing to have but a good quality
      one
      > is a pleasure and a real time saver. It will pay in the long run to spend
      > the money on a good one not a cheap one.
      >
      > Omer


      I think I'll buy one to get started with and ake one later as I get better
      at this sort of thing.

      Thanks!

      Caoillainn
    • Tim Bray
      ... 18th c. is the earliest I ve seen reference to it. French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac appears to be a 1594
      Message 138 of 138 , Feb 11 9:24 PM
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        >Question When was French polish with rotten stone and pumis(sp) start being
        >used?

        18th c. is the earliest I've seen reference to it.

        French polishing uses shellac. The earliest English reference to shellac
        appears to be a 1594 description by a fellow travelling in India, who saw
        the locals using it. I have no idea if the Italians or other Europeans
        were using it before then - it's quite possible, as the English were
        notoriously backward about such things.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
        http://www.albionworks.com
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