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Am I seein' what I think I'm seein'??

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  • rivendalehall <jrwinkler@msn.com>
    Hi gang... Well, there I wuz , cleaning up my hard drive and I ran across a directory containing images of various lathes and stuff... (it might have come from
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 10, 2003
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      Hi gang...

      Well, there I wuz', cleaning up my hard drive and I ran across a
      directory containing images of various lathes and stuff... (it might
      have come from Avery... don't remember...)... anyway... as I was
      viewing the images something suddenly jumped out at me...

      I've uploaded the images on the Medieval Sawdust 'files' section...
      take a look at it. If you notice, the 'turner' in the left picture
      has bowls, plates and things WITHOUT HANDLES stacked around in front
      of him... it also looks like he's using a springpole lathe of some
      sort...

      The 'turner' in the right picture however has plates, pipkins,
      steins... and stuff WITH handles on them... he's also using a 'great
      wheel lathe...

      Now... what I'm thinkin' is that the picture on the right doesn't
      show a turner at all... but a pewterer spinning metal (I'm guessing
      at the pewter thing... but as silver was generally raised as far as I
      know... ;-)

      So... take a good close look at them pitchers... whatcha'll think...
      am I hallucinatin' here... or what???

      Chas.
    • Tom Rettie
      ... You are entirely right. Those images come from Jost Amman s Book of Trades, and the gentlemen with the great wheel lathe are pewterers, not wood turners.
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 11, 2003
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        >Now... what I'm thinkin' is that the picture on the right doesn't
        >show a turner at all... but a pewterer spinning metal (I'm guessing
        >at the pewter thing... but as silver was generally raised as far as I
        >know... ;-)
        >
        >So... take a good close look at them pitchers... whatcha'll think...
        >am I hallucinatin' here... or what???

        You are entirely right. Those images come from Jost Amman's "Book of
        Trades," and the gentlemen with the great wheel lathe are pewterers, not
        wood turners. There's one more lathe in that book that belongs to a bell
        founder, also a great wheel lathe. I have yet to find a documentary
        example of a wood turner using a continuous rotation lathe pre-1600.

        Regards,

        Tom R.

        ------------------------------------------------
        Tom Rettie tom@...
        http://www.his.com/~tom/index.html
      • Bear <avalonbear@hotmail.com>
        ... not ... bell ... The Lathe with continuous rotation The foot driven Lathe with continuous rotation was introduced in the 18th century. Initially used by
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 12, 2003
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Tom Rettie <tom@h...> wrote:

          > You are entirely right. Those images come from Jost Amman's "Book of
          > Trades," and the gentlemen with the great wheel lathe are pewterers,
          not
          > wood turners. There's one more lathe in that book that belongs to a
          bell
          > founder, also a great wheel lathe. I have yet to find a documentary
          > example of a wood turner using a continuous rotation lathe pre-1600.
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Tom R.


          The Lathe with continuous rotation
          The foot driven Lathe with continuous rotation was
          introduced in the 18th century. Initially used by
          royalty, the Lathe eventually found its way to the all
          the craftsmen. The Lathe was built out of wood and
          later the wood was replaced by metal frames. For
          nearly 200 years the Lathe remained unchanged. In the
          early 20th century the foot driven Lathe was replaced
          by a water driven Lathe.
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