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Re: [MedievalSawdust] book question

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  • Tim Bray
    ... I ve been trying to locate a copy for years. Send me one, willya? I ve seen a review of it, though (probably on Ranulf s site), and it might not be as
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 30, 2004
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      >Woodworking techniques before A.D. 1500 : papers presented to a symposium
      >at Greenwich in September, 1980, together with edited discussion / edited
      >by Sean McGrail.

      I've been trying to locate a copy for years. Send me one, willya?

      I've seen a review of it, though (probably on Ranulf's site), and it might
      not be as cool as the title makes it sound.

      > Tage Frid teaches woodworking.

      This is excellent. My favorite one-volume recommendation for beginning to
      intermediate woodworkers. I learned joinery from this book.

      Salaman I have, but don't refer to it much - it's OOP. The others I'm not
      familiar with.

      Roy Underhill is a living god, and his books are terrific.

      Cheers,
      Colin

      p.s. You should go look at Ranulf's annotated bibliography:
      http://www.medievalwoodworking.com/books.htm


      Albion Works
      Furniture and Accessories
      For the Medievalist!
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    • Gary Halstead
      See comments, below. Colin already posted a link to my bibliographies/reviews - so I won t repeat that. The best general work on tool history is Goodman s
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 1, 2004
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        See comments, below. Colin already posted a link to my
        bibliographies/reviews - so I won't repeat that. The best general work
        on tool history is Goodman's _The History of Woodworking Tools_ which is
        pretty easy to find.

        Ranulf

        Rob Lewis wrote:
        > Just looking through the on-line catalog for the library accross the way
        > from my office, has anyone heard of the following books, and are the much
        > use?
        >
        >
        > Woodworking techniques before A.D. 1500 : papers presented to a symposium at
        > Greenwich in September, 1980, together with edited discussion / edited by
        > Sean McGrail.

        A collection of papers covering woodworking from the Stone Age to 1500.
        There's some good information in there, but you'll have to dig for it.
        Probably of more use to the in-depth researcher, but if you can read it
        in the library - why not?

        > Tage Frid teaches woodworking.

        Never read this one.

        > The illustrated encyclopedia of woodworking handtools, instruments, &
        > devices : containing a full description of the tools used by carpenters,
        > joiners, and cabinet makers, with many examples of tools used by other
        > woodworkers such as, woodsmen, sawyers, coach makers, wheelwrights,
        > shipwrights, wainwrights, coopers, turners, pattern makers, and whittlers /
        > written and illustrated by Graham Blackburn.

        Mostly 18th and 19th century, but good for general background since
        woodworking tools don't change that much over the centuries. I'm a
        great fan of Blackburn's writing and drawing.

        > Tools : working wood in eighteenth-century America / by James M. Gaynor and
        > Nancy L. Hagedorn.

        An exhibition catalog of (surprise!) 18th century tools. Nothing
        period, but still cool if you're interested in woodworking history or
        old tools.

        > Dictionary of tools used in the woodworking and allied trades, c. 1700-1970
        > / R. A. Salaman ; foreword by Joseph Needham. (this one is in the
        > referance section only)

        Useful for reference, but I wouldn't want to try and read through it.

        > Woodworking tools, 1600-1900 / Peter C. Welsh. (this one is in the special
        > collections)

        Short paper on tools, a couple of period tidbits, but nothing important.
        Don't know why this is in special collections since you can find a
        used copy for about $10.

        > Carpentry for beginners; how to use tools, basic joints, workshop practice,
        > designs for things to make, edited by Charles H. Hayward.

        Haven't read this one.
      • Bill McNutt
        I prefer Ancient Carpenter s Tools. Master Will http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood ... From: Gary Halstead [mailto:ghalstead@adelphia.net] Sent: Wednesday, December
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 1, 2004
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          I prefer Ancient Carpenter's Tools.

          Master Will
          http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Gary Halstead [mailto:ghalstead@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2004 11:06 AM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] book question


          See comments, below. Colin already posted a link to my
          bibliographies/reviews - so I won't repeat that. The best general work
          on tool history is Goodman's _The History of Woodworking Tools_ which is

          pretty easy to find.

          Ranulf

          Rob Lewis wrote:
          > Just looking through the on-line catalog for the library accross the
          way
          > from my office, has anyone heard of the following books, and are the
          much
          > use?
          >
          >
          > Woodworking techniques before A.D. 1500 : papers presented to a
          symposium at
          > Greenwich in September, 1980, together with edited discussion / edited
          by
          > Sean McGrail.

          A collection of papers covering woodworking from the Stone Age to 1500.
          There's some good information in there, but you'll have to dig for it.

          Probably of more use to the in-depth researcher, but if you can read it
          in the library - why not?

          > Tage Frid teaches woodworking.

          Never read this one.

          > The illustrated encyclopedia of woodworking handtools, instruments, &
          > devices : containing a full description of the tools used by
          carpenters,
          > joiners, and cabinet makers, with many examples of tools used by other
          > woodworkers such as, woodsmen, sawyers, coach makers, wheelwrights,
          > shipwrights, wainwrights, coopers, turners, pattern makers, and
          whittlers /
          > written and illustrated by Graham Blackburn.

          Mostly 18th and 19th century, but good for general background since
          woodworking tools don't change that much over the centuries. I'm a
          great fan of Blackburn's writing and drawing.

          > Tools : working wood in eighteenth-century America / by James M.
          Gaynor and
          > Nancy L. Hagedorn.

          An exhibition catalog of (surprise!) 18th century tools. Nothing
          period, but still cool if you're interested in woodworking history or
          old tools.

          > Dictionary of tools used in the woodworking and allied trades, c.
          1700-1970
          > / R. A. Salaman ; foreword by Joseph Needham. (this one is in the
          > referance section only)

          Useful for reference, but I wouldn't want to try and read through it.

          > Woodworking tools, 1600-1900 / Peter C. Welsh. (this one is in the
          special
          > collections)

          Short paper on tools, a couple of period tidbits, but nothing important.

          Don't know why this is in special collections since you can find a
          used copy for about $10.

          > Carpentry for beginners; how to use tools, basic joints, workshop
          practice,
          > designs for things to make, edited by Charles H. Hayward.

          Haven't read this one.




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