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finishing question.. "modern"?

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  • maeryk
    Okay.. I have been turning bottle-stoppers like a madman. Mostly exotics, but some domestic woods.. (exotics: purple heart, padauk, coco-bolo, zebrawood,
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 7, 2004
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      Okay.. I have been turning bottle-stoppers like a madman. Mostly exotics,
      but some domestic woods.. (exotics: purple heart, padauk, coco-bolo,
      zebrawood, domestics: redwood burl, birs-eye maple, osage orange, mesquite).

      I'm quite happy with how they are coming out, but since they will be used
      around wine (alcohol + wet) I am looking for a high-gloss shine with water
      protection.

      Now, I have one of the "friction polishes".. which is basically a laquer
      with toluene and a couple of other "flash off"components. You lay it on with
      the lathe running, and rub it with a rag til it sets up, but it seems FAR
      from waterproof.. and if you even get it damp, it loses most of its gloss.

      I have tried Johnsons paste wax, butchers wax, beeswax, linseed, tung,
      whatever.. they just don't seem to KEEP the shine they have on the lathe.

      Is it a case of just not enough coats? (I'm doing like.. 3 or 4..) or should
      I be looking elsewhere for finishes? (note: this should be something
      relatively quick.. four or five hours worth of finishing is not conducive to
      profit in this venture)

      Thanks folks!

      Maeryk
    • James Winkler
      Maeryk - Yep... I know what you mean... the friction polish makes a great shine... but like most lacquer finishes, isn t well served by water. I ve tried
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 8, 2004
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        Maeryk - 
         
        Yep... I know what you mean...  the 'friction polish' makes a great shine... but like most lacquer finishes, isn't well served by water.  I've tried the same list you have...  and with the same results.  I'm not sure what the 'pros' use... but I've just settled for 'the warm glow of a natural wax finish'...  that's my "ad copy"... and I'm stickin' to it...  (I've never tried 'high gloss' poly...  it ain't period but might worth playing with.  It would be interesting to see if it could be 'lathe applied'... hummm....)
         
        Chas.
         
        ===================
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: maeryk
        Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2004 7:46 PM
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] finishing question.. "modern"?

        Okay.. I have been turning bottle-stoppers like a madman. Mostly exotics,
        but some domestic woods.. (exotics: purple heart, padauk, coco-bolo,
        zebrawood, domestics: redwood burl, birs-eye maple, osage orange, mesquite).

        I'm quite happy with how they are coming out, but since they will be used
        around wine (alcohol + wet) I am looking for a high-gloss shine with water
        protection.

        Now, I have one of the "friction polishes".. which is basically a laquer
        with toluene and a couple of other "flash off"components. You lay it on with
        the lathe running, and rub it with a rag til it sets up, but it seems FAR
        from waterproof.. and if you even get it damp, it loses most of its gloss.

        I have tried Johnsons paste wax, butchers wax, beeswax, linseed, tung,
        whatever.. they just don't seem to KEEP the shine they have on the lathe.

        Is it a case of just not enough coats? (I'm doing like.. 3 or 4..) or should
        I be looking elsewhere for finishes? (note: this should be something
        relatively quick.. four or five hours worth of finishing is not conducive to
        profit in this venture)

        Thanks folks!

        Maeryk





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      • maeryk
        ... shine... but like most lacquer finishes, isn t well served by water. I ve tried the same list you have... and with the same results. I m not sure what
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 8, 2004
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James Winkler"
          <jrwinkler@m...> wrote:
          > Maeryk -
          >
          > Yep... I know what you mean... the 'friction polish' makes a great
          shine... but like most lacquer finishes, isn't well served by water.
          I've tried the same list you have... and with the same results. I'm
          not sure what the 'pros' use... but I've just settled for 'the warm
          glow of a natural wax finish'... that's my "ad copy"... and I'm
          stickin' to it... (I've never tried 'high gloss' poly... it ain't
          period but might worth playing with. It would be interesting to see
          if it could be 'lathe applied'... hummm....)
          >
          > Chas.

          Well, I succesfully applied uv-resist Behr tung on the lathe
          yesterday.. (just turn the speed WAYYY down before you put it on.. or
          when you go to take the apron off at the end of the day you will find
          it glued to shirt (or skin) underneath by flung finish).

          Seemed to work pretty well.. its a piece of box elder with some
          serious red in it, and I wanted to keep the UV from eating the color
          (as it does with Box Elder). So.. I soaked a rag, rubbed it back and
          forth till it looked wet and glossy, stopped the lathe, and let it
          sit for about ten minutes till it JUST started to dull, and repeated
          the process. Let it sit another ten minutes, then spun it back up and
          buffed it down with a clean rag. Came out with a nice shine, and dry
          to the touch (not even any shine on my fingers if I ran them over it).

          Looks good, and about 1/2 hour after that, stopped smelling like tung
          (mineral) oil entirely.

          Maeryk
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