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Johann's workbench

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  • The Luegges
    Johann, can you tell me where you got the plans for the workbench or any other information about it? I am interested in building one. Is it easily
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 20, 2004
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      Johann, can you tell me where you got the plans for the workbench or any other information about it?  I am interested in building one.  Is it easily transported?
       
      Many thanks, Oengus OhEigceartaigh.
       
       
       
      People will forget what you said... People will forget what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel...
       

    • John LaTorre
      ... Gee, I didn t use any plans. It s a pastiche of two medieval workbenches, elements of which I simplified and incorporated into my own design. (The original
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 21, 2004
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        Oengus OhEigceartaigh wrote:

        > Johann, can you tell me where you got the plans for the workbench
        > or any other information about it? I am interested in building
        > one. Is it easily transported?

        Gee, I didn't use any plans. It's a pastiche of two medieval workbenches,
        elements of which I simplified and incorporated into my own design. (The
        original illustrations are on pages 8 and 9 of Scott Landis's "The Workbench
        Book" (Taunton Press: ISBN 0=918804-76-0). I haven't spec'ed it out because
        it's still more or less a work in progress, although now that it's had
        nearly two years and maybe ten tourneys under its belt, I guess I should
        consider it more or less finalized, and get around to drawing up some plans
        this winter. If you're intending to attend Estrella War, I'll be bringing it
        so you can have a first-hand gander at it.

        It transports very easily. The main slab is about two feet wide, four feet
        long, and about two and a half inches thick. The four detachable legs, made
        from 4x4 dimensional lumber, are about three feet long. The vise bits go
        into a cardboard box about the size of a case of beer, along with the plane,
        screw clamps, frame saw bits, and other miscellaneous tools. One of my many
        projects this winter is to make a Mastermyr-style tool box to replace the
        cardboard box.

        Thanks for asking.

        Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
      • kjworz@comcast.net
        Pictures!!!! -- -Chris Schwartz Silver Spring, MD
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 21, 2004
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          Pictures!!!!
           
          --
          -Chris Schwartz
          Silver Spring, MD
           
          -------------- Original message --------------

          >
          > Oengus OhEigceartaigh wrote:
          >
          > > Johann, can you tell me where you got the plans for the workbench
          > > or any other information about it? I am interested in building
          > > one. Is it easily transported?
          >
          > Gee, I didn't use any plans. It's a pastiche of two medieval workbenches,
          > elements of which I simplified and incorporated into my own design. (The
          > original illustrations are on pages 8 and 9 of Scott Landis's "The Workbench
          > Book" (Taunton Press: ISBN 0=918804-76-0). I haven't spec'ed it out because
          > it's still more or less a work in progress, although now that it's had
          > nearly two years and maybe ten tourneys under its belt, I guess I should
          > consider it more or less finalized, and get around to drawing up some plans
          > this winter. If you're intending to attend Estrella War, I'll be bringing it
          > so you can have a first-hand gander at it.
          >
          > It transports very easily. The main slab is about two feet wide, four feet
          > long, and about two and a half inches thick. The four detachable legs, made
          > from 4x4 dimensional lumber, are about three feet long. The vise bits go
          > into a cardboard box about the size of a case of beer, along with the plane,
          > screw clamps, frame saw bits, and other miscellaneous tools. One of my many
          > projects this winter is to make a Mastermyr-style tool box to replace the
          > cardboard box.
          >
          > Thanks for asking.
          >
          > Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • John LaTorre
          Chris Schwartz asked for pictures of my workbench. There are two places online where they may be found. The first is in the Photos section of the this
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 22, 2004
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            Chris Schwartz asked for pictures of my workbench. There are two places
            online where they may be found. The first is in the "Photos" section of the
            this discussion list:

            http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/lst?.dir=/Johann%27s+Wo
            rkbench&.src=gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/

            (You might have to cut-and-paste a bit to get a URL that long into your
            browser window, and it might not work unless you give your password to the
            site. It might be easier just to go to the Yahoo website, find the Medieval
            Sawdust section, and click on "Photos" on the sidebar.)

            The second place is Steve Peck's website, which shows the bench in use:

            http://www.blkmtn.org/index.php?q=image/tid/6

            I'll try to get some more pictures posted as I take them.

            Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
          • kjworz@comcast.net
            Where did you get the vise design? I remeber something like that in Moxon, but I m not sure. You mentioned the workbench book, but they must surely have
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 22, 2004
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              Where did you get the vise design?   I remeber something like that in Moxon, but I'm not sure.  You mentioned the workbench book, but they must surely have gotten it somewhere.
               
              I''ve been interested in the simple Roubo bench featured in the Workbench Book.  No vises at all, just stops and holdfasts.
               
              --
              -Chris Schwartz
              Silver Spring, MD
               
              -------------- Original message --------------

              >
              > Chris Schwartz asked for pictures of my workbench. There are two places
              > online where they may be found. The first is in the "Photos" section of the
              > this discussion list:
              >
              > http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/lst?.dir=/Johann%27s+Wo
              > rkbench&.src=gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/
              >
              > (You might have to cut-and-paste a bit to get a URL that long into your
              > browser window, and it might not work unless you give your password to the
              > site. It might be easier just to go to the Yahoo website, find the Medieval
              > Sawdust section, and click on "Photos" on the sidebar.)
              >
              > The second place is Steve Peck's website, which shows the bench in use:
              >
              > http://www.blkmtn.org/index.php?q=image/tid/6
              >
              > I'll try to get some more pictures posted as I take them.
              >
              > Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
              >
              >
              >
              >
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              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/
              >
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              > medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
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              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • John LaTorre
              ... The Workbench Book, page 9. The drawing is described as a 1505 drawing by Nuremburg engineer Loeffelholz (which name translates, curiously, as wooden
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 24, 2004
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                Chris wrote:

                > Where did you get the vise design?

                The "Workbench Book," page 9. The drawing is described as a "1505 drawing by
                Nuremburg engineer Loeffelholz" (which name translates, curiously, as
                "wooden spoon") the original of which can be found in the Deutsche
                Stattsbibliothek, Berlin. My redaction is just a slightly simplified version
                of what I think the original might have looked like. The illustrated bench
                also shows an end vise on the same bench, which I dispensed with for
                simplicity's sake, and haven't missed.

                Landis has a very good section on the origins of threading, as well, on
                pages 122-123.

                > I''ve been interested in the simple Roubo bench featured in the
                > Workbench Book. No vises at all, just stops and holdfasts.

                That's a nice one, too. But I like vices ... I mean, vises ...


                Baron Johann von Drachenfels (John LaTorre)
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