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Re: carving 101 and wood

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  • davidgiles.rm
    hello I was reading this message and thought you might like to know that mulberry is a good bow wood so if if you only have small diameter logs and dont want
    Message 1 of 57 , Oct 1, 2004
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      hello
      I was reading this message and thought you might like to know that
      mulberry is a good bow wood so if if you only have small diameter logs
      and dont want to mess with it oyu could contact a local bowyer ,he
      might be interested in it.
      good luck
      David

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Dragano Abbruciati
      <dragano_abbruciati@y...> wrote:
      > Thank you!
      >
      > Sweetgum - don't know it by any other name, will have to look it up.
      >
      > Red Oak - felled a big red oak about 4 years back and made
      a "rustic" picnic table from it. You are right about the bark.
      After about 6 months, the area where I left the bark on for that
      rustic look started to rot. Fortunately, I caught it in time. Still
      have the table and benches but I can tell you this is NOT an ideal
      outdoor wood.
      >
      > Mulberry - I may try using this for small boxes or something. It's
      pretty wood but it's just not big enough to get any sizable boards
      from. I will probably wax the ends and dry it whole. I'll try to
      remember to let you all know how that works out.
      >
      > Pecan - Yes, very hard wood. Hadn't considered it for tools -
      Great Idea (lemme see.. I need a bow saw and a froe, and a...)!
      >
      > Pear - Thanks for the "weighted" drying advice. I wouldn't have
      even considered that. I have never worked with pear before...will
      have to give that some thought.
      >
      > Dragano
      >
      > C N Schwartz <kjworz@c...> wrote:
      > Sweetgum? Gumball tree? Roy Underhill calls it furniture wood, I
      call it "meh...." Won't split well, so saw only. Can have some nice
      figure. In demand for furniture in Europe for who knows what
      reason. Maybe cuz they think it looks like Italian walnut. Use the
      heartwood for that
      >
      > Red Oak. Good. Get it before it rots. Get the bark off, and get
      the tree off the ground and let no water collect on it/under it.
      Unless it is small. If small, don't bother unless you need something
      oak-y.
      >
      > Mulberry? Dunno anything about it. It's garbage wood too, like
      the gum. Remember, "garbage wood" often means "Commercially unviable
      but REALLY fun for hobbiests that don't mind"
      >
      > Pecan and pear? You LUCKY fellow. Fruit wood on that Pear make
      GREAT tool handles. I've heard Pecan is also nice, Hickory like.
      Put the pear on the bottom of the woodpile for seasoning. It warps
      without weight.
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Dragano Abbruciati [mailto:dragano_abbruciati@y...]
      > Sent: Thursday, September 30, 2004 3:43 PM
      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] carving 101 and wood
      >
      >
      > While you good wood-wizards are answering that one...
      >
      > Ivan the Terrible leveled some big trees at my home. Tell me about
      Sweetgum, Pecan, Pear, Mulberry, and Red Oak.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Dragano
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
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    • Nest verch Tangwistel
      First, thank you all for the ideas. Second, I didn t know how little I knew about this before I started looking. I borrowed a set of carving chisels off of my
      Message 57 of 57 , Oct 5, 2004
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        First, thank you all for the ideas.

        Second, I didn't know how little I knew about this before I started
        looking.

        I borrowed a set of carving chisels off of my father. Wait these are
        called gouges, right? There were six of them. The blades styles consisted
        of 4 gentle curves and 2 sharp angles I then grabbed a 8"x8" piece of one
        inch thick air dried pine, and drew a quick sketch of a Tudor rose on it.
        After about 3 hours of digging away at it I ended up with something. I put
        a picture in the photo section in Nest's folder. The dark lines are not
        shadows, but discoloration in the wood.

        So now that I just waded in and started I decided to go to a store and
        look around. Boy, I could be in trouble now. I found a woodworkers store
        about 15 minutes from my work. The range of tools and wood pieces fairly
        has me staggered. They even give classes. They have 2 coming up which
        sounded interesting. One on chip carving, and one on hand made
        dovetailing. I bought a book on carving "How to carve wood" by Richard
        Butz and an 8 mm palm handled chisel. Stright edge was one of the things
        the set did not have.

        I think I have settled on carving a rather small box for my first project.
        That is all I have in mind right now.

        Again thank you all for getting me started.

        Nest




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