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Shaving Horses

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  • Tom Rettie
    ... Chris, Welcome. Nice lathe. ;-) I know of two good sources for shaving horses: Roy Underhill s The Woodwright s Shop and Scott Landis The Workbench
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 8 2:04 PM
      >I would like to build a shaving horse and I saw the picture posted on
      >this site recently. Can someone post the approximate dimensions of the
      >major pieces and the type of wood used? Thanks a lot.

      Chris,

      Welcome. Nice lathe. ;-)

      I know of two good sources for shaving horses: Roy Underhill's "The
      Woodwright's Shop" and Scott Landis' "The Workbench Book." Both are in
      print and may be available through your local library or inter-library loan.

      I generally agree with Roy that a shaving horse should be tailored for the
      person who is going to use it (and what they're going to use it for). He
      says most of his are from red or white oak, but he's also seen his students
      make them from red cedar, maple, pine, and walnut.

      Landis' book has a bunch of interesting designs for shave and brakes,
      including English-style ones where the dumbhead is supported by two struts
      on the outside instead of one coming up in the middle.

      Mine's about 6 feet long, and high enough so my thighs are parallel to the
      ground when I sit on it. Where to put the dumbhead kinda depends on how
      long your arms are. Mine's made mostly from hemlock and fir, which is light
      (good for carrying around to demos), but light (not as stable as it might
      be).

      Hope that helps,

      Tom R.


      ------------------------------------------------
      Tom Rettie tom@...
      http://www.his.com/~tom/index.html
    • Omer
      Just joined your list as you can tell. I am not in the SCA but a few years ahead of most. I am a member of the COHT an 18th century group. When I lived in
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 28, 2003
            Just joined your list as you can tell.  I am not in the SCA but a few years ahead of most.  I am a member of the COHT an 18th century group.  When I lived in Calf. I was in the SCA but when I moved back to Ga. found that people do not camp at events.  Because I love camping and the night life of an event I have not joined here.   I have found no groups / clubs in my time period that centers on the old ways of woodworking.  What little I know I have had to learn myself and from Mr. Underhills books. 
         
            I have many tools and little time to use or lean to use them, this will be changing soon.  I have built a springpole lathe and have drawn up plans for building a portable wheel lathe.  For trade or sale I build tresel tables, tops, inkle looms and mauls or clubs (so easy to make on the spot and visitors will buy them left and right) .  Our group here is about to start, if the Gov. will get out of the way, to rebuild an 18th century fort that used to stand in this area.  A great fun project but a  little scary.     
         
            Any one on this list in N. Ga.?
         
              YMHS
            Omer, AKA Tavern
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