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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Grandps old tools

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  • Haraldr Bassi
    For those whose family is too healthy to be able to inherit tools, watch the flea markets and yard sales. I have found some truly amazing tools over the years.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 2, 2004
      For those whose family is too healthy to be able to inherit tools, watch
      the flea markets and yard sales. I have found some truly amazing tools
      over the years. I won't pay collectors prices and am always looking for
      servicable tools instead of 'lookers' that the damn collectors are
      screwing to their walls ruining forever.

      As you are just starting down the path of playing with old tools, a piece
      of advice... be careful using a plane after having used a sander, the sand
      paper leaves pieces of stone (carborundum and silica) in the wood that
      then dulls the edges of your tools needlessly. For smoothing and rounding
      over the sharp edges of furniture, don't forget the simple solution of an
      old broken piece of glass. Take a small piece that is comfortable in your
      hand and you can use the sharp edge as a scraper, leaving a very nice
      finish on the piece. And if you have a source of free broken windows, the
      tool is free :)

      Enjoy and keep experimenting with tools... I am quite relishing the times
      I can be in the shop and hear myself breath and the sound of wood slicing
      away instead of the harsh tools.

      Haraldr



      mahee of acre said:
      > I recently made several beds that have glue-up legs. I do not own a
      > lot of tools, but I do have a belt sander. So I sanded and sanded to
      > get the edge smooth after the glue dried. It took forever to sand
      > the edges smooth. Then, after having done half of them I saw the one
      > tool I got from my grandfather, a hand plan. The hand plane took a
      > couple of minutes to do what it took me an hour to do with my belt
      > sander and did a better job too.
      >
      > Sometimes the old tools are the best tool for the job.
      >
      > <just another lesson learned by the inexperienced>
      >
      > your servant,
      > mahee
      >


      --
      Haraldr Bassi, Frosted Hills, East
      haraldr at drakkar org
    • Haraldr Bassi (yahoogroups)
      A plane is the wrong tool for fast material removal in many cases. Depending on the needs, a drawknife is perfect. An experienced user of a sharp drawknife
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 7, 2004
        A plane is the wrong tool for fast material removal in many cases.
        Depending on the needs, a drawknife is perfect. An experienced user of a
        sharp drawknife with a shave bench can do things that an equally
        experienced someone with a vise and a belt sander could not achieve in
        the same time frame. And the real upside is you don't need a mask to be
        able to breath. Or to keep changing belts to get to something remotely
        resembling a finished surface.

        Obviously a hand tool can be found for everything that our medieval
        counterparts did, as they didn't use power tools. It can take a bit of
        experience to become accomplished with some hand tools, and sharpening is
        probably the most important skill to learn.

        An example of a task we needed to accomplish a couple years ago, we were
        using a tapered spoon bit to make the holes in a set of 3 legged trestle
        tables and needed to taper to the same shape the round wood stock we were
        using for legs. I found that even without a shave horse available, just a
        basic vise on my high bench I was able to taper the ends in a few minutes,
        to the exact radius needed with final tuning and smoothing being done with
        a spoke shave and plane. I also ended up with a double handful of long
        shavings instead of a bucket of dust with a cup of it in my lungs.

        If anyone wants to experience a drawknife, spokeshave and shave bench,
        come down to Budgardr camp at Pennsic and let us put the tools into your
        hands.

        Haraldr

        Bill McNutt said:
        > I will say, though, that if it takes more time to remove stock with a
        belt sander than with a hand plane, you need a coarser grit.
        >
        > Will
        >
        > Who currently has seven hand planes he has yet to use. Although the
        irons are sharp.
        >


        --
        Haraldr Bassi, Frosted Hills, East
        yahoo at drakkar org



        --
      • Bill McNutt
        I will say, though, that if it takes more time to remove stock with a belt sander than with a hand plane, you need a coarser grit. Will Who currently has seven
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 1, 2004
          I will say, though, that if it takes more time to remove stock with a
          belt sander than with a hand plane, you need a coarser grit.

          Will

          Who currently has seven hand planes he has yet to use. Although the
          irons are sharp.

          Will
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Haraldr Bassi [mailto:haraldr@...]
          Sent: Friday, July 02, 2004 2:25 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Grandps old tools

          For those whose family is too healthy to be able to inherit tools, watch
          the flea markets and yard sales. I have found some truly amazing tools
          over the years. I won't pay collectors prices and am always looking for
          servicable tools instead of 'lookers' that the damn collectors are
          screwing to their walls ruining forever.

          As you are just starting down the path of playing with old tools, a
          piece
          of advice... be careful using a plane after having used a sander, the
          sand
          paper leaves pieces of stone (carborundum and silica) in the wood that
          then dulls the edges of your tools needlessly. For smoothing and
          rounding
          over the sharp edges of furniture, don't forget the simple solution of
          an
          old broken piece of glass. Take a small piece that is comfortable in
          your
          hand and you can use the sharp edge as a scraper, leaving a very nice
          finish on the piece. And if you have a source of free broken windows,
          the
          tool is free :)

          Enjoy and keep experimenting with tools... I am quite relishing the
          times
          I can be in the shop and hear myself breath and the sound of wood
          slicing
          away instead of the harsh tools.

          Haraldr



          mahee of acre said:
          > I recently made several beds that have glue-up legs. I do not own a
          > lot of tools, but I do have a belt sander. So I sanded and sanded to
          > get the edge smooth after the glue dried. It took forever to sand
          > the edges smooth. Then, after having done half of them I saw the one
          > tool I got from my grandfather, a hand plan. The hand plane took a
          > couple of minutes to do what it took me an hour to do with my belt
          > sander and did a better job too.
          >
          > Sometimes the old tools are the best tool for the job.
          >
          > <just another lesson learned by the inexperienced>
          >
          > your servant,
          > mahee
          >


          --
          Haraldr Bassi, Frosted Hills, East
          haraldr at drakkar org



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