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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Tool for round tenons?

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  • Don Bowen
    ... Check Lee Valley. They have round tendon cutters in many sizes. The smaller (
    Message 1 of 27 , Jul 1, 2004
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      At 7/1/2004, you wrote:
      Has anyone ever seen a tool you can chuck in you lathe to make round
      tenons of a specific size?  Kinda works like a pencil sharpener, but
      you hold the wood and the cutter goes around.  It was used by a guy who
      made windsor chairs.  Anyone know what it's called and/or who sells
      something like that?

      Check Lee Valley.  They have round tendon cutters in many sizes. The smaller (<1")can be chucked in a 1/4 drill.  Others sell the same tool but at slight higher prices.

      Don Bowen
      Awl Knotted Up Woodworking
      Valley Center, CA             http://www.braingarage.com
    • Steve Vaught
      Hi, I believe Rockler sells a set of rounding type planes that would create what you are looking for. They are usually found on the same page as the gustav
      Message 2 of 27 , Jul 1, 2004
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        Hi,
         
        I believe Rockler sells a set of rounding type planes that would create what you are looking for.  They are usually found on the same page as the gustav stickley furniture books.  I think they attach to a drill.
         
        Steve

        James Winkler <jrwinkler@...> wrote:
        Of course..  one way to point dowels on a lathe is to buy a fairly expensive 'pattern follower'...  or copy set.  You could make consistant round tenons that way...  expensive... by consistant...  then again... ya' could learn to turn REALLY WELL...
         
        Chas.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2004 9:17 AM
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Tool for round tenons?


        > The tool is called a stail engine or rounder plane

        Thanks for the tip.  I've seen rounder planes, but all were hand
        cranked.

        > Of course these solutions assume that the tenon is the same size as
        > the rail, producing straight grained round cross sections.

        Here in Ohio, we call that a dowel.  ;)

        Ulrich



                   
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      • Haraldr Bassi
        eBay has been known to have something like that, for hand augers, not lathes. You wouldn t want to be holding a piece of wood when it decides to start spinning
        Message 3 of 27 , Jul 1, 2004
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          eBay has been known to have something like that, for hand augers, not
          lathes. You wouldn't want to be holding a piece of wood when it decides to
          start spinning at 110rpm (slowest I know of for a lathe). Instead, clamp
          the wood in your bench vise, grab your hollow auger and your brace, and
          you are done in a few seconds.

          Here is my search I use for eBay:
          http://search.ebay.com/tenon-cutter-spoke-pointer_W0QQcombineZyQQfromZR14QQfromZR9QQsatitleZQ28Q22tenonQ20cutterQ22Q2cQ20spokeQ20pointerQ22Q29QQsocolumnlayoutZ3QQsosortpropertyZ1

          This is a sample hit that might be what you are looking for, but it really
          looks more like a threading auger than just a hollow tenon cutter.

          http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=4123&item=6105058400&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

          There is also no reason you can't practice until you can make consistent
          tenons on the lathe using your standard lathe tools (scraper) and a
          caliper.

          For the people doing three legged stools, what was the state of the woods
          they were using? Did you use the same wood for the seat as the legs as for
          the braces?

          Did you bake the braces before sizing and inserting them into the legs?

          By dry heating the wood a bit, it will dry and shrink slightly, expanding
          when you have it in the joint, locking the tenon in tighter.

          Haraldr

          Joseph Hayes said:
          >
          > The stool thread has got me thinking about something I saw a while back
          on TV....
          >
          > Has anyone ever seen a tool you can chuck in you lathe to make round
          tenons of a specific size? Kinda works like a pencil sharpener, but you
          hold the wood and the cutter goes around. It was used by a guy who made
          windsor chairs. Anyone know what it's called and/or who sells something
          like that?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Ulrich
          >


          --
          Haraldr Bassi, Frosted Hills, East
          haraldr at drakkar org
        • Tom Rettie
          ... If you re using turner s joints (round tenons), you can t go much less than 2 inches on the posts without producing a very weak joint. The smaller the
          Message 4 of 27 , Jul 2, 2004
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            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, rikwolff@a... wrote:

            > 1.) Don't skimp on the hardness or the diameter of the legs;
            > no less than 2 inches, if you ask me.

            If you're using turner's joints (round tenons), you can't go much
            less than 2 inches on the posts without producing a very weak joint.
            The smaller the diameter of the post, the closer together the
            mortises are and the less wood there is in between them to hold
            things together.

            An alternative is to use a square tenon on one rail and a round one
            on the ajoining rail. The round one goes through the square one,
            locking it in place. It lets you do through tenons (common in
            period) and also leaves a stronger post.

            > The depth of the round mortices for the horizontal pieces is
            > the only source of lateral stability (fighting against sway
            > and what I can only describe as corkscrewing: you attempt a
            > swivel, and the poor joints bend to allow it; next thing
            > you know, CRUNCH).

            When using turner's joints for the top seat rails, I always make the
            tenons long enough that they intersect, and miter them so the ends
            joint together snug. You can stagger the lower rails so they don't
            intersect, or they only partially intersect and lock each other in
            place.

            However you do your tenons, plan on there being some tension in the
            horizontal rails. Even with a drill press, you probably won't bore
            the mortises precisely on every post. This tension can help hold
            everything together though; I've got stools with no glue or pegs,
            they're rock solid on just the internal tension of the rails and
            posts.

            Regards,

            Fin
            (Tom R.)
          • mahee of acre
            I have also seen one where your wood must be cut square, It goes in a square socket that you while pushing the wood through a box with blades in it. This lets
            Message 5 of 27 , Jul 2, 2004
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              I have also seen one where your wood must be cut square, It goes in
              a square socket that you while pushing the wood through a box with
              blades in it. This lets you cut longer tennons if needed. But, it
              does not go on a lathe.

              your servant,
              mahee
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