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Substitute Woods

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  • Bill McNutt
    You think so? I ve always thought that the grain patter of Red Oak more closely resembled brown oak, myself. Will ... From: Avery Austringer
    Message 1 of 29 , May 21, 2004
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      You think so? I've always thought that the grain patter of Red Oak more
      closely resembled brown oak, myself.

      Will

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Avery Austringer [mailto:avery1415@...]
      Sent: Friday, May 21, 2004 1:45 PM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: its gotta' be pricy...

      Ya know, I really like white oak.

      1) It's not pricy.

      2) It looks a lot like English oak

      3) I like it more that I like a lot of exotics.
      Particularly quarter and rift sawn.

      4) It's rot resistant

      5) If I screw up, I can get more! Lots more.

      Avery



      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • Dan Baker
      I know what you mean I picked up some purple heart pieces 2-4 long, 3" wide x 1.25" thick for about $2(canadian) a board foot. I still haven t even
      Message 2 of 29 , May 21, 2004
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        I know what you mean I picked up some purple heart pieces 2-4' long, 3"
        wide x 1.25" thick for about $2(canadian) a board foot.

        I still haven't even figured out what I'm going to do with it yet.

        Mark


        Make a whole lot of Purple Fret and Purple Fretty award medalions and donate
        them to the Middle Kingdom???

        Just a thought.....

        --
        In service to the dream,

        Lord Rhys, Capten gen y Arian Lloer
        Privateer to the Midrealm

        Arafu at dawnsio mewn adlaw
        (Take time to dance in the rain)

        Cymru am byth ("Wales Forever")

        _________________________________________________________________
        Express yourself with the new version of MSN Messenger! Download today -
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      • James W. Pratt, Jr.
        Bull pucky!! I have some very well worn archery butts made from left over stained and painted waterbed lumber. James Cunningham I once told someone who
        Message 3 of 29 , May 21, 2004
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          Bull pucky!! I have some very well worn archery butts made from left over
          stained and painted waterbed lumber.

          James Cunningham

          I once told someone who commented that I build furniture but don't
          paint it, "but if I paint it I can't take it apart and make
          something else out of it" :-)

          -- Gillian Durham
        • Tim Bray
          ... So do I, Avery. Nice stuff, takes a great polish, and the QS can be really flashy. Smells great, too! Cheers, Colin Albion Works Furniture and
          Message 4 of 29 , May 21, 2004
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            >Ya know, I really like white oak.

            So do I, Avery. Nice stuff, takes a great polish, and the QS can be really
            flashy. Smells great, too!

            Cheers,
            Colin


            Albion Works
            Furniture and Accessories
            For the Medievalist!
            http://www.albionworks.net
            http://www.albionworks.com
          • Tim Bray
            ... Not to me! Red oak seems a lot more open-grained and coarser-looking than either White or English oak. None of the American oaks has the same color or
            Message 5 of 29 , May 21, 2004
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              >You think so? I've always thought that the grain patter of Red Oak more
              >closely resembled brown oak, myself.

              Not to me! Red oak seems a lot more open-grained and coarser-looking than
              either White or English oak. None of the American oaks has the same color
              or carve the same as Brown oak, although you can fume white oak to
              approximate the look of English oak. I'm trying to do some detail carving
              on some nice QS WO right now and it's a pain, boy do I wish I had some of
              that nice brown oak... but at least it isn't Red oak, that stuff is awful
              to carve.

              QS red oak looks even less like English oak - the ray figure is quite
              different. Both American White and English Brown tend to have large
              irregular ray flecks, whereas Red has those short patterned flecks.

              Cheers,
              Colin


              Albion Works
              Furniture and Accessories
              For the Medievalist!
              http://www.albionworks.net
              http://www.albionworks.com
            • Bill McNutt
              Naw. But what the limeys want to charge for cutting down a chunk of Sherwood Forest and shipping it to the Colonies! Owie. Will ... From: Tim Bray
              Message 6 of 29 , May 22, 2004
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                Naw. But what the limeys want to charge for cutting down a chunk of
                Sherwood Forest and shipping it to the Colonies!

                Owie.

                Will

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Tim Bray [mailto:tbray@...]
                None of the American oaks has the same color
                or carve the same as Brown oak, although you can fume white oak to
                approximate the look of English oak.
              • windsingersmoon
                A bit of Period trivia regarding bog oak: Seems that originally (in Ireland) it was discovered by the peat cutters who weren t especially interested in it, so
                Message 7 of 29 , May 24, 2004
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                  A bit of Period trivia regarding bog oak:

                  Seems that originally (in Ireland) it was discovered by the peat
                  cutters who weren't especially interested in it, so they pretty much
                  gave it away to woodcarvers. The woodcarvers, always delighted to
                  have some new wood to play with (as w-carver me all-too-well-knows)
                  started making cool stuff out of the oak. They sold those
                  as 'rare' ancient oak, implying special attributes, some bordering
                  on magical even.....they were able to command higher and higher
                  prices for items of bog-oak as word got out and the well-to-do
                  became patrons (?) a bit of keeping up with the rich 'Jones'....
                  The more popular it became, the higher the pieces could command, and
                  the carver was still getting the wood practically for free, with a
                  couple of catches.
                  First of all, it was still rare they could get the wood, as it had
                  to be turned up by the peat cutters, and they didn't turn it up very
                  often.
                  Then, when they eventually realized the kind of prices the carvers
                  were commanding for the finished pieces, the peat cutters wanted a
                  share of the profits so they sold the wood at a dearer price to the
                  carvers.....

                  Men started going out into the bogs with narrow iron poles, up to
                  15 feet long, to press down into the softish peat......when-ever the
                  point on the end of the rod clunked into a chunk of bog oak, (it had
                  a certain 'feel') they would just dig down to it and gather what
                  they could. This proved to be more profitable than peat-cutting,
                  but didn't sit too well with the carvers, who had previously been
                  making a tidy profit on the nearly free wood, were finally getting
                  more offered to them to try and meet the demand for items made from
                  the bog oak, but it was hurting their pocket books, so the more un-
                  scrupulous(sp) started experimenting with ways to artificially
                  produce fake 'bog' oak.....

                  One of these methods is to soak extremely rusty iron in vinegar or
                  old vinegary wine. the end result is a blackish stain.....painted
                  on the finished oak objects, it acts with the tannin in the oak to
                  create the appearance of the bog-oak....allow that to dry well and
                  then follow it up with a firm burnishing with a polished agate, and
                  one winds up with cool hard sheen and looks almost/pretty much
                  indestinguishable from the real thing. i.e. they found a way to
                  cut out the middle man. This all was working pretty well, until
                  eventually some expensive 'bog-oak' object got broken and it was
                  discovered to be a fake. i.e. apparently real bog oak color goes
                  deeply, if not completely into the wood, but the fake stain only
                  penetrates fractions of an inch into the wood. (as my own
                  experiments confirm) But a buyer couldn't very well break a
                  planned purchase to check it for authenticity, so he had to hope the
                  craftsman/seller was honest.....some were.

                  I have a wonderful carved in Ireland box
                  It's about 8-10" square by about 3 inches high
                  It's supposed to be bog oak
                  but for assorted reasons (i.e. places were the joints aren't as true
                  as they originally were) I suspect it may be fake, but I'm not
                  positive, as the carving on the top has cracked noticably, and the
                  black color clearly penetrated into the heart of the
                  crack......unless the crack happened after the carving was done, but
                  before any blackened stain was added..... O LOve the box!! i.e. I
                  would never dream of intentionally attempting to damage it to know
                  for sure about it's ideanity.

                  Anyway, just thought y'all might like to know a bit about the wood.
                  Shara, who's going to bed soon.



                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James Winkler"
                  <jrwinkler@m...> wrote:
                  > It would add whole new meaning to the phrase, "ancient and
                  honorable" wouldn't it?
                  > Chas.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Dear Master Charles....
                  >
                  > No, I am not making your chairs out of Bog Oak. Don't even ask.
                  > --
                  > In service to the dream,
                  >
                  > Lord Rhys, Capten gen y Arian Lloer
                  > Privateer to the Midrealm
                • windsingersmoon
                  Yeah. I m hoarding an entire tree s worth of black walnut I split into rough carving slabs with an antique froe and mallet..... about 16/18 years ago. and
                  Message 8 of 29 , May 24, 2004
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                    Yeah.
                    I'm 'hoarding' an entire tree's worth of black walnut I split into
                    rough carving slabs with an antique froe and mallet.....
                    about 16/18 years ago.
                    and one big slab of planed purple-heart I just bought because it was
                    so 'rich' looking....the wood seller asked what I planned to make of
                    it?
                    I told him 'Nuttin.....I just wanna polish it up pretty and set
                    something (anything) else nice I've carved on it..."
                    He laughed "Can't bear to cut into it huh ?"
                    Right.
                    I also have a section of Mulberry a fellow sca-er gave me.
                    Interesting yellow orange wood.
                    and a bunch of holly I saved from the side of the road.....
                    so much wood for so many projects, and not near enough time.
                    I'm no even counting the slabs I purchased at a number of wood shows
                    way back when.
                    The good news is that I AM finally putting to work some cedar planks
                    about 12-14 inches wide x 6 ' + long x 2+ inches thick...that came
                    saw-milled off of my lord's 100+ yr old family farm.
                    Shara



                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
                    <von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > Dear Master Charles....
                    > > No, I am not making your chairs out of Bog Oak. Don't even ask.
                    >
                    > They also sell English Oak, but the prices aren't listed for that
                    > either.
                    >
                    > I have a piece I bought mail-order a few years ago that cost about
                    $10
                    > a board-foot. I'm afraid to use it. Anyone else have wood they're
                    > "collecting" ?
                    >
                    > Ulrich
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________
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