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Re: [medievalsawdust] 14 th C chests

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  • James Winkler
    Well...there s always the 6-board chest on my website (www.medievalwood.org/charles )... the nice thing about this design
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 6, 2004
      Well...there's always the 6-board chest on my website (www.medievalwood.org/charles)...   the nice thing about this design (specifically for SCA camping) is that its rugged, and, if ya' put em' in your truck right you can still slide the pavillion poles underneath of them...   the original chest was dated closer to the late 16th c... but the basic style was used long before that...
       
      One piece of advise on chest for encampments...  if hauling space is limited in any way... figure out what space you have in your wagon and then build the chests to fit the conveyance...  its amazing how much more wonderful your life can become if you give an inch here...  and add an inch there.  In the original packing mode... I built the chests I use to stand over the rear wheel humps in the bed of my pickup...  just over.  Kept the height down and allowed me to square out the load...
       
      I haven't built any of Diehl's things...  more because I like to try to reproduce what I find in pictures...  but that's just me... so I can't comment on his plans based on first hand experience... 
       
      On the other hand... chances are pretty good that if ya' look through the manuscripts and find a chest ya' like somebody on this list could probably help ya' work out plans to build it...  (hey... start a trend!)
       
      Chas.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 10:58 AM
      Subject: [medievalsawdust] 14 th C chests

      Greetings,

      I am interested in making a few wooden chests for my SCA encampment. I
      am looking at the later part of the 14 th century. I was considering
      using the plans in Diehl's book Medieval Furniture project 10 The
      Paneled Coffer. But I have read some posts on this list that think
      poorly of these books.

      So any comments on these specific plans?

      Any suggestions for plans that I should look at or purchase/

      I have a stack of red oak sitting outside (it has been air drying for
      two winters now) of various thicknesses 1 to 8 cm thick. Before I put
      in the sweat of trimming it and planing it I want to have an idea what
      pieces I need.

      Regards,

      Richard

    • Steve Vaught
      Hi, I would have to check the date but I believe most paneled chest at least according to Penelope Eames don t really show up until the 15th century. Steve
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 6, 2004
        Hi,
         
        I would have to check the date but I believe most paneled chest at least according to Penelope Eames don't really show up until the 15th century.
         
        Steve

        Andrew Lowry <alowry@...> wrote:
        Greetings,

        I am interested in making a few wooden chests for my SCA encampment. I
        am looking at the later part of the 14 th century. I was considering
        using the plans in Diehl's book Medieval Furniture project 10 The
        Paneled Coffer. But I have read some posts on this list that think
        poorly of these books.

        So any comments on these specific plans?

        Any suggestions for plans that I should look at or purchase/

        I have a stack of red oak sitting outside (it has been air drying for
        two winters now) of various thicknesses 1 to 8 cm thick. Before I put
        in the sweat of trimming it and planing it I want to have an idea what
        pieces I need.

        Regards,

        Richard

        Do you Yahoo!?
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      • Tim Bray
        ... That must be in the second book, which I don t have. But I haven t seen anything to indicate that frame-and panel chests were made before the 15th c. For
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 6, 2004
          >I am interested in making a few wooden chests for my SCA encampment. I
          >am looking at the later part of the 14 th century. I was considering
          >using the plans in Diehl's book Medieval Furniture project 10 The
          >Paneled Coffer.

          That must be in the second book, which I don't have. But I haven't seen
          anything to indicate that frame-and panel chests were made before the 15th
          c. For the late 14th I would go with a clamped-front style instead, maybe
          with some carving or ironwork. The book Sir Stanford recommended is an
          excellent resource for these. Don't be put off by the 13th c attribution
          in the title, the same style was in continuous use from early 13th through
          late 16th c.

          >I have a stack of red oak sitting outside (it has been air drying for
          >two winters now) of various thicknesses 1 to 8 cm thick.

          The 1 cm (pretty thin!) should be dry, but the 8 cm might not be. You can
          probably design around this anyway. The clamped-front style is a
          remarkably robust design, despite the "cross-grain situation" in the front
          and back panels. Elongate the peg holes a little in the direction of
          possible shrinkage and you're okay.

          >Before I put
          >in the sweat of trimming it and planing it I want to have an idea what
          >pieces I need.

          A clamped-front chest is not an easy project, there are a lot of pieces
          (depending on how you want to do the ends) and some careful joinery
          (especially the lid batten pin-hinges), so you will want to draw the whole
          thing out to scale and work out the dimensions and joints for each piece
          before you touch any wood. You need thick stuff (about 3 to 4 cm) for the
          legs, medium thick (2 to 2.5 cm) for the front and back panels and the lid
          (and the battens), thin stuff (even as thin as 1 cm) for the end and bottom
          panels, and maybe some more thick stuff for the joined frames on the ends.

          Cheers,
          Colin


          Albion Works
          Furniture and Accessories
          For the Medievalist!
          http://www.albionworks.net
          http://www.albionworks.com
        • langdon_g
          ... snip ... The main problem that many people have with Dan s books are that he is not foremost a woodworker. His plans and construction methods are not
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 7, 2004
            > Greetings,
            >
            > I am interested in making a few wooden chests for my SCA encampment. I
            > am looking at the later part of the 14 th century. I was considering
            > using the plans in Diehl's book Medieval Furniture project 10 The
            > Paneled Coffer. But I have read some posts on this list that think
            > poorly of these books.
            >
            snip
            > Richard

            The main problem that many people have with Dan's books are that he is
            not foremost a woodworker. His plans and construction methods are not
            always complete. I have built some pieces from his first book, but did
            not rely on his directions and I did consider that they were copies of
            furniture in a "medieval style" more than a period reproduction. The
            nice thing about the books is that he does give a single source /
            single piece explanation rather than trying to combine similar pieces
            to follow a medieval mind and create a period piece of furniture.

            Also I just loaded a better picture on my Photos folder (Langdon) that
            shows a hutch style chest under a style of 6-board chest.

            Langdon
          • Dan Baker
            I got a new one I am working on. A rebated clamp front chest. 15th-16th century (mostly 16th) And they seem to be unique to Wales, from what I can find of
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 7, 2004
              I got a new one I am working on. A "rebated clamp front" chest. 15th-16th
              century (mostly 16th) And they seem to be unique to Wales, from what I can
              find of them so far. Big though, about 4 feet long, going to be our new
              garb boxes. I will have pictures and plans soon, I have found at least 4
              examples of it in Museums. Right now I am working from a picture.

              --
              In service to the dream,

              Lord Rhys, Capten gen y Arian Lloer
              Privateer to the Midrealm

              Arafu at dawnsio mewn adlaw
              (Take time to dance in the rain)

              Cymru am byth ("Wales Forever")




              >From: "James Winkler" <jrwinkler@...>
              >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
              >Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] 14 th C chests
              >Date: Tue, 6 Apr 2004 16:05:56 -0500
              >
              >Well...there's always the 6-board chest on my website
              (www.medievalwood.org/charles<http://www.medievalwood.org/charles>)...
              the nice thing about this design (specifically for SCA camping) is that
              its rugged, and, if ya' put em' in your truck right you can still slide the
              pavillion poles underneath of them... the original chest was dated closer
              to the late 16th c... but the basic style was used long before that...
              >
              >One piece of advise on chest for encampments... if hauling space is
              limited in any way... figure out what space you have in your wagon and then
              build the chests to fit the conveyance... its amazing how much more
              wonderful your life can become if you give an inch here... and add an inch
              there. In the original packing mode... I built the chests I use to stand
              over the rear wheel humps in the bed of my pickup... just over. Kept the
              height down and allowed me to square out the load...
              >
              >I haven't built any of Diehl's things... more because I like to try to
              reproduce what I find in pictures... but that's just me... so I can't
              comment on his plans based on first hand experience...
              >
              >On the other hand... chances are pretty good that if ya' look through
              the manuscripts and find a chest ya' like somebody on this list could
              probably help ya' work out plans to build it... (hey... start a trend!)
              >
              >Chas.
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Andrew Lowry<mailto:alowry@...>
              > To: medieval Sawdust<mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2004 10:58 AM
              > Subject: [medievalsawdust] 14 th C chests
              >
              >
              > Greetings,
              >
              > I am interested in making a few wooden chests for my SCA encampment.
              I
              > am looking at the later part of the 14 th century. I was considering
              > using the plans in Diehl's book Medieval Furniture project 10 The
              > Paneled Coffer. But I have read some posts on this list that think
              > poorly of these books.
              >
              > So any comments on these specific plans?
              >
              > Any suggestions for plans that I should look at or purchase/
              >
              > I have a stack of red oak sitting outside (it has been air drying for
              > two winters now) of various thicknesses 1 to 8 cm thick. Before I put
              > in the sweat of trimming it and planing it I want to have an idea
              what
              > pieces I need.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > Richard
              >
              >
              >
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            • sdhunter3
              Just added some pictures of chests I have made over the years. Actually, these are two chests and a casket. Another reference to look at is Ancient Coffers and
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 7, 2004
                Just added some pictures of chests I have made over the years.
                Actually, these are two chests and a casket.

                Another reference to look at is
                Ancient Coffers and Cupboards,
                Their History and Description, F.Roe, Methuen & Co., 1902

                Sir Stanford


                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Lowry <alowry@w...>
                wrote:
                > Greetings,
                >
                > I am interested in making a few wooden chests for my SCA
                encampment. I
                > am looking at the later part of the 14 th century. I was
                considering
                > using the plans in Diehl's book Medieval Furniture project 10 The
                > Paneled Coffer. But I have read some posts on this list that think
                > poorly of these books.
                >
                > So any comments on these specific plans?
                >
                > Any suggestions for plans that I should look at or purchase/
                >
                > I have a stack of red oak sitting outside (it has been air drying
                for
                > two winters now) of various thicknesses 1 to 8 cm thick. Before I
                put
                > in the sweat of trimming it and planing it I want to have an idea
                what
                > pieces I need.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Richard
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