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Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: questions

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  • Tim Bray
    ... Get Practical Casting by Tim McCreight. Best single volume available on the subject, presented in a no-BS style, very easy to understand. Assuming you
    Message 1 of 38 , Mar 23 1:24 PM
      >For all of you cross-craftsmen (wood & metal workers), I need more
      >information on heating and pouring metal.

      Get "Practical Casting" by Tim McCreight. Best single volume available on
      the subject, presented in a no-BS style, very easy to understand.

      Assuming you are casting pewter, it's pretty simple really; I've done it
      with a "ladle" made of a soup can with a coat-hanger-wire handle. Get some
      low-temperature plumber's solder, the solid-wire kind (no
      flux-core!). Melt over a low gas flame on the kitchen stove. (Don't know
      what setting to use if you have an electric range - probably low to
      medium). Pour as soon as all the metal is completely melted and "jiggly" -
      don't keep heating it, bad things can happen if it gets too hot.

      The main safety consideration is to make sure your mold is dry and that
      there is no possible way water can get into the melting can. Steam-blast
      explosions are no fun at all. Put the mold into a pan before casting, so
      any drips or overruns are contained. You should have the mold ready and as
      close as possible to the melting flame, so you don't have to carry the
      molten metal around. Kick the dogs out before doing this. Wear a face shield.

      Good luck and have fun!

      Tim

      Albion Works
      Furniture and Accessories
      For the Medievalist!
      http://www.albionworks.net
      http://www.albionworks.com
    • Tim Bray
      ... Get Practical Casting by Tim McCreight. Best single volume available on the subject, presented in a no-BS style, very easy to understand. Assuming you
      Message 38 of 38 , Mar 23 1:24 PM
        >For all of you cross-craftsmen (wood & metal workers), I need more
        >information on heating and pouring metal.

        Get "Practical Casting" by Tim McCreight. Best single volume available on
        the subject, presented in a no-BS style, very easy to understand.

        Assuming you are casting pewter, it's pretty simple really; I've done it
        with a "ladle" made of a soup can with a coat-hanger-wire handle. Get some
        low-temperature plumber's solder, the solid-wire kind (no
        flux-core!). Melt over a low gas flame on the kitchen stove. (Don't know
        what setting to use if you have an electric range - probably low to
        medium). Pour as soon as all the metal is completely melted and "jiggly" -
        don't keep heating it, bad things can happen if it gets too hot.

        The main safety consideration is to make sure your mold is dry and that
        there is no possible way water can get into the melting can. Steam-blast
        explosions are no fun at all. Put the mold into a pan before casting, so
        any drips or overruns are contained. You should have the mold ready and as
        close as possible to the melting flame, so you don't have to carry the
        molten metal around. Kick the dogs out before doing this. Wear a face shield.

        Good luck and have fun!

        Tim

        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        http://www.albionworks.net
        http://www.albionworks.com
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