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Portable work bench

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  • Lord Alessandro dEste
    Hello All, Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo s. Alessandro d Este
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
      Hello All,
      Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
      bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
      Alessandro d'Este
    • Joseph Hayes
      ... I recall reading about two. I think one was in one of the Roy Underhill books and one is in The Workbench Book. Ulrich
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
        > Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
        > bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.

        I recall reading about two. I think one was in one of the Roy
        Underhill books and one is in "The Workbench Book."

        Ulrich


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      • gmcdavid@comcast.net
        ... Roy Underhill, _The Woodwright s Apprentice_, has a chapter on doing one. You might need to modify it to meet your period requirements. Glenn McDavid
        Message 3 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
          > Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
          > bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.

          Roy Underhill, _The Woodwright's Apprentice_, has a chapter on doing one. You might need to modify it to meet your period requirements.

          Glenn McDavid
          gmcdavid@...
          http://www.winternet.com/~gmcdavid
        • James Winkler
          Well... I made one a while back that is just too much fun (... and has a great look and feel thing going for it...) Basically, I slabbed out a chunk of tree.
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
            Well... I made one a while back that is just too much fun (... and has a great "look and feel" thing going for it...)
             
            Basically, I slabbed out a chunk of tree.  It’s a chunk about 4 feet long, a foot and a half wide and about 3 inches thick.   Then I bodged out four legs (split rail kinda' thing) put round tenons on them and socketed them into the bench board (yer' basic country bench... but its actually a take off on an old roman bench)...  
             
            Now... I've drilled some holes in the surface for putting in pegs (planing stops... ), have some wedges for clamping pieces between the stops, and a hole or two on the sides for the 'vise'.  The vise is a length of rope that is looped around the bench...  a lever is put in the loop and twisted like a tourniquet.  When the necessary tension is achieved... a pin is put in one of the side holes to keep the lever from becoming a cudgel.   The vise is a take of on an Japanese version of this I saw some time ago...  and works pretty well... but to get really good clamping pressure you need to put a block on top of what you're clamping down... it has to do with rope angles and centering the down force and other physics things.
             
            Looks great at an event...  comes apart for travel... packs flat... and is CHEAP...
             
            Chas.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 7:32 AM
            Subject: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

            Hello All,
            Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
            bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
            Alessandro d'Este

          • Arthur Slaughter
            Pertty good late period type bench that folds in Roy Underhill s books Finn ... From: Lord Alessandro dEste To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com Sent:
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
              Pertty good late  period type bench that folds in Roy Underhill's books
              Finn
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 7:32 AM
              Subject: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

              Hello All,
              Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
              bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
              Alessandro d'Este

            • Bill McNutt
              All of the benches I ve seen in illustrations, illuminations, and woodcuts have just been splayed-leg tables. Will ... From: Lord Alessandro dEste
              Message 6 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                All of the benches I've seen in illustrations, illuminations, and
                woodcuts have just been splayed-leg tables.

                Will

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Lord Alessandro dEste [mailto:avalonbear@...]
                Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 8:32 AM
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                Hello All,
                Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
                bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
                Alessandro d'Este




                Yahoo! Groups Links
              • Dianne & Greg Stucki
                ... From: To: Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 9:29 AM Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work
                Message 7 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <gmcdavid@...>
                  To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 9:29 AM
                  Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench


                  > > Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
                  > > bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
                  >
                  > Roy Underhill, _The Woodwright's Apprentice_, has a chapter on doing one.
                  You might need to modify it to meet your period requirements.

                  I have this book on the way to me from an eBay auction. The more I hear
                  about it, the more excited I get!

                  Laurensa
                  >
                  > Glenn McDavid
                  > gmcdavid@...
                  > http://www.winternet.com/~gmcdavid
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Arthur Slaughter
                  Great book if you remember that Roy is a woodworker in teh manner of the period of the American Rev. Though basic techniques are the same back to Medieval
                  Message 8 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                    Great book if you remember that Roy is a woodworker in teh manner of the period of the American Rev. Though basic techniques are the same back to Medieval times, some specifics (like twist type augers) are very late if not post period.  I love the books and have all but the last which my local Borders fails to stock and I haven't ordered from the publisher yet.  All in all I would say the books are well worth the price.
                    Finn
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 3:03 PM
                    Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: <gmcdavid@...>
                    To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 9:29 AM
                    Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench


                    > > Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
                    > > bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
                    >
                    > Roy Underhill, _The Woodwright's Apprentice_, has a chapter on doing one.
                    You might need to modify it to meet your period requirements.

                    I have this book on the way to me from an eBay auction. The more I hear
                    about it, the more excited I get!

                    Laurensa
                    >
                    > Glenn McDavid
                    > gmcdavid@...
                    > http://www.winternet.com/~gmcdavid
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                  • maeryk
                    Underhill has a pretty good design (and instructions on how to build it, starting with the tree) in one of the woodwright books. Maeryk ... From: Lord
                    Message 9 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                      Underhill has a pretty good design (and instructions on how to build it,
                      starting with the tree) in
                      one of the "woodwright" books.

                      Maeryk

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Lord Alessandro dEste" <avalonbear@...>
                      To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 8:32 AM
                      Subject: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench


                      > Hello All,
                      > Does anyone have plans or know of any links that have a portable work
                      > bench. Im wanting to make one to use at Demo's.
                      > Alessandro d'Este
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • C N Schwartz
                      Sure, but that is limiting. He likes the gadgets of the 19th C, so modern and cool, but to say he isn t period is off. Remember, when you say American
                      Message 10 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                         
                         
                        Sure, but that is limiting.  He likes the gadgets of the 19th C, so modern and cool, but to say he isn't period is off.  Remember, when you say American Revolution, while true, it's ALL the N American colonial era.  That means mid 1600s.  Some Scadians count period up to 1600.  (I prefer 1492 as my stop date, but... that's neither here nor there.)
                         
                        Early colonial Americans are doing a lot of joinery with riven boards. 
                         
                        The tool tradition is leaning heavily toward English style, With some Continental influences in Pennsylvania, New Amsterdam, and Quebec.  Bench planes from the US in this era are indistinguishable from the bench planes in some of the Medieval illustrations in this group.
                         
                        And tool innovation wasn't exactly moving at a brisk pace.  Early American colonial would look increasingly Medieval because of the availability of good trees.  A simple nailed bench is a simple nailed bench.  Not very discernable for the past 800 years or so.
                         
                        So don't knock Roy's relevance to period methods.  He ain't perfect, true, but he is not far off.  Comparing Roy to Period is less like comparing Pentium 4's to Commodore Vic-20's and more like Comparing Pentium 4's to Pentium 2's.
                         
                         
                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Arthur Slaughter [mailto:fion@...]
                        Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 4:19 PM
                        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                        Great book if you remember that Roy is a woodworker in teh manner of the period of the American Rev. Though basic techniques are the same back to Medieval times, some specifics (like twist type augers) are very late if not post period.  I love the books and have all but the last which my local Borders fails to stock and I haven't ordered from the publisher yet.  All in all I would say the books are well worth the price.
                        Finn
                         
                      • maeryk
                        The only thing is he does, in fact, have a penchant for riven boards. I have yet to see any good explanation against, (and a few good explanations FOR) sawing
                        Message 11 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                          The only thing is he does, in fact, have a penchant for riven boards. I have yet to see any good explanation against, (and a few good explanations FOR) sawing operations, on a large scale, in europe towards the end of the period. THere are plenty of bills of lading and purchase records extant for "boards" not "trees" coming in as cargo..
                           
                          I think some people make a jump to riving, pit-sawing, and other less large-scale methods in the new world and back-connect it to period, but if you look at it logically, here we were trying to get settlements built before winter came, there the settlements were established cities.. people had the time to wait for something from the sawmill, rather than needing it in the "fastest way possible".
                           
                          Or, I could be totally of base. :P
                           
                          Maeryk
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 7:25 PM
                          Subject: RE: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                           
                           
                          Sure, but that is limiting.  He likes the gadgets of the 19th C, so modern and cool, but to say he isn't period is off.  Remember, when you say American Revolution, while true, it's ALL the N American colonial era.  That means mid 1600s.  Some Scadians count period up to 1600.  (I prefer 1492 as my stop date, but... that's neither here nor there.)
                           
                          Early colonial Americans are doing a lot of joinery with riven boards. 
                           
                          The tool tradition is leaning heavily toward English style, With some Continental influences in Pennsylvania, New Amsterdam, and Quebec.  Bench planes from the US in this era are indistinguishable from the bench planes in some of the Medieval illustrations in this group.
                           
                          And tool innovation wasn't exactly moving at a brisk pace.  Early American colonial would look increasingly Medieval because of the availability of good trees.  A simple nailed bench is a simple nailed bench.  Not very discernable for the past 800 years or so.
                           
                          So don't knock Roy's relevance to period methods.  He ain't perfect, true, but he is not far off.  Comparing Roy to Period is less like comparing Pentium 4's to Commodore Vic-20's and more like Comparing Pentium 4's to Pentium 2's.
                           
                           
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Arthur Slaughter [mailto:fion@...]
                          Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 4:19 PM
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                          Great book if you remember that Roy is a woodworker in teh manner of the period of the American Rev. Though basic techniques are the same back to Medieval times, some specifics (like twist type augers) are very late if not post period.  I love the books and have all but the last which my local Borders fails to stock and I haven't ordered from the publisher yet.  All in all I would say the books are well worth the price.
                          Finn
                           

                        • Arthur Slaughter
                          I appreciate your statement. And reiterate Roy Rocks. Which I belive is the point you missed in the way I made my statement. In the period I study dovetail
                          Message 12 of 19 , Mar 10, 2004
                            I appreciate your statement. And reiterate Roy Rocks. Which I belive is the point you missed in the way I made my statement.  In the period I study dovetail joinery is not used, I still love to see someone do nice hand cut dovetails,
                            Finn
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 6:25 PM
                            Subject: RE: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                             
                             
                            Sure, but that is limiting.  He likes the gadgets of the 19th C, so modern and cool, but to say he isn't period is off.  Remember, when you say American Revolution, while true, it's ALL the N American colonial era.  That means mid 1600s.  Some Scadians count period up to 1600.  (I prefer 1492 as my stop date, but... that's neither here nor there.)
                             
                            Early colonial Americans are doing a lot of joinery with riven boards. 
                             
                            The tool tradition is leaning heavily toward English style, With some Continental influences in Pennsylvania, New Amsterdam, and Quebec.  Bench planes from the US in this era are indistinguishable from the bench planes in some of the Medieval illustrations in this group.
                             
                            And tool innovation wasn't exactly moving at a brisk pace.  Early American colonial would look increasingly Medieval because of the availability of good trees.  A simple nailed bench is a simple nailed bench.  Not very discernable for the past 800 years or so.
                             
                            So don't knock Roy's relevance to period methods.  He ain't perfect, true, but he is not far off.  Comparing Roy to Period is less like comparing Pentium 4's to Commodore Vic-20's and more like Comparing Pentium 4's to Pentium 2's.
                             
                             
                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Arthur Slaughter [mailto:fion@...]
                            Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 4:19 PM
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                            Great book if you remember that Roy is a woodworker in teh manner of the period of the American Rev. Though basic techniques are the same back to Medieval times, some specifics (like twist type augers) are very late if not post period.  I love the books and have all but the last which my local Borders fails to stock and I haven't ordered from the publisher yet.  All in all I would say the books are well worth the price.
                            Finn
                             

                          • kjworz@comcast.net
                            Me too. My SCA A&S life can be summed up as The Quest to Find 13th C Dovetail Examples in Northern Europe -- -Chris Schwartz, Ex-Brewer Stealth #97 Silver
                            Message 13 of 19 , Mar 11, 2004
                              Me too. My SCA A&S life can be summed up as "The Quest to Find 13th C Dovetail Examples in Northern Europe"



                              --
                              -Chris Schwartz, Ex-Brewer
                              Stealth #97
                              Silver Spring, MD
                            • kjworz@comcast.net
                              Well, a board is a board, whether sawn at the pit, or riven from the log at the felling site and dressed (made generally smoother and squarer with broad
                              Message 14 of 19 , Mar 11, 2004
                                Well, a board is a board, whether sawn at the pit, or riven from the log at the felling site and 'dressed' (made generally smoother and squarer with broad hatchet and drawknife) then stored for seasoning.

                                The difference between the boards is, one is quick and easy but requires good trees and is wasteful, the other is laborious but often necessary for gnarlier trees and lumber.


                                --
                                -Chris Schwartz, Ex-Brewer
                                Stealth #97
                                Silver Spring, MD
                              • Bill McNutt
                                Where is northern Europe, other than not spain, I mean. Will ... From: kjworz@comcast.net [mailto:kjworz@comcast.net] Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 10:19
                                Message 15 of 19 , Mar 11, 2004
                                  Where is "northern Europe," other than "not spain," I mean.

                                  Will

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: kjworz@... [mailto:kjworz@...]
                                  Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 10:19 AM
                                  To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench

                                  Me too. My SCA A&S life can be summed up as "The Quest to Find 13th C
                                  Dovetail Examples in Northern Europe"



                                  --
                                  -Chris Schwartz, Ex-Brewer
                                  Stealth #97
                                  Silver Spring, MD




                                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                                • kjworz@comcast.net
                                  Well, not Spain, Italy, Greece..... Not the Mediterranean. In other words, not in direct contact with the Moors. My conjecture being that there is distinct
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Mar 11, 2004
                                    Well, not Spain, Italy, Greece.....

                                    Not the Mediterranean. In other words, not in direct contact with the Moors. My conjecture being that there is distinct possibility that the more advanced at the time Moors never stopped making dovetails. Same thing with some Italian Proto City-States. I want proof that the more backwards Northern European types kept the skill through the 'Dark Ages' and beyond. Or rediscovered, and used it relatively widely, before the 13th Century.

                                    Partial list of North Europe:
                                    Germany
                                    Scandinavia
                                    British Isles
                                    Lowlands
                                    Normandy (and other parts of Northern France)
                                    Poland
                                    Czechoslavakia
                                    Switzerland

                                    (or at least the in-period geographical location those modern day names represent)

                                    If I find that only the kingdom of Bohemia never stopped using dovetails from Roman times on, then I will develop a persona around Bohemia....

                                    I'd really prefer the British Isles though. Easier to research, and my period tools are more British in style.



                                    --
                                    -Chris Schwartz, Ex-Brewer
                                    Stealth #97
                                    Silver Spring, MD
                                    > Where is "northern Europe," other than "not spain," I mean.
                                    >
                                    > Will
                                    >
                                    > -----Original Message-----
                                    > From: kjworz@... [mailto:kjworz@...]
                                    > Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 10:19 AM
                                    > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Portable work bench
                                    >
                                    > Me too. My SCA A&S life can be summed up as "The Quest to Find 13th C
                                    > Dovetail Examples in Northern Europe"
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    > -Chris Schwartz, Ex-Brewer
                                    > Stealth #97
                                    > Silver Spring, MD
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
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                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
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                                  • Tim Bray
                                    ... I always thought the boundary between Northern and Southern Europe was the Alps. Wouldn t that put Spain in the North? Cheers, Colin
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Mar 11, 2004
                                      >Where is "northern Europe," other than "not spain," I mean.

                                      I always thought the boundary between Northern and Southern Europe was the
                                      Alps. Wouldn't that put Spain in the North?

                                      Cheers,
                                      Colin
                                    • Bill McNutt
                                      Heh. Guess it wood. Will ... From: Tim Bray [mailto:tbray@mcn.org] Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 1:03 PM To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com Subject:
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Mar 11, 2004
                                        Heh. Guess it wood.

                                        Will

                                        -----Original Message-----
                                        From: Tim Bray [mailto:tbray@...]
                                        Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2004 1:03 PM
                                        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [medievalsawdust] Northern?


                                        >Where is "northern Europe," other than "not spain," I mean.

                                        I always thought the boundary between Northern and Southern Europe was
                                        the
                                        Alps. Wouldn't that put Spain in the North?

                                        Cheers,
                                        Colin




                                        Yahoo! Groups Links
                                      • Lord Alessandro dEste
                                        ... has a great look and feel thing going for it...) ... Thank you Chas, Im off to the Mill to find some slab. I have a Plan for your desighn that I think
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Mar 12, 2004
                                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James Winkler"
                                          <jrwinkler@m...> wrote:
                                          > Well... I made one a while back that is just too much fun (... and
                                          has a great "look and feel" thing going for it...)

                                          > Chas.
                                          Thank you Chas, Im off to the Mill to find some slab. I have a Plan
                                          for your desighn that I think Master John Paul Devereaux is going to
                                          just love what will be coming his way "Simple Day".
                                          IYS
                                          Sandro
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