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Re: [medievalsawdust] next discussion question

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  • Joseph Hayes
    ... I d go with common domestics of the same genus in an attempt to get equivalant properties. Although Querqus robur is available in the US, it s expensive
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 7, 2002
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      > You're making a piece. In period they would have used X, which is
      > all well and good if you happen to have ready access to it, but in
      > fact all you have access to is the common domestics and the
      > occasional African or Australian exotic that the guys at the local
      > hardwood shop sells. What species do you use?

      I'd go with common domestics of the same genus in an attempt to get
      equivalant properties. Although Querqus robur is available in the US,
      it's expensive ($10 per board foot). Querqus rubra is probably easiest
      to obtain (you can but it a Lowe's), but I think Querqus alba is a
      better substitute.

      Ulrich


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    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      ... I d do a little research and find out if I can get the right wood at a price I can afford from some supplyer off the beaten path, if the item being made
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 7, 2002
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        > You're making a piece. In period they would have
        > used X, which is all
        > well and good if you happen to have ready access to
        > it, but in fact all
        > you have access to is the common domestics and the
        > occasional African or
        > Australian exotic that the guys at the local
        > hardwood shop sells. What
        > species do you use?
        >
        > Avery
        >

        I'd do a little research and find out if I
        can get the 'right' wood at a price I can afford
        from some supplyer off the beaten path, if the
        item being made is important enough to 'deserve'
        one specific type of wood ( maybe a english yew
        longbow... that kinda narrows down the choices
        a bit.... )

        If I can't get it or can't afford it or
        justify the expense ( based on what it is ),
        then I'd research the properties of the 'right' wood
        and try to find something that matches as many
        characteristics as I can. Usually there is
        some other choice that has enough similar
        properites to make a suitable replacement.

        Example.
        European Oak vs. White Oak vs. Red Oak

        All have similar visual characteristics, but
        White oak has a finer grain while red oak can
        chip and splinter....But white oak is less
        common and therefore more expensive.



        =====
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '

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      • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
        ... Ok how about this variation... You can get the right wood, but only dry and the project wants green wood.... Whatcha do then? ===== Baron Conal O hAirt /
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 7, 2002
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          > Remember, you're turning green. note how
          > it dries and ages???

          Ok how about this variation...

          You can get the 'right' wood, but
          only dry and the project wants green
          wood....
          Whatcha do then?

          =====
          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '

          __________________________________________________
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        • Dan Baker
          I was doing research for my last A&S project and found a viking ship burial with artifacts all made out of oak. On another ship burial, with almost identical
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 7, 2002
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            I was doing research for my last A&S project and found a viking ship burial
            with artifacts all made out of oak. On another ship burial, with almost
            identical items, they were all made out of beech. Now, there has to be a
            reason for that. My assumption was that the first artisan had access to a
            ready supply of oak, while the other had access to a ready supply of beech.
            Certainly in modern times we use specific woods for specific projects. But
            did they in period? My guess is not nearly as much. If I were a perion
            craftsman making a use item rather then a show item, my first concern for
            the material is that is met the weight or strength that I needed for that
            project.


            --
            YIS,

            Lord Rhys, Capten gen y Arian Lloer
            Privateer to the Midrealm

            Arafu at dawnsio mewn adlaw
            ...Take time to dance in the rain...



            >
            >You're making a piece. In period they would have used X, which is all
            >well and good if you happen to have ready access to it, but in fact all
            >you have access to is the common domestics and the occasional African or
            >Australian exotic that the guys at the local hardwood shop sells. What
            >species do you use?
            >
            >Avery
            >
            >


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