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Re: [medievalsawdust] Cedar drying and uses

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  • Gary Halstead
    Dragano Abbruciati de Genoese wrote: ... If you can get decent boards out of those logs, then cedar chests would be appropriate. The Italians had a
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2004
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      Dragano Abbruciati de Genoese wrote:
      <snip>
      > Question 2: Cedar, as you know, is aromatic and beautiful. What
      > would be you suggestions as to uses for this wood? Presently, I have
      > the skills of a rough carpenter (DAMN rough!), so try to keep that in
      > mind.
      >
      > Dragano

      If you can get decent boards out of those logs, then cedar chests would
      be appropriate. The Italians had a nice trade importing cedar from
      elsewhere in the Med and shipping finished chests to northern Europe.

      Ranulf
    • Gordon Fridenberg
      I haven t done this myself but have read up on it a bit. You will want to coat the ends of the logs asap to slow the drying down. Most of the moisture is
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2004
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        I haven't done this myself but have read up on it a bit. You will want
        to coat the ends of the logs asap to slow the drying down. Most of the
        moisture is lost through the ends of the log and if they dry to fast they
        will split. There are several web pages on the subject, but I'm at work
        right now and don't have time to look them up.
        I have also been told that the sawdust form Ceder will do nasty things to
        you if you breathe it.

        Robert


        >From: "Dragano Abbruciati de Genoese" <dragano_abbruciati@...>
        >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [medievalsawdust] Cedar drying and uses
        >Date: Mon, 01 Mar 2004 19:01:19 -0000
        >
        >In spite of the recent post about woodworkers not felling their own
        >trees. I have a question on exactly that. I was helping a friend
        >clear some of the trees around his fenceline over the weekend.
        >Included in our deforestation were three 12" diameter cedar trees.
        >The bulk of these three specimens came home with me and I would like
        >to take these logs and turn them into something for my SCA kit.
        >
        >Question 1: How do I dry the wood? If I remember correctly, logs
        >are split into boards and then dried, but I'm not really sure from
        >whence that memory comes.
        >
        >Question 2: Cedar, as you know, is aromatic and beautiful. What
        >would be you suggestions as to uses for this wood? Presently, I have
        >the skills of a rough carpenter (DAMN rough!), so try to keep that in
        >mind.
        >
        >Dragano
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

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      • James W. Pratt, Jr.
        Let me help here. In some period logs were sawn not split You will get the most out of the log by taking them to a local band saw mill(see county forester for
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 1, 2004
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          Let me help here. In some period logs were sawn not split You will get the
          most out of the log by taking them to a local band saw mill(see county
          forester for local sawmills) 12" is a big cedar I am not sure of the
          specific items that cedar was used for "in period". Use them for what may.
          To dry them get it sawn or split asap and sticker it(one inch square dry
          stickers every two feet in a not more that a three feet wide stack) One year
          drying time per inch of cut thickness. Ceder will dry faster..

          James Cunningham
          Sometime modern sawyer

          > Included in our deforestation were three 12" diameter cedar trees.
          > The bulk of these three specimens came home with me and I would like
          > to take these logs and turn them into something for my SCA kit.
          >
          > Question 1: How do I dry the wood? If I remember correctly, logs
          > are split into boards and then dried, but I'm not really sure from
          > whence that memory comes.
          >
          > Question 2: Cedar, as you know, is aromatic and beautiful. What
          > would be you suggestions as to uses for this wood? Presently, I have
          > the skills of a rough carpenter (DAMN rough!), so try to keep that in
          > mind.
          >
          > Dragano
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • James W. Pratt, Jr.
          Pictures? I cannot seem to get into the yahoogroups picture area. James Cunningham
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 1, 2004
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            Pictures? I cannot seem to get into the yahoogroups picture area.

            James Cunningham
            > If you can get decent boards out of those logs, then cedar chests would
            > be appropriate. The Italians had a nice trade importing cedar from
            > elsewhere in the Med and shipping finished chests to northern Europe.
            >
            > Ranulf
          • Tim Bray
            ... Save yourself some money and do what the pros do: Paint the ends with a latex primer. Lots cheaper and easier to use than wax, and does the same job.
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 1, 2004
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              >Forgot that part. Coat the ends with wax to seal them.

              Save yourself some money and do what the pros do: Paint the ends with a
              latex primer. Lots cheaper and easier to use than wax, and does the same job.

              Cheers,
              Colin


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