Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [medievalsawdust] folding chairs and more

Expand Messages
  • Bill McNutt
    And, just for grins, may have been refinished, restored, or repaired multiple times over the ages. Will ... From: Dan Baker [mailto:Capten_Rhys@hotmail.com]
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 27, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      And, just for grins, may have been refinished, restored, or repaired
      multiple times over the ages.

      Will

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Dan Baker [mailto:Capten_Rhys@...]

      Even if you have a physical object, a chair or a box, or a bed, there is

      always the chance it was a totally unique object in it's time and
      reflects
      zero of what was common practice.
    • James Winkler
      ... always the chance it was a totally unique object in it s time and reflects zero of what was common practice.
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 27, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Rhys wrote:
         
        >>  Even if you have a physical object, a chair or a box, or
        a bed, there is
        always the chance it was a totally unique object in it's time and reflects
        zero of what was common practice.  <<
         
        I'm not so sure... most of what I see seems to have a 'logical context' to its time.  There may be some unique aspects to a piece but don't think I've seen anything that would fall into the 'totally unique' classification.  The various viking beds are a great example...  everybody has seen the one with the carved dragon's heads on the headboard posts...  interestingly, that... according what I've been shown (... and I think Rys was the one who showed me this...) was the only one of the multitude of beds found that had the dragon's head carvings...  the rest of the beds were a simpler post design... yet, even with this embellishment, the general architecture of the beds are all consistent.
         
        I think there may be some 'jumping off points' in design where... for a variety of reasons and influences, artisans depart the standard playing field and make a well known object in a radically different manner... but even with that... I'm thinkin' that there is precedence somewhere. 
         
        But, like a paleontologist...  the trick is to find the missing links... if they exist.  I for one am not a great believer that ideas, like Athena, spring full-born from the forehead of their creators...  it see things a evolutionary vs. revolutionary (at least until the 20th c.)...   While I don't discount the possibility that a piece was unique in its time and place...  I think the PROBABILITY is that it has roots... and the trick is to understand where they lead to... or from.
         
        Chas.
      • Dragano Abbruciati
        And that brings up another question. How much artistic license can an SCA craftsman take in his or her design before the piece is considered no longer
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 27, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          And that brings up another question.  How much "artistic license" can an SCA craftsman take in his or her design before the piece is considered no longer period?

          James Winkler <jrwinkler@...> wrote:
          Rhys wrote:
           
          >>  Even if you have a physical object, a chair or a box, or a bed, there is
          always the chance it was a totally unique object in it's time and reflects
          zero of what was common practice.  <<
           
          I'm not so sure... most of what I see seems to have a 'logical context' to its time.  There may be some unique aspects to a piece but don't think I've seen anything that would fall into the 'totally unique' classification.  The various viking beds are a great example...  everybody has seen the one with the carved dragon's heads on the headboard posts...  interestingly, that... according what I've been shown (... and I think Rys was the one who showed me this...) was the only one of the multitude of beds found that had the dragon's head carvings...  the rest of the beds were a simpler post design... yet, even with this embellishment, the general architecture of the beds are all consistent.
           
          I think there may be some 'jumping off points' in design where... for a variety of reasons and influences, artisans depart the standard playing field and make a well known object in a radically different manner... but even with that... I'm thinkin' that there is precedence somewhere. 
           
          But, like a paleontologist...  the trick is to find the missing links... if they exist.  I for one am not a great believer that ideas, like Athena, spring full-born from the forehead of their creators...  it see things a evolutionary vs. revolutionary (at least until the 20th c.)...   While I don't discount the possibility that a piece was unique in its time and place...  I think the PROBABILITY is that it has roots... and the trick is to understand where they lead to... or from.
           
          Chas.


          Do you Yahoo!?
          Get better spam protection with Yahoo! Mail
        • Gary Halstead
          Period isn t a binary condition. My personal criteria involves looking at materials, decoration, and technique. The more each of those departs from
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 27, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            "Period" isn't a binary condition. My personal criteria involves
            looking at materials, decoration, and technique. The more each of those
            departs from examples from a particular place and time, the less
            "period" the piece is. Materials and technique are pretty easy to
            evaluate - a boarded oak chest is period, melamine with knockdown
            connectors isn't. Decoration's a little tougher. If you stick with one
            artistic style (e.g. Gothic) I won't squawk, even if you pull the design
            elements from different pieces. If you start mixing Gothic with Celtic
            knotwork, Renaissance putti, and/or Chinese dragons, I'll raise an eyebrow.

            For example, my current project is a 16th century Italian credenza. The
            decoration is taken from a number of mid-late 16th north Italian
            credenzas, but doesn't reproduce any of them exactly. I don't think the
            finished product would look out of place in a home of the period (at
            least I hope it wouldn't).

            Ranulf
            www.medievalwoodworking.com


            Dragano Abbruciati wrote:
            > And that brings up another question. How much "artistic license" can
            > an SCA craftsman take in his or her design before the piece is
            > considered no longer period?
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.