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Gently steering the conversation away from personal disfigurement

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  • Avery Austringer
    Enough with the and when we finally got him out of the car he was trying to scream and didn t have a face...hey aren t you going to eat that? stories, eh?
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 25, 2004
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      Enough with the "and when we finally got him out of
      the car he was trying to scream and didn't have a
      face...hey aren't you going to eat that?" stories, eh?
      (Bonus points if you can name that flick.)

      Anyhow, for your amusement, I've posted something in
      the photo section. All I have to say is how painful
      could it have been if I stopped and took pictures.

      Now, someone asked about tools and getting started.
      The real question is, what is it, exactly, that you
      want to do? Autentic work with authentic tools?
      Something better than Coleman for camping out with?
      Quality home furnishings that look medieval using
      modern technique? There's a lot of variability based
      on this answer.

      Avery
    • James Winkler
      Nice try Avery... but they seem to be on a roll... I m waiting for the I walked to the hospital... uphill.... both ways... part to start... Chas. Flick: No
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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        Nice try Avery... but they seem to be on a roll...  I'm waiting for the "I walked to the hospital... uphill.... both ways..." part to start...
         
        Chas.
         
        Flick: No clue... but a google search of "aren't you going to eat that" gets 99 hits... none of which match the first part of the quote.  I'm guessin' a Mel Gibson movie though... sounds like a Mel Gibson line... 
        Enough with the "and when we finally got him out of
        the car he was trying to scream and didn't have a
        face...hey aren't you going to eat that?" stories, eh?
        (Bonus points if you can name that flick.)
      • Dragano Abbruciati
        I believe it was me who asked that question. My immediate interest is in using period tools (they can be new as long as they are a reasonable facsimile of what
        Message 3 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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          I believe it was me who asked that question.
           
          My immediate interest is in using period tools (they can be new as long as they are a reasonable facsimile of what was used in the 14th Century) to create period objects (seating, camp beds, other tools, etc.) that can be used at SCA events.  Eventually I might be interested in entering A&S competitions and, eventually, I might be intersted in merchanting that which I have created.
           
          Does that give you an idea of what I'm looking for?
           
          Dragano

          Avery Austringer <avery1415@...> wrote:
          Now, someone asked about tools and getting started.
          The real question is, what is it, exactly, that you
          want to do?  Autentic work with authentic tools?
          Something better than Coleman for camping out with?
          Quality home furnishings that look medieval using
          modern technique?  There's a lot of variability based
          on this answer.

          Avery


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        • mahee of acre
          I was feeling really bad one day and so I walked to the hospital. It was about 2 miles from my house, and up hill most of the way. They took my temperature and
          Message 4 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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            I was feeling really bad one day and so I walked to the hospital. It
            was about 2 miles from my house, and up hill most of the way. They
            took my temperature and found it to be 105. The hospital has a really
            bad rep, so when they said they were going to admit me, I told them
            that if I could walk there, I could walk myself home again as well. I
            did. I walked down the long hill and back up the next to my house. It
            was just under 110 out that day. Turned out to be food poisoning,
            sorry not a shop accident.

            when I did cut my thumb in half I had to drive myself to the
            hospital. they kept me in the waiting room until they notice half an
            hour later that I was going into shock. That was fun too<g>.

            your servant,
            mahee

            ps. my life has been so weird that I do not have to make up stories
            :-)>
            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James Winkler"
            <jrwinkler@m...> wrote:
            > Nice try Avery... but they seem to be on a roll... I'm waiting for
            the "I walked to the hospital... uphill.... both ways..." part to
            start...
            >
            > Chas.
            >
            > Flick: No clue... but a google search of "aren't you going to eat
            that" gets 99 hits... none of which match the first part of the
            quote. I'm guessin' a Mel Gibson movie though... sounds like a Mel
            Gibson line...
            >
            > Enough with the "and when we finally got him out of
            > the car he was trying to scream and didn't have a
            > face...hey aren't you going to eat that?" stories, eh?
            > (Bonus points if you can name that flick.)
          • Don Bowen
            I do believe that a safety discussion every now and again is good for all of us. It helps remind us that we do need to be careful. I am attempting to build a
            Message 5 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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              I do believe that a safety discussion every now and again is good for all
              of us. It helps remind us that we do need to be careful. I am attempting
              to build a professional woodworking business and one of my best clients is
              a bookbinder. He brings me such interesting projects that I give him a big
              cut on the labor when I can. I also like visiting his shop where he will
              dig out the oldest books to show me. His restoration is as period correct
              as possible and the customer will allow. He has let me look though several
              medieval books over the years. A job coming up is to restore a book press
              from sometime in the mid 1700s or earlier, it has a hand cut wrought iron
              screw.

              A little drift away there. He asked me to cut some book press plates for
              him, 1X12 and 9X6. A very quick job. I was cutting them up and setting
              the finished pieces aside when one got caught between the fence and blade
              and went flying. Just a little cut on my wrist and a big reminder. After
              that accident and reading this thread I became more aware.
              (again) Yesterday I had to cut some short pieces to build a drying rack
              but this time I used a spacer block and thought things through well before
              hand. No accident and an enjoyable time in the shop with a little Utah
              Phillips in the background. I do like this business and thanks for the
              reminder.

              Don Bowen
              Awl Knotted Up Woodworking
              Valley Center, CA http://www.braingarage.com
            • Bill McNutt
              I toy with this concept myself from time to time, but I m afraid that if I try to make the creation of sawdust my day job, it ll become work, and I won t enjoy
              Message 6 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                I toy with this concept myself from time to time, but I'm afraid that if
                I try to make the creation of sawdust my day job, it'll become work, and
                I won't enjoy it any more.

                Who all here has gone pro? How did it work out?

                Will

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Don Bowen [mailto:donb@...]

                It helps remind us that we do need to be careful. I am attempting
                to build a professional woodworking business and one of my best clients
                is
                a bookbinder.
              • Joseph Hayes
                ... At my wife s urging, I tried to go pro when I got laid off from WorldCom in 2001. After seeing what people charged for all that pine-based crap furniture
                Message 7 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                  --- Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
                  > Who all here has gone pro? How did it work out?

                  At my wife's urging, I tried to go pro when I got laid off from
                  WorldCom in 2001. After seeing what people charged for all that
                  pine-based crap furniture in the local craft stores, I tried to see if
                  that was something I could do. I found that most of them would not let
                  me undercut the other merchants.

                  In a way, I'm glad it worked out like it did. I was afraid I'd hate
                  woodworking if it became a job. Even now, I sell combat crossbows but
                  won't take any money till they're done. I tell everyone up front that
                  this is a hobby, I make no promises when it will be done, and they
                  won't hurt my feelings if they want to buy from someone else.

                  Ulrich


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                • maeryk
                  ... By god! Thats MOOSE TURD PIE!.. Shore is good tho! hehe. Maeryk
                  Message 8 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                    >No accident and an enjoyable time in the shop with a little Utah
                    >Phillips in the background.

                    "By god! Thats MOOSE TURD PIE!.. Shore is good tho!"

                    hehe.

                    Maeryk
                  • Arthur Slaughter
                    Right now i am working as a sort of general handyman for a french bakery. I am in the slow process of getting the woodshop going on a scale big enough to live
                    Message 9 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                      Right now i am working as a sort of general handyman for a french bakery. I am in the slow process of getting the woodshop going on a scale big enough to live on.  Taking a lot of time and I am having a ball!  After a lifetime of jobs that were just jobs I am doing what I love to do and people are giving money to do it! WHEEEEEEEEE!
                      Finn
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2004 11:26 AM
                      Subject: RE: [medievalsawdust] Thanks for the reminder

                      I toy with this concept myself from time to time, but I'm afraid that if
                      I try to make the creation of sawdust my day job, it'll become work, and
                      I won't enjoy it any more.

                      Who all here has gone pro?  How did it work out?

                      Will

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Don Bowen [mailto:donb@...]

                      It helps remind us that we do need to be careful.  I am attempting
                      to build a professional woodworking business and one of my best clients
                      is
                      a bookbinder. 

                    • Don Bowen
                      ... I had planned all along that it would be my extra retirement income but best laid plans and all that. 2 1/2 years ago I aged out of my career. I was a
                      Message 10 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                        At 2/26/2004, you wrote:
                        I toy with this concept myself from time to time, but I'm afraid that if I try to make the creation of sawdust my day job, it'll become work, and I won't enjoy it any more.

                        I had planned all along that it would be my extra retirement income but best laid plans and all that.  2 1/2 years ago I aged out of my career.  I was a software engineer that suddenly could no longer get interviews.  Places I had been contracted with started sending more work off shore and I was older with lots of experience.  That experience tends to frighten some who then feel threatened.  So here I am doing something else.

                        Who all here has gone pro?  How did it work out?

                        It is a slow process and I am doing home and RV repair to generate cash flow.  I do miss the money but enjoy the freedom.  I can now plan a three week trip to a Pacific Island and another two week trip to the midwest.  No more silly office political battles, no more having to spend 1-3 hours in traffic every day, no more listening someone in the next cubicle drone on an on about the latest stupid foot ball game or sit com.  If I can keep it up I will never go back.

                        Don Bowen
                        Awl Knotted Up Woodworking
                        Valley Center, CA             http://www.braingarage.com
                      • Don Bowen
                        ... I feel that I have a more complete control over my life. The money was nice but I have found out that I am still eating, still live in a nice house with a
                        Message 11 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                          At 2/26/2004, you wrote:
                          Right now i am working as a sort of general handyman for a french bakery. I am in the slow process of getting the woodshop going on a scale big enough to live on.  Taking a lot of time and I am having a ball!  After a lifetime of jobs that were just jobs I am doing what I love to do and people are giving money to do it! WHEEEEEEEEE!

                          I feel that I have a more complete control over my life.  The money was nice but I have found out that I am still eating, still live in a nice house with a good shop, have much more time to read and able to read what I want, and doing what I want to do.  No dippy little boss who figures his worth by how many Porches he can buy and I set the schedules.

                          Don Bowen
                          Awl Knotted Up Woodworking
                          Valley Center, CA             http://www.braingarage.com
                        • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                          Non-injury story... A guy I work with watched a guy ride a flying sheet of plywood off a 2nd story roof on a windy day. Gently gliding to the ground.... Any
                          Message 12 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                            Non-injury story...


                            A guy I work with watched a guy ride a
                            flying sheet of plywood off a 2nd story
                            roof on a windy day. Gently gliding to the
                            ground....

                            Any landing you walk away from is a good one...



                            =====
                            Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                            Seneschal, Barony of Fenix

                            Aude Aliquid Dignum
                            ' Dare Something Worthy '

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                          • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                            ... I ve gone pro Custom built cabinets for new and existing homes... Making stuff for the SCA has been more work than fun, but I m making the SCA look nicer
                            Message 13 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                              --- Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
                              > I toy with this concept myself from time to time,
                              > but I'm afraid that if
                              > I try to make the creation of sawdust my day job,
                              > it'll become work, and
                              > I won't enjoy it any more.
                              >
                              > Who all here has gone pro? How did it work out?
                              >
                              > Will
                              >


                              I've gone pro
                              Custom built cabinets for new and existing homes...

                              Making stuff for the SCA has been more work
                              than fun, but I'm making the SCA look nicer
                              while I'm at it.

                              And the free scraps and off-fall wood it a nice
                              bonus....

                              =====
                              Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                              Seneschal, Barony of Fenix

                              Aude Aliquid Dignum
                              ' Dare Something Worthy '

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                            • mahee of acre
                              I have decided that when I grow up I want to make wooden toys. I am 40 now, who knows when I will actually grow up your servant, mahee ps. every now and
                              Message 14 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                                I have decided that when I grow up I want to make wooden toys. I am 40
                                now, who knows when I will actually grow up<g>

                                your servant,
                                mahee

                                ps. every now and then I walk around giving little children wooden
                                horses made like one of the early viking horses. Give them good period
                                toys to play with at events...

                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@p...> wrote:
                                > I toy with this concept myself from time to time, but I'm afraid that if
                                > I try to make the creation of sawdust my day job, it'll become work, and
                                > I won't enjoy it any more.
                                >
                                > Who all here has gone pro? How did it work out?
                                >
                                > Will
                                >
                                > -----Original Message-----
                                > From: Don Bowen [mailto:donb@c...]
                                >
                                > It helps remind us that we do need to be careful. I am attempting
                                > to build a professional woodworking business and one of my best clients
                                > is
                                > a bookbinder.
                              • Tim Bray
                                ... You could start with Ranulf s excellent treatise on period woodworking tools - it came out in the Compleat Anachronist a few months ago. Cheers, Colin
                                Message 15 of 24 , Feb 26, 2004
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                                  >My immediate interest is in using period tools

                                  You could start with Ranulf's excellent treatise on period woodworking
                                  tools - it came out in the Compleat Anachronist a few months ago.

                                  Cheers,
                                  Colin



                                  Albion Works
                                  Furniture and Accessories
                                  For the Medievalist!
                                  http://www.albionworks.net
                                  http://www.albionworks.com
                                • Joseph Hayes
                                  ... Hobby horses are period, but I couldn t guess what they re made from. Check out the bottom center of Children s Games by Pieter Breugel the Elder (1560)
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                    --- mahee of acre <mahee_of_acre@...> wrote:
                                    > ps. every now and then I walk around giving little children wooden
                                    > horses made like one of the early viking horses. Give them good
                                    > period toys to play with at events...

                                    Hobby horses are period, but I couldn't guess what they're made from.
                                    Check out the bottom center of "Children's Games" by Pieter Breugel the
                                    Elder (1560) at
                                    http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/bruegel/bruegel_childrens_games.jpg.html

                                    Ulrich


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                                  • James Winkler
                                    Mahee wrote about makin toys. One of my favorite things to do... is to set up a scrap box for all those little bits of dowel and board that drop off and you
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                      Mahee wrote about makin' toys.  One of my favorite things to do... is to set up a scrap box for all those little bits of dowel and board that drop off and you look at and go, "Darn... hate to throw this way... " ... so you set aside in the scrap box for...  (???  Its early... the coffee hasn't kicked in yet...)
                                       
                                      Then...  when I get bored... or just want to goof around in the shop... I sort through the box and make toys out of the scrap.  I don't worry too much about 'period' or not... just make toys...    OH...  if you have some 'shorty' pieces of 2-by lumber...  a little trimming and playing with em' and they make great 'castle blocks' to donate to your Minister of Children and let the kids play with.   With a little creative insanity you can create all kinds of 'building blocks' in various shapes and sizes (arches, towers, wall sections, etc...).   A great way to use up scrap and make the kids in your group happy too... (... big kids... or little kids...)
                                       
                                      Three Fingers Charlie
                                    • Danial Roy
                                      When my son was little my scrap bucket was one of his favorite toys He would build all kinds of stuff from the blocks. Some of the Blocks after 7 years just
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                        When my son was little my scrap bucket was one of his favorite toys He would
                                        build all kinds of stuff from the blocks. Some of the Blocks after 7 years
                                        just made it back to the bucket.



                                        >From: "James Winkler" <jrwinkler@...>
                                        >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                        >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                        >Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Period toys (was:Thanks for the reminder)
                                        >Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2004 07:41:31 -0600
                                        >
                                        >Mahee wrote about makin' toys. One of my favorite things to do... is to
                                        >set up a scrap box for all those little bits of dowel and board that drop
                                        >off and you look at and go, "Darn... hate to throw this way... " .. so you
                                        >set aside in the scrap box for... (??? Its early... the coffee hasn't
                                        >kicked in yet...)
                                        >
                                        >Then... when I get bored... or just want to goof around in the shop... I
                                        >sort through the box and make toys out of the scrap. I don't worry too
                                        >much about 'period' or not... just make toys... OH... if you have some
                                        >'shorty' pieces of 2-by lumber... a little trimming and playing with em'
                                        >and they make great 'castle blocks' to donate to your Minister of Children
                                        >and let the kids play with. With a little creative insanity you can
                                        >create all kinds of 'building blocks' in various shapes and sizes (arches,
                                        >towers, wall sections, etc...). A great way to use up scrap and make the
                                        >kids in your group happy too... (... big kids... or little kids...)
                                        >
                                        >Three Fingers Charlie

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                                      • Dragano Abbruciati
                                        Thank you, Colin. I will look into procuring a copy. Dragano ... You could start with Ranulf s excellent treatise on period woodworking tools - it came out in
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                          Thank you, Colin.
                                           
                                          I will look into procuring a copy.
                                           
                                          Dragano 

                                          Tim Bray <tbray@...> wrote:

                                          >My immediate interest is in using period tools

                                          You could start with Ranulf's excellent treatise on period woodworking
                                          tools - it came out in the Compleat Anachronist a few months ago.

                                          Cheers,
                                          Colin



                                          Albion Works
                                          Furniture and Accessories
                                          For the Medievalist!
                                          http://www.albionworks.net
                                          http://www.albionworks.com



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                                        • Lithium
                                          Mahee wrote about makin toys. One of my favorite things to do... is to set up a scrap box for all those little bits of dowel and board that drop off and you
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                            Mahee wrote about makin' toys.  One of my favorite things to do... is to set up a scrap box for all those little bits of dowel and board that drop off and you look at and go, "Darn... hate to throw this way... " ... so you set aside in the scrap box for...  (???  Its early... the coffee hasn't kicked in yet...)
                                             
                                             
                                            Hello All,
                                             
                                            I remember my dads scrap metal & wood drum. As kids he use to hand us (my brother and I) a saw, hammer, and nails, point to the drum and give us 20 minute to make something.
                                             
                                            It was the best memory I have as a little kid.
                                             
                                            The scrap metal & wood drum is now mine, and I still do the timed building challange.  Last sunday I built a collaspable lathe / trestle table in a couple hours. 
                                             
                                            God, I'm in a melancholy mood
                                             
                                            Mary "corinne" Ostler 
                                             
                                             
                                          • mahee of acre
                                            The earliest hobby hourses that I have found are a carved horse on a stick..a big stick. but they are a fully carved wooden horse in a full gallop. Later ones
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                              The earliest hobby hourses that I have found are a carved horse on a
                                              stick..a big stick. but they are a fully carved wooden horse in a
                                              full gallop. Later ones become flat and just the head.

                                              ys,
                                              mahee

                                              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Hayes
                                              <von_landstuhl@y...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > --- mahee of acre <mahee_of_acre@y...> wrote:
                                              > > ps. every now and then I walk around giving little children wooden
                                              > > horses made like one of the early viking horses. Give them good
                                              > > period toys to play with at events...
                                              >
                                              > Hobby horses are period, but I couldn't guess what they're made
                                              from.
                                              > Check out the bottom center of "Children's Games" by Pieter Breugel
                                              the
                                              > Elder (1560) at
                                              >
                                              http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/bruegel/bruegel_childrens_games.jpg
                                              .html
                                              >
                                              > Ulrich
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > __________________________________
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                                              > Get better spam protection with Yahoo! Mail.
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                                            • mahee of acre
                                              http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/bruegel/bruegel_childrens_games.jpg You will also see tops, with pullstrings attached to sticks on the porch. dolls with
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Feb 27, 2004
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                                                http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/bruegel/bruegel_childrens_games.jpg

                                                You will also see tops, with pullstrings attached to sticks on the
                                                porch.

                                                dolls with their own stage in the lower left building.

                                                Stilts, both short and tall

                                                a stick with a bag on it

                                                barrel hoops

                                                child safety lances...long stick with 2 pronged pinwheel on it.

                                                3 level spinner being played with by the man on the table in the
                                                lower left corner.

                                                all sorts of stuff

                                                ys,
                                                mahee
                                              • windsingersmoon
                                                The stick thing in the upper left hand corner in the little girl s hands is a windmill and she s tilting with it.(the 2-pronged spin thing) The children
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Feb 28, 2004
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                                                  The stick thing in the upper left hand corner in the little girl's
                                                  hands is a 'windmill' and she's 'tilting' with it.(the 2-pronged
                                                  spin thing)

                                                  The children would sometimes do this while 'riding' hobby horses,
                                                  and 'gallop' towards each other, the 'windmill' spinning, and aiming
                                                  them at each other's windmills....No damage done. the windmills
                                                  just kind collide and spin off of each other.......

                                                  How do I 'know' all this ?
                                                  I've long worked on a file on Period toys, and have quite a few pix.
                                                  I've also reproduced quite a few, including these windmill-tilters.

                                                  I made them out of 3 foot or so oak water-sprouts (so they were thin
                                                  and straight) (oak, because it's still strong when it's thin and
                                                  straight) The mill end is also oak, has a hole in the center, larger
                                                  than the pin that goes through it, and at either end of that is a
                                                  square of rawhide, slipped into a slit in the wood.

                                                  I didn't make the hobby horses, but I did make a pair of the
                                                  windmills, and my lord and I walked quickly toward each other to
                                                  test them/reproduce the actions seen in pictures in my file, the end
                                                  results being as I've described above.

                                                  Reconstructive archeology can be Such Fun!!!!!
                                                  I Highly recommend it!

                                                  There's also a period 'helicopter' in at least on of my illumination
                                                  pix. It consists of a crossed pair of flat 'blades' afixed to the
                                                  top of a 'long thin oak' water sprout (same reason as earlier) but
                                                  the blades don't spin on the end; they are firmly affixed there.
                                                  The oak dowel-thing, goes down into a wooden ball which has two
                                                  holes in it.
                                                  One hole goes completely through the ball and is bigger than the oak
                                                  dowel. The other hole (smaller) comes in from the side, but only
                                                  into the middle of the first hole. The helicopter has a small hole
                                                  drilled through it, inches from the base. The base slides down
                                                  into the ball and a string goes through the side hole and into the
                                                  hole in the oak. This can then be done one of two ways to play
                                                  with it. The string can be left loose and just wound around the
                                                  dowel, untill it almost fills the space (but not quite)inside the
                                                  larger hole and pulled quickly. This results in the helicopter
                                                  spinning quickly until the string is finally pulled out of it, at
                                                  which point it become airborn. While this has cool flying
                                                  results that may need to be chased down, the down side is that it's
                                                  a pain to re-thread the sting back into the dowel in the hole.
                                                  (and a child would not be able to do it, and be for-ever hounding an
                                                  adult or older sibling to 'fix' it. At which point we get to
                                                  plan 'B'

                                                  is the adult/older sibling tosses away the ball, hands the kid the
                                                  oak stick, and shows them how to spin it off between their palms

                                                  Or Plan 'C'
                                                  is to knot the thread on the other side of the hole in the dowel.
                                                  Wind up the cord, and show the kid how to pull the cord 'X' amount
                                                  and then release the tension and let the spinning go back the other
                                                  way. This takes a bit of practice, but it's fun once you get the
                                                  hang of it.....the helicopter spins, first one way and then the
                                                  other, but never leaves the ball.

                                                  The thin wood blades can be split out of oak (a light tap on a knife
                                                  down a 6-8 inch x 1 inch green oak limb section will result thin but
                                                  strong 'blades'....a little trimming of the ends, a hole bored
                                                  through the middles of both, cross and afix to the squared-off end of
                                                  dowel/oak sprout, and most of the battle is won. The ball can be
                                                  made on a lathe.

                                                  Another toy from a lathe is a cup-in-ball.....also seen in some of
                                                  the Brugel paintings.

                                                  I've also made a soft leather ball (all handstitched)(as in other
                                                  illustrations and one actual finding) and filled it with the long
                                                  gleanings from my hairbrush. Human hair is long and not as likely
                                                  as animal fur to eventually escape from the stitchings. Human
                                                  hair was also a good thing to stuff pin cushions with; the oilier
                                                  the better, as it kept the precious pins from rusting.
                                                  Shara

                                                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "mahee of acre"
                                                  <mahee_of_acre@y...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  http://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/bruegel/bruegel_childrens_games.jp
                                                  g
                                                  >
                                                • mahee of acre
                                                  ... Please share pictures and more. Thank you, mahee
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Mar 1, 2004
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                                                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "windsingersmoon"
                                                    <asa.wood@e...> wrote:

                                                    > How do I 'know' all this ?
                                                    > I've long worked on a file on Period toys, and have quite a few pix.
                                                    > I've also reproduced quite a few, including these windmill-tilters.

                                                    Please share pictures and more.

                                                    Thank you,
                                                    mahee
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