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Nails for the Restoration Trade - was boxes

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  • Julian Wilson
    I think what the US-centred Ironmongery Trade names as cut nails are what we name as Rosehead Cut Nails or Pyramid Head Nails from your description. 
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 2, 2013
      I think what the US-centred Ironmongery Trade names as "cut nails" are what we name as "Rosehead Cut Nails" or "Pyramid Head Nails" from your description.  Over here in the UK  - the "lost head" versions of these Restoration-Trade nails are called "flooring brads".
      The Glasgow Steel Nail Co. - [the Western World's oldest Manufacturer of steel nails, still advertising that they made these nails on 200yr.-old machinery, the last time I looked,]   - was apparently bought by US-owned "Acorn" last year and transferred to the USA this year. The only trouble I found in the past - dealing with them - was that they would only sell their product "direct" in commercial quantities of 50kgs per order.
      So, Brusi, - thanks for the referral to Lee Valley and to Tools For Working Wood, who you tell us all will sell in smaller quantities..
      Matthewe,
       Island of "old" Jersey, U.K.


      From: bsrlee <bsrlee2@...>


       
      The best approximation of 'period' nails readily available in quantity are called 'cut nails', and are currently made by the Tremont Nail company in the USofA.

      Lee Valley stock a fair range of them in a variety of styles and sizes, and seem to be the best value if buying in quantity.
      http://www.leevalley.com/US/hardware/page.aspx?p=40387&cat=3,41306,41324

      Tools for Working Wood also have an even larger range of Tremont nails packaged under their house brand (Brooklyn Tool & Craft) but they are slightly more expensive per pound as their packet quanties are smaller.
      http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/  then search for 'nails'.
      They also have nice 19th Century 'King's County' style hand finished hammers.

      I have purchased from both many times without any problems - well, other than the tool p*rn and a smoking credit card.


    • conradh@...
      I was taught years ago to slightly curl the sharp tip of a clinch nail, drive it through the pilot hole until the tip was just visible, then set a heavy
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 5, 2013
        I was taught years ago to slightly curl the sharp tip of a clinch nail,
        drive it through the pilot hole until the tip was just visible, then set a
        heavy backing iron on the _inside_ and continue driving from the outside.
        The nail curves over and re-inters the wood, as opposed to just being bent
        over flat against the inside surface.

        Have you seen any signs of this method in period? They have a distinctive
        appearance; almost like the rounded top of a staple. Or were they all
        simply bent flat, as you've described?

        Ulfhedinn



        > the most of the period strapwork fastenings I've seen have been 'rosehead
        > cut nails'. Only a very few have been "through-bolted" - usually the
        > hasps, staples, and lifting handles..
        > And I'd say 95% of those fastenings have been clenched-over back into the
        > wall-timber, inside the chests.
        >
        > I do recall having seen a few medieval chests where the makers had added
        > 'roves' to spread the loading - but the most of the fastenings have been
        > simply clenched-over - presumably using a heavy dolly outside, and a
        > ball-pein hammer inside. That's what I do and it seem to work well enough.
        >
        > However, just to make that operation easier, I do take the time to sharpen
        > the business-end of each nail to a really-sharp point, and bend the first
        > 6mm behind that point at right angles to the main shaft in the direction
        > of the clench, once I've hammered the nail through the pilot-hole in the
        > chest timber,  - before starting the clenching-over operation.
        > regards,
        >  Matthewe
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...>
        > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sunday, 1 September 2013, 7:34
        > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] boxes
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        > Here is another question on boxes with metal straps: How are they
        > finished on the inside? Are the rivets/nails just clenched over? Are
        > they fitted with washers and peened like a rivit? are there straps
        > inside too?
        >
        >
        >
      • D. Young
        Yes this technique is used from the middle ages to the 19th century. I have numerous original pieces and components of furniture....many curled over nails. ...
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 5, 2013
          Yes this technique is used from the middle ages to the 19th century.

          I have numerous original pieces and components of furniture....many curled over nails.

          :)

          hope that helps
          Drew



          Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

               Custom Commissions Welcome....!

          www.partsandtechnical.com
          (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
           



          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          From: conradh@...
          Date: Thu, 5 Sep 2013 00:54:53 -0700
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] interiors of boxes

           
          I was taught years ago to slightly curl the sharp tip of a clinch nail,
          drive it through the pilot hole until the tip was just visible, then set a
          heavy backing iron on the _inside_ and continue driving from the outside.
          The nail curves over and re-inters the wood, as opposed to just being bent
          over flat against the inside surface.

          Have you seen any signs of this method in period? They have a distinctive
          appearance; almost like the rounded top of a staple. Or were they all
          simply bent flat, as you've described?

          Ulfhedinn

          > the most of the period strapwork fastenings I've seen have been 'rosehead
          > cut nails'. Only a very few have been "through-bolted" - usually the
          > hasps, staples, and lifting handles..
          > And I'd say 95% of those fastenings have been clenched-over back into the
          > wall-timber, inside the chests.
          >
          > I do recall having seen a few medieval chests where the makers had added
          > 'roves' to spread the loading - but the most of the fastenings have been
          > simply clenched-over - presumably using a heavy dolly outside, and a
          > ball-pein hammer inside. That's what I do and it seem to work well enough.
          >
          > However, just to make that operation easier, I do take the time to sharpen
          > the business-end of each nail to a really-sharp point, and bend the first
          > 6mm behind that point at right angles to the main shaft in the direction
          > of the clench, once I've hammered the nail through the pilot-hole in the
          > chest timber,  - before starting the clenching-over operation.
          > regards,
          >  Matthewe
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...>
          > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sunday, 1 September 2013, 7:34
          > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] boxes
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          > Here is another question on boxes with metal straps: How are they
          > finished on the inside? Are the rivets/nails just clenched over? Are
          > they fitted with washers and peened like a rivit? are there straps
          > inside too?
          >
          >
          >


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