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Re: carving a trough?

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  • henrikofhavn
    Scott, here is an alternate idea, instead of using wood, Try looking in junk yards for useful shapes of steel. Steel will serve you longer than wood will for
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 2, 2013
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      Scott, here is an alternate idea, instead of using wood,
      Try looking in junk yards for useful shapes of steel. Steel will serve you longer than wood will for armor plate shaping, in general. Between a 2 to 6 foot length of a large diameter (2 inches to 4 inches) steel pipe and a chunk of heavy steel like a large back hoe bucket tooth or bulldozer bucket tooth, or a piece of railroad track, you could probably do most of your armor shaping. I made my first helmet using a 2 foot length of railroad track , a ball pien hammer, a non-electric hand drill and a borrowed saber saw. I wore it in the lists and won 6 crowns wearing it during the first ten years, and still wear the same helmet for dress, 47 years (to be clear, that's almost five decades) later.

      A piece of railroad track has trough like curved corners under the overhanging upper rail surface, on each side of the central vertical rib connecting the rail to the base flange that the spikes hold down to the wooden cross ties of the track. These curved corners are where a plate can be hammered into, in lieu of a steel swage block or a wooden trough. Just lay the track on it's side and go to town. Likewise where the central rib meets the base flange of the track, two other curved corners create a larger area where curving cam be done to a larger diameter, such as for grieves. then the distance between these two rounded corners at the top and bottom of the rail can acomodate an even larger diameter, such as would be useful in making quises or helmets. Look around your local scrap or rail yard and see if there are any scraps that need a new home.

      Henrik



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      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
      >
      > I want to make a 12" to 14" long trough that is 3/4" deep, and 4" wide. With a curved bottom. Out of wood. 
      >
      > Kind of like one of these....
      >
      > http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery-Tools/Swage-Block-6-Groove-prcode-999-777
      >
      >
      > Is there a quick and easy way to do this. I'll be using it to hammer pieces of metal into them.
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Scot Eddy
      >
    • karincorbin
      sounds like a job for a set of metal rollers rather than a trough.
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 17, 2013
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        sounds like a job for a set of metal rollers rather than a trough.

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
        >
        > I want to make a 12" to 14" long trough that is 3/4" deep, and 4" wide. With a curved bottom. Out of wood. 
        >
        > Kind of like one of these....
        >
        > http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery-Tools/Swage-Block-6-Groove-prcode-999-777
        >
        >
        > Is there a quick and easy way to do this. I'll be using it to hammer pieces of metal into them.
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > Scot Eddy
        >
      • leaking pen
        drill holes then knock out pieces with a chisel and mallet. It s the method used to make lutes and guiterens.
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 17, 2013
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          drill holes then knock out pieces with a chisel and mallet. It's the method used to make lutes and guiterens.


          On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 11:50 PM, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
           

          I want to make a 12" to 14" long trough that is 3/4" deep, and 4" wide. With a curved bottom. Out of wood. 

          Kind of like one of these....


          Is there a quick and easy way to do this. I'll be using it to hammer pieces of metal into them.

          Thanks!

          Scot Eddy


        • Jim Hart
          Make saw cuts along the groove and then chisel out the waste.... smooth it down with chisels, gouges, rasps, and finally scrapers or sandpaper.... Like this
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 20, 2013
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            Make saw cuts along the groove and then chisel out the waste.... smooth it down with chisels, gouges, rasps, and finally scrapers or sandpaper.... 

            Like this but smaller....



            On Wed, Jul 17, 2013 at 9:49 PM, karincorbin <karincorbin@...> wrote:
             

            sounds like a job for a set of metal rollers rather than a trough.

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
            >
            > I want to make a 12" to 14" long trough that is 3/4" deep, and 4" wide. With a curved bottom. Out of wood. 
            >
            > Kind of like one of these....
            >
            > http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery-Tools/Swage-Block-6-Groove-prcode-999-777
            >
            >
            > Is there a quick and easy way to do this. I'll be using it to hammer pieces of metal into them.
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
            > Scot Eddy
            >




            --
            Jim Hart
              Conal OhAirt

            Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
          • karincorbin
            They did have curved bottom planes which would have done a nice job of dressing out the bottom. And they did have curved blade planes. Of course you don t have
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 24, 2013
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              They did have curved bottom planes which would have done a nice job of dressing out the bottom. And they did have curved blade planes. Of course you don't have either one.....

              But if you are going to do it with modern tools of which you have only the basics then I would take a series of passes with a circular saw lowering the blade to the various depths needed from side to side. Then I would remove the excess waste with a chisel or curved gouge. Final cleanup with a curved sanding block to smooth it all out. You could cut the radius of the sanding block surface with a scroll saw, fret saw, jig saw, etc.

              You will want to create a pattern of the full radius from a piece of plywood so you can check your groove to see if it is consistent.

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
              >
              > I want to make a 12" to 14" long trough that is 3/4" deep, and 4" wide. With a curved bottom. Out of wood. 
              >
              > Kind of like one of these....
              >
              > http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery-Tools/Swage-Block-6-Groove-prcode-999-777
              >
              >
              > Is there a quick and easy way to do this. I'll be using it to hammer pieces of metal into them.
              >
              > Thanks!
              >
              > Scot Eddy
              >
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