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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

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  • Dave Ordway
    Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand. Never do that again. Chisel
    Message 1 of 9 , May 3, 2013
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      Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
       
      Lagerstein
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2013 1:00 AM
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

       

      01 May is Woodworking Safety Day (used to be a whole week). I know I've gotten into some interesting challenges when working on reproduction pieces, I'm betting a few of the rest of you have as well. Anyone up for sharing the most useful woodworking safety thoughts?

      For me, I'd have to say that trying to cut a tenon or kerf without having something other than my off hand and clenched knees to hold the stock is a bad idea that no one should ever attempt.


      Vels

    • Justin Crouch
      Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand. Never do that again. Chisel
      Message 2 of 9 , May 3, 2013
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        ""Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
         
        Lagerstein""

        Done something like that before, didn't go to the bone, but I've cut myself plenty while working both wood and horn...although I never learn. lol

        LeO


        On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 6:45 PM, Dave Ordway <dabugler@...> wrote:
         

        Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
         
        Lagerstein
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2013 1:00 AM
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

         

        01 May is Woodworking Safety Day (used to be a whole week). I know I've gotten into some interesting challenges when working on reproduction pieces, I'm betting a few of the rest of you have as well. Anyone up for sharing the most useful woodworking safety thoughts?

        For me, I'd have to say that trying to cut a tenon or kerf without having something other than my off hand and clenched knees to hold the stock is a bad idea that no one should ever attempt.


        Vels


      • Jerry Harder
        I modified my wood lathe to except a larger piece of wood/log than it was meant to. Turned it on and the whole thing started walking across the garage floor.
        Message 3 of 9 , May 6, 2013
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          I modified my wood lathe to except a larger piece of wood/log than it was meant to.  Turned it on and the whole thing started  walking across the garage floor.   Undetoured, I pulled the plug, put a larger pulley on the motor and a smaller one on the spindle to slow in down, and piled the lower shelf full of anvils and concrete blocks.  This worked-well sort of.  The cheep "made in China" lathe tool I was using cought, bent, and caused my pinky to get sucked into the lathe.  That caused the permanent loss of a mouse sized bite of my left little finger.  I made new lathe tools on my forge out of 3/4 inch rebar and finished the job.  There's a lesson (maybe several) in there somewhere. Just say'in.

          On 5/3/2013 10:12 PM, Justin Crouch wrote:  
          ""Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
           
          Lagerstein""

          Done something like that before, didn't go to the bone, but I've cut myself plenty while working both wood and horn...although I never learn. lol

          LeO


          On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 6:45 PM, Dave Ordway <dabugler@...> wrote:
           

          Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
           
          Lagerstein
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2013 1:00 AM
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

           

          01 May is Woodworking Safety Day (used to be a whole week). I know I've gotten into some interesting challenges when working on reproduction pieces, I'm betting a few of the rest of you have as well. Anyone up for sharing the most useful woodworking safety thoughts?

          For me, I'd have to say that trying to cut a tenon or kerf without having something other than my off hand and clenched knees to hold the stock is a bad idea that no one should ever attempt.


          Vels


        • Julian Wilson
          Jerry, etal, here s my little contribution to this safety thread. Every time I start a day s work in my Workshop, my adrenalin level rockets, and my focus of
          Message 4 of 9 , May 6, 2013
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            Jerry,
            etal,
            here's my little contribution to this safety thread.
            Every time I start a day's work in my Workshop, my adrenalin level rockets, and my focus of concentration sharpens to "tunnel-vision".
            I'm frightened-enough of my machines and my manual cutting tools to be super-careful when using any of them.
            I won't say that - in over a half-century as a woodworker, - I've never had an accident from my edged tools, - but when I have cut myself it has been a minor injury, [God be thanked] and mostly because I allowed myself to be distracted by someone or something else. All the usual visitors to my Workshop [including my Bosses] now know enough not to distract me when I'm machining! They just move into my field of vision and wait until I'm done with the Operation I'm engaged upon.
            regards,
            Matthewe Baker


            From: Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...>
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, 6 May 2013, 9:11
            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

             
            I modified my wood lathe to except a larger piece of wood/log than it was meant to.  Turned it on and the whole thing started  walking across the garage floor.   Undetoured, I pulled the plug, put a larger pulley on the motor and a smaller one on the spindle to slow in down, and piled the lower shelf full of anvils and concrete blocks.  This worked-well sort of.  The cheep "made in China" lathe tool I was using cought, bent, and caused my pinky to get sucked into the lathe.  That caused the permanent loss of a mouse sized bite of my left little finger.  I made new lathe tools on my forge out of 3/4 inch rebar and finished the job.  There's a lesson (maybe several) in there somewhere. Just say'in.

          • Ralph
            I suspect most of us learned a few lessons woodworking, since I started making sawdust very young (12 or 13), some lessons came early. Or why my left hand
            Message 5 of 9 , May 7, 2013
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              I suspect most of us learned a few "lessons" woodworking, since I started making sawdust very young (12 or 13), some lessons came early. Or why my left hand (the one "holding" the wood) has scars from saws, chisels etc, and I made fewer mistakes when I went to power tools in my late teens.

              My wife just started wood-working in the last couple years, so she is taking her "lessons" later in life.

              Ralg
              AnTir
            • K
              sorry I m late, sharp tools are safer than dull ones (9 stitches to prove it 32 years ago) Hide or elevate the sharp tools when the small ones show up (4 yr
              Message 6 of 9 , May 18, 2013
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                sorry I'm late,
                sharp tools are safer than dull ones (9 stitches to prove it 32 years ago)
                Hide or elevate the sharp tools when the small ones show up (4 yr old w/ an axe... would not be good)never ever cut directly at your hand/arm/leg with anything.
                It is almost impossible to disembowel yourself with a drawknife.. but quite easy to cut your leg, arm or hand with one handles poorly.
                have fun, keep cutting.
                K
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