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Re: Essential Tools

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  • sean14powell
    The replies here are very interesting because it s the opposite of where I would have taken the request. I do woodworking in my shop for enjoyment and to build
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 4, 2013
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      The replies here are very interesting because it's the opposite of where I would have taken the request. I do woodworking in my shop for enjoyment and to build something nice to keep for a long time. When I'm asked to do 'woodworking' at an event it's usually short-notice and to FIX something not create something. The fix is often temporary until the event is over and the project packed away to be repaired before next year (or forgotten about until the next event).

      I want to have:
      Power drill and selection of bits.
      A small selection of modern dry-wall screws and nails in various lengths.
      The socket set from my car.
      A basic hand-saw.
      Hack-saw.
      A modern claw-hammer.
      Small pry-bar.
      Screwdriver with interchangeable bits.
      Leatherman or Swiss-army knife.
      Slip-jaw pliers for emergency plumbing repairs.
      Duct-tape.
      End-nippers (for rivets).
      Mini anvil. (Optional as many sites you can find a large rock or section of curb)
      Bag of zip-ties.
      15' extension cord.

      I don't worry about any of this looking medieval. It's all about 'Get er done!" before the curtain goes up. If I want to play medieval woodworker then I'm bringing a whole different set of tools that I really haven't collected yet. Maybe one-day I will reach that level but not quite yet.

      Sean

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" wrote:
      >
      > I have a question for the collected wisdom of the group. If you were to develop an "event" tool box, what tools should go in it? Now, I know: you can't know what tools you will need until you know what the task is at hand. And that's the point. As a woodworker, your last name tends to become Canu. As in, "Master William, can u . . . . ?"
      >
      > Often the answer is "no," because I don't have my tools with me. I'm not going to pack up the shop for every weekend event, but I'm trying to figure out what a good, general purpose kit would be for SCA events so that I have what I need on hand to help out or fix when I'm on site.
      >
    • Chuck Phillips
      I think you re headed in the right direction with this list. However, given the context of the request (Can you help make/fix this...) I would lean towards
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 4, 2013
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        I think you’re headed in the right direction with this list.  However, given the context of the request (Can you help make/fix this…) I would lean towards tools that can be brought out in the middle of an even and not break the ambience.  To that end, here’s my list:

        -Drawknife

        -A couple of chisels that can get chipped without you weeping

        -Block plane

        -Screwdrivers, Phillips & flathead

        -Some sort of hand saw, panel or back

        -Turning/coping saw

        -Eggbeater drill & bits (OOP, I know, but less of a mood-breaker than a power drill)

        -Brace & bits if you might need larger holes

        -Sharpening stones

        -Measuring rule

        -Marking knife

        -Pencil

        -Hammer

        -A handful of clamps (F-clamps & handscrews)

        -Glue

        -Assortment of nails & screws

         

        One thing to keep in mind:  Don’t bring tools that can’t suffer an occasional small but of rust or rough usage.  We all aim to preserve our tools, but things happen at a tourney.

         

        Charles Joiner

        The Caidan Lurker 

         

        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sean14powell
        Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 7:11 AM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Essential Tools

         

         

        The replies here are very interesting because it's the opposite of where I would have taken the request. I do woodworking in my shop for enjoyment and to build something nice to keep for a long time. When I'm asked to do 'woodworking' at an event it's usually short-notice and to FIX something not create something. The fix is often temporary until the event is over and the project packed away to be repaired before next year (or forgotten about until the next event).

        I want to have:
        Power drill and selection of bits.
        A small selection of modern dry-wall screws and nails in various lengths.
        The socket set from my car.
        A basic hand-saw.
        Hack-saw.
        A modern claw-hammer.
        Small pry-bar.
        Screwdriver with interchangeable bits.
        Leatherman or Swiss-army knife.
        Slip-jaw pliers for emergency plumbing repairs.
        Duct-tape.
        End-nippers (for rivets).
        Mini anvil. (Optional as many sites you can find a large rock or section of curb)
        Bag of zip-ties.
        15' extension cord.

        I don't worry about any of this looking medieval. It's all about 'Get er done!" before the curtain goes up. If I want to play medieval woodworker then I'm bringing a whole different set of tools that I really haven't collected yet. Maybe one-day I will reach that level but not quite yet.

        Sean

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" wrote:
        >
        > I have a question for the collected wisdom of the group. If you were to develop an "event" tool box, what tools should go in it? Now, I know: you can't know what tools you will need until you know what the task is at hand. And that's the point. As a woodworker, your last name tends to become Canu. As in, "Master William, can u . . . . ?"
        >
        > Often the answer is "no," because I don't have my tools with me. I'm not going to pack up the shop for every weekend event, but I'm trying to figure out what a good, general purpose kit would be for SCA events so that I have what I need on hand to help out or fix when I'm on site.
        >

      • lorderec
        A GrEAT book! His blog also has some interesting things, he recently finished a Dutch tool chest for traveling and a portable bench top which you can see
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 4, 2013
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          A GrEAT book! His blog also has some interesting things, he recently finished a Dutch tool chest for traveling and a portable bench top which you can see here:http://blog.lostartpress.com/2013/01/31/two-quick-notes-on-atlanta-and-tools/

          -Erec


          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, James Daily wrote:
          >
          > One of the points Chris Schwarz makes in The Anarchist's Tool Chest is that the essential list of tools was, historically, actually pretty short and has not changed much since.
          >
          > "Joseph Moxon ... describes 44 kinds of tools necessary for joinery in "Mechanick Exercises" (1678). For some of these tools, you'd need several in different sizes (such as chisels), but for many of the tools that he described, a joiner would need only one (a workbench, axe, fore plane etc.).
          >
          > Randle Holme's "Academie of Armory" (Book III, 1688) has approximately 46 different joinery tools explained in his encyclopedia."
          >
          > I guess a question is, do you want a "tool box" or a "tool chest"? Because you can fit everything you need in a tool chest (according to Schwarz, anyway), but a tool box or tote would be more limited. A couple of other questions: would you be starting with logs, rough sawn lumber, or milled lumber? Do you care about finishing work (e.g. moulding, carving) or just joinery? If you can eliminate any categories of work then you can really pare down the list.
          >
          > -James
          >
          >
          > On Feb 3, 2013, at 11:35 AM, "Bill" wrote:
          >
          > > I have a question for the collected wisdom of the group. If you were to develop an "event" tool box, what tools should go in it? Now, I know: you can't know what tools you will need until you know what the task is at hand. And that's the point. As a woodworker, your last name tends to become Canu. As in, "Master William, can u . . . . ?"
          > >
          > > Often the answer is "no," because I don't have my tools with me. I'm not going to pack up the shop for every weekend event, but I'm trying to figure out what a good, general purpose kit would be for SCA events so that I have what I need on hand to help out or fix when I'm on site.
          > >
          > >
          >
        • karincorbin
          In my travel tool kit I wanted to have the ability to take a larger piece of lumber and break it down as well as making precision cuts on smaller pieces of
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 8, 2013
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            In my travel tool kit I wanted to have the ability to take a larger piece of lumber and break it down as well as making precision cuts on smaller pieces of lumber. So I chose a precision miter saw guide that fits into a very small box, it guides a Japanese pull saw. There is a video for it on youtube if you want to see it in action. But here is a link to a website about it. I got mine at Hardwicks Hardware store in Seattle. It works great, pair it with a good saw and you will be able to quickly make all kinds of things at events.
            http://www.fine-tools.com/G-sawguide.html

            The other thing I felt was needed for taking on large and small projects was a lightweight folding sawhorse that was easy to store in a small area. I purchased a Hide-a-horse and have been very pleased with it. http://hideahorsefoldingsawhorses.com/

            I can store it in a very small area when it is folded. I am making several removable top plates that secure into threaded inserts in the top of the sawhorse for it so I can mount various tools on it. It is very nice for taking outside and sitting in a lawn chair while I do carving. You can see that configuration in this photo from my blog.
            http://karincorbin.blogspot.com/2012/06/power-strop-to-go.html

            Note another essential tool kit item in that blog posting, a homemade honing wheel for sharpening tools. I can even use it to resharpen scalpel blades to a razor edge and as for sharpening carving tools, knives and chisels it works great, no need to take any other sharpening equipment along unless you need to regrind an axe. It is made from glued up layers of double thick mat board. It works just fine in my cordless drill motor so I consider it another essential in my road trip kit of tools.

            Karin



            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" wrote:
            >
            > I have a question for the collected wisdom of the group. If you were to develop an "event" tool box, what tools should go in it? Now, I know: you can't know what tools you will need until you know what the task is at hand. And that's the point. As a woodworker, your last name tends to become Canu. As in, "Master William, can u . . . . ?"
            >
            > Often the answer is "no," because I don't have my tools with me. I'm not going to pack up the shop for every weekend event, but I'm trying to figure out what a good, general purpose kit would be for SCA events so that I have what I need on hand to help out or fix when I'm on site.
            >
          • Jerry Harder
            ... I don t know where people get the idea that glue is not period. Both hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood. Theophlis-(1100 s)
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 11, 2013
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              On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:  


              Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.

              I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period.  Both hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.  Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as does Cinni (1400?'s)  Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved. (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair.  Is medieval glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it?  I have a 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes on it that have been well received.     BTW:   Hide glue is water and heat soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both.  Both were used in wood working and easy to make.  Neither will glue bone but a mixture made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.
            • Thylacine
              I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made any. would
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 11, 2013
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                I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                Thanks
                Alden

                On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...> wrote:
                 

                On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                 


                Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.

                I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period.  Both hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.  Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as does Cinni (1400?'s)  Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved. (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair.  Is medieval glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it?  I have a 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes on it that have been well received.     BTW:   Hide glue is water and heat soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both.  Both were used in wood working and easy to make.  Neither will glue bone but a mixture made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.


              • lists lists
                I am quite curious about cheese lime glue as well. Please do post a link if you can. Thank you.
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 11, 2013
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                  I am quite curious about cheese lime glue as well. Please do post a link if you can. Thank you.

                  On 11/02/2013 8:30 PM, "Thylacine" <thylacine@...> wrote:
                   

                  I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                  Thanks
                  Alden

                  On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...> wrote:
                   

                  On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                   


                  Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.

                  I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period.  Both hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.  Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as does Cinni (1400?'s)  Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved. (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair.  Is medieval glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it?  I have a 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes on it that have been well received.     BTW:   Hide glue is water and heat soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both.  Both were used in wood working and easy to make.  Neither will glue bone but a mixture made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.


                • Lynda Fjellman
                  There is a nice Compleat Anachronist that covers all the types of medieval glues. http://sca.org/ca/issues.html Ilaria ________________________________ From:
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 11, 2013
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                    There is a nice Compleat Anachronist that covers all the types of medieval glues.

                    http://sca.org/ca/issues.html
                    Ilaria


                    From: Thylacine <thylacine@...>
                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, February 11, 2013 1:30 AM
                    Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Essential Tools

                     
                    I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                    Thanks
                    Alden

                    On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...> wrote:
                     
                    On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                     


                    Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.

                    I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period.  Both hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.  Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as does Cinni (1400?'s)  Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved. (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair.  Is medieval glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it?  I have a 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes on it that have been well received.     BTW:   Hide glue is water and heat soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both.  Both were used in wood working and easy to make.  Neither will glue bone but a mixture made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.



                  • karincorbin
                    Cheese glue makes a good mouse trap bait. Karin
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 11, 2013
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                      Cheese glue makes a good mouse trap bait.

                      Karin

                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, lists lists wrote:
                      >
                      > I am quite curious about cheese lime glue as well. Please do post a link if
                      > you can. Thank you.
                      > On 11/02/2013 8:30 PM, "Thylacine" wrote:
                      >
                      > > **
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide
                      > > glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made
                      > > any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                      > > Thanks
                      > > Alden
                      > >
                      > > On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder wrote:
                      > >
                      > >> **
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >> On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >> Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit
                      > >> authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and
                      > >> sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of
                      > >> "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a
                      > >> pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an
                      > >> iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.
                      > >>
                      > >> I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period. Both
                      > >> hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.
                      > >> Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as
                      > >> does Cinni (1400?'s) Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved.
                      > >> (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks
                      > >> and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they
                      > >> look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that
                      > >> has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up
                      > >> that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair. Is medieval
                      > >> glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it? I have a
                      > >> 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes
                      > >> on it that have been well received. BTW: Hide glue is water and heat
                      > >> soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both. Both were used
                      > >> in wood working and easy to make. Neither will glue bone but a mixture
                      > >> made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell
                      > >> "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well
                      > >> but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Avery Austringer
                      ... Well, yeah, but mine is a plastic squeezy bottle of yellow aliphatic glue. It s more like what they would have used in period than JB Weld, but If I were
                      Message 10 of 18 , Feb 12, 2013
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                        >> A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit authentic)...
                        >
                        >I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period.

                        Well, yeah, but mine is a plastic squeezy bottle of yellow aliphatic glue. It's
                        more like what they would have used in period than JB Weld, but If I were trying
                        to really go full on authentic, it would be a dead giveaway.

                        Avery
                      • gavinkilkenny
                        I would read an article on historic glues ;) Gavin
                        Message 11 of 18 , Feb 12, 2013
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                          I would read an article on historic glues ;)

                          Gavin


                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "karincorbin" wrote:
                          >
                          > Cheese glue makes a good mouse trap bait.
                          >
                          > Karin
                          >
                          > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, lists lists wrote:
                          > >
                          > > I am quite curious about cheese lime glue as well. Please do post a link if
                          > > you can. Thank you.
                          > > On 11/02/2013 8:30 PM, "Thylacine" wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > **
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide
                          > > > glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made
                          > > > any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                          > > > Thanks
                          > > > Alden
                          > > >
                          > > > On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > >> **
                          > > >>
                          > > >>
                          > > >> On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                          > > >>
                          > > >>
                          > > >>
                          > > >>
                          > > >> Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit
                          > > >> authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and
                          > > >> sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of
                          > > >> "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a
                          > > >> pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an
                          > > >> iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.
                          > > >>
                          > > >> I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period. Both
                          > > >> hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.
                          > > >> Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as
                          > > >> does Cinni (1400?'s) Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved.
                          > > >> (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks
                          > > >> and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they
                          > > >> look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that
                          > > >> has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up
                          > > >> that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair. Is medieval
                          > > >> glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it? I have a
                          > > >> 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes
                          > > >> on it that have been well received. BTW: Hide glue is water and heat
                          > > >> soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both. Both were used
                          > > >> in wood working and easy to make. Neither will glue bone but a mixture
                          > > >> made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell
                          > > >> "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well
                          > > >> but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.
                          > > >>
                          > > >>
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Copernicus Skygazer
                          My apprentice has made cheese glue. You only have a couple of hours to use it once made at most, and the stuff is amazingly strong when made right. YIS
                          Message 12 of 18 , Feb 12, 2013
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                            My apprentice has made cheese glue. You only have a couple of hours to use
                            it once made at most, and the stuff is amazingly strong when made right.
                            YIS
                            Phillipos the Skeptic


                            On Mon, 11 Feb 2013, Thylacine wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            > I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide glue , I have never heard of the cheese
                            > lime glue and I have never made any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                            > Thanks
                            > Alden
                            >
                            > On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder <geraldgoodwine@...> wrote:
                            >  
                            >
                            > On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                            >  
                            >
                            > Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit authentic), a water stone, a
                            > little galvanized pan to soak it in and sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers,
                            > a pair of "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a pair of end
                            > nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.
                            >
                            > I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period.  Both hide and cheese-lime glue are
                            > completely period and used for wood.  Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue
                            > as does Cinni (1400?'s)  Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved. (Leaf glue is not made from
                            > leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes
                            > and they look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that has everything for both I
                            > take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair. 
                            > Is medieval glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it?  I have a 20-30 pg article written
                            > on medieval glue and have taught several classes on it that have been well received.     BTW:   Hide glue is
                            > water and heat soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both.  Both were used in wood working
                            > and easy to make.  Neither will glue bone but a mixture made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?))
                            > (I probably didn't spell "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well but can
                            > still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                          • Sir David Vavreck
                            Me, too. I am currently in need of information on period heat-resistant glue for a project I am working on.
                            Message 13 of 18 , Feb 12, 2013
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                              Me, too.

                              I am currently in need of information on period heat-resistant glue for a project I am working on.


                              > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, lists lists wrote:
                              > >
                              > > I am quite curious about cheese lime glue as well. Please do post a link if
                              > > you can. Thank you.
                              > > On 11/02/2013 8:30 PM, "Thylacine" wrote:
                              > >
                              > > > **
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide
                              > > > glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made
                              > > > any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                              > > > Thanks
                              > > > Alden
                              > > >
                              > > > On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > >> **
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >> On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >> Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit
                              > > >> authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and
                              > > >> sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of
                              > > >> "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a
                              > > >> pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an
                              > > >> iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.
                              > > >>
                              > > >> I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period. Both
                              > > >> hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.
                              > > >> Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as
                              > > >> does Cinni (1400?'s) Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved.
                              > > >> (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks
                              > > >> and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they
                              > > >> look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that
                              > > >> has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up
                              > > >> that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair. Is medieval
                              > > >> glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it? I have a
                              > > >> 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes
                              > > >> on it that have been well received. BTW: Hide glue is water and heat
                              > > >> soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both. Both were used
                              > > >> in wood working and easy to make. Neither will glue bone but a mixture
                              > > >> made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell
                              > > >> "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well
                              > > >> but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.
                            • karincorbin
                              None of the protein (animal) glues...hide, fish, gelatin, cheese, casien are heat resistant. Heat is one of the ways to get them to give up their grip so
                              Message 14 of 18 , Feb 13, 2013
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                                None of the protein (animal) glues...hide, fish, gelatin, cheese, casien are heat resistant. Heat is one of the ways to get them to give up their grip so repairs can be made to furniture.

                                You will need to use mechanical type of fasteners in addition to glue or to use wedge locking joint designs if heat is going to be an issue.

                                Karin



                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Sir David Vavreck wrote:
                                >
                                > Me, too.
                                >
                                > I am currently in need of information on period heat-resistant glue for a project I am working on.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, lists lists wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > I am quite curious about cheese lime glue as well. Please do post a link if
                                > > > you can. Thank you.
                                > > > On 11/02/2013 8:30 PM, "Thylacine" wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > > **
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > I would be interested in a copy of your article. While I have used hide
                                > > > > glue , I have never heard of the cheese lime glue and I have never made
                                > > > > any. would definitely be interested in the info.
                                > > > > Thanks
                                > > > > Alden
                                > > > >
                                > > > > On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:26 AM, Jerry Harder wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > >> **
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >> On 2/4/2013 12:00 AM, Avery Austringer wrote:
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >> Other stuff - Nails. A bottle of yellow glue (yeah, not the least bit
                                > > > >> authentic), a water stone, a little galvanized pan to soak it in and
                                > > > >> sharpening jig, a scratch stock I made, a rasp, some scrapers, a pair of
                                > > > >> "contour planes" from Lee Valley a saw file or two, a small regular file, a
                                > > > >> pair of end nippers and a small pair of pliers, a couple bench hooks, an
                                > > > >> iron hold down and a dowel plate I made.
                                > > > >>
                                > > > >> I don't know where people get the idea that glue is not period. Both
                                > > > >> hide and cheese-lime glue are completely period and used for wood.
                                > > > >> Theophlis-(1100's) On Diverse Arts tells how to make cheese lime glue as
                                > > > >> does Cinni (1400?'s) Hide and leaf glue can be stored dry redissolved.
                                > > > >> (Leaf glue is not made from leaves but hide glue set up like knox blocks
                                > > > >> and cut in slices like bread, and dried ) I cut mine into cubes and they
                                > > > >> look like little jeweled caltrops) I have a kit in an old breef-case that
                                > > > >> has everything for both I take to wars since I wouldn't want to mess up
                                > > > >> that perfect medieval project with a modern emergency repair. Is medieval
                                > > > >> glue enough of an enigma that I should post an article on it? I have a
                                > > > >> 20-30 pg article written on medieval glue and have taught several classes
                                > > > >> on it that have been well received. BTW: Hide glue is water and heat
                                > > > >> soluble, cheese-lime glue is (once dry) resistant to both. Both were used
                                > > > >> in wood working and easy to make. Neither will glue bone but a mixture
                                > > > >> made as a hot glue will ("Mapa cavilcula"(800's?)) (I probably didn't spell
                                > > > >> "Mapa cavilcula" right) and fish hide glue will glue bone very very well
                                > > > >> but can still re-dissolve like any other hide glue.
                                >
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