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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Camp Clothes Rack

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  • Julian Wilson
    Yes, I couldn r agree more.The wedge-locked tenon in a through-mortice is the classic period joint for furniture of the medieval Era, furniture which needs to
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 27, 2013
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      Yes, I couldn'r agree more.The wedge-locked tenon in a through-mortice is the classic period joint for furniture of the medieval Era, furniture which needs to be able to be flat-packed and transported on packhorses, or in Wains.
      Matthew Baker,
      who has now made a lot of flat-packing medieval-replica camp furniture for the SCA Populace in Europe, after fitting-out his own Camp..



      From: Dan Baker <LordRhys@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, 26 January 2013, 18:23
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Camp Clothes Rack

       
      I would mortise and tennon the legs into the feel, move the lower cross support down, and change the dowels to 1x2s do a through tennon on the sides and pin them with wedges,  This would allow for easy packing, pull 4 wedges and it comes apart for packing. 

      -Capten Rhys

      On Sat, Jan 26, 2013 at 12:06 PM, James Daily <dailyje@...> wrote:
       
      Hi,

      I've been thinking about making a portable clothes rack for storing clothes while camping.  I came across this design on lumberjocks


      any thoughts, particularly on how the uprights are joined to the feet?  I assume mortise and tenon.  Also, I don't anticipate the lower dowel being used for anything except structural support.  Could it be moved lower, almost to the feet?  I worry if I did that it might have a tendency to rack.

      Thanks,
      James



    • Avery Austringer
      ... To me this looks like a good place for a lap joint (like the one on the lower left, here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Woodworking-joint-lap.gif). If
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 27, 2013
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        > any thoughts, particularly on how the uprights are joined to the feet? I assume mortise and tenon.

        To me this looks like a good place for a lap joint (like the one on the lower left, here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Woodworking-joint-lap.gif).  If you cut it tight enough and use tusk tenons and wedges for your lower stretchers, you wouldn't even have to glue the feet to the posts - just let the tenon on the stretcher and the wedges lock them together.

        I don't think it really matters where you put the lower stretcher - any arrangement for 4 arms and 4 connection points can rack if you stress it enough.  If your camping spots tend to be nice and level and you're not too much of a clothes horse the shoulders on a lower stretcher would probably be sufficient to keep it from doing so - if you're really going to load this thing down and you keep ending up on slopes you're going to need some kind of angled brace.

        Avery
      • Laurie
        While the clothes rack I have isn t as fancy as some, it came with my tourney chest. The top cross beam is tusk tenon like the others and the bottom goes
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 27, 2013
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          While the clothes rack I have isn’t as fancy as some, it came with my tourney chest.  The top cross beam is tusk tenon like the others and the bottom goes through the handles on the sides of my chest.  It will hold shirts and pants just fine, but because of the chest there isn’t enough space for dresses.  No pictures at the moment because it is deep in winter storage.

        • lorderec
          Oh I have to show you what I made to solve this problem. I fold my clothes like medieval people. But my wife well u know. So I build a cabon, a kufenschrank
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 4, 2013
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            Oh I have to show you what I made to solve this problem. I fold my clothes like medieval people. But my wife well u know. So I build a cabon, a kufenschrank to be exact, after some 14th century ones that st Thomas guild blogged about. It is completely enclosed, but folds up 6 inches flat for transport. Thin panels in the sides and back to keeps the weight down, door with spot for mirror and all
            -erec

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Laurie" wrote:
            >
            > While the clothes rack I have isn't as fancy as some, it came with my
            > tourney chest. The top cross beam is tusk tenon like the others and the
            > bottom goes through the handles on the sides of my chest. It will hold
            > shirts and pants just fine, but because of the chest there isn't enough
            > space for dresses. No pictures at the moment because it is deep in winter
            > storage.
            >
          • lorderec
            Some pix of the cabon are here on my blog: http://medievalgardening.blogspot.com let me know what you think. oh, and here is the St Thomas Guild, if you don t
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 6, 2013
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              Some pix of the cabon are here on my blog:
              http://medievalgardening.blogspot.com

              let me know what you think.
              oh, and here is the St Thomas Guild, if you don't know them yet:
              http://thomasguild.blogspot.com/

              thanks,
              -Erec

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "lorderec" wrote:
              >
              > Oh I have to show you what I made to solve this problem. I fold my clothes like medieval people. But my wife well u know. So I build a cabon, a kufenschrank to be exact, after some 14th century ones that st Thomas guild blogged about. It is completely enclosed, but folds up 6 inches flat for transport. Thin panels in the sides and back to keeps the weight down, door with spot for mirror and all
              > -erec
              >
              > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Laurie" wrote:
              > >
              > > While the clothes rack I have isn't as fancy as some, it came with my
              > > tourney chest. The top cross beam is tusk tenon like the others and the
              > > bottom goes through the handles on the sides of my chest. It will hold
              > > shirts and pants just fine, but because of the chest there isn't enough
              > > space for dresses. No pictures at the moment because it is deep in winter
              > > storage.
              > >
              >
            • conradh@...
              ... I ve been going more and more to three-legged camp gear, just because even level ground is often lumpy enough to produce this racking problem you mention.
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 6, 2013
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                > I don't think it really matters where you put the lower stretcher - any
                > arrangement for 4 arms and 4 connection points can rack if you stress it
                > enough.
                > If your camping spots tend to be nice and level and you're not too much
                > of a
                > clothes horse the shoulders on a lower stretcher would probably be
                > sufficient to
                > keep it from doing so - if you're really going to load this thing down and
                > you
                > keep ending up on slopes you're going to need some kind of angled brace.
                >
                > Avery

                I've been going more and more to three-legged camp gear, just because even
                level ground is often lumpy enough to produce this racking problem you
                mention. Besides racking strain on your joinery, four-legged items can be
                just plain unstable, on ground where a three-legged item would be secure.
                This can be an issue with something as tall as a clothes rack, especially
                given how easy it is to snag the rack when removing something in a hurry.

                I have no idea whether you could document a period example, but how about
                using the tusk-tenon joinery to make a clothes rack with a triangular
                footprint? It could have lots more room on it, given that it would all
                knock down and store flat, and be more stable; also the more open interior
                would help in drying damp garb and gear.

                It could be joined out of narrow boards, or turned--like an oversize
                version of a three-legged stool, without a seat.

                Ulfhedinn
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