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Re: [MedievalSawdust] 2 methods of build a coffer

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  • Scot Eddy
    Yeah, I kinda did answer my own question. I did an earlier curved lid coffer the first way (separate pieces) I guess I ll try it as one whole piece. As a side
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 31, 2012
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      Yeah, I kinda did answer my own question. I did an earlier curved lid coffer the first way (separate pieces) I guess I'll try it as one whole piece.

      As a side note, parchment paper (in the cooking section by the waxed paper) works better for glue management. I've reused parchment paper 5-6 times now and it still peels right off.

      Grace and Peace,

      Jovian



      From: Jim Hart <conalohairt@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, December 31, 2012 11:57 AM
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] 2 methods of build a coffer

       
      That really depends on how accurately you feel you can match the parts if made separately.

      You have answered your own question you just have to decide which YOU can do better.

      Your own skills are the decision making aspect.

      Consider masking tape ( the blue kind ) as a way to hold parts together or bungee cords ( put wax paper under them 
      where they might contact glue. ) as a flexible 'clamp'

      On Sun, Dec 30, 2012 at 11:46 PM, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
       
      I want to make a curved lid coffer for a friend. Would it be better to build the box and lid separately or should I build it in one piece and cut the lid off as I would a cubical box?

      If I do them separately I can clamp and glue the curved wood more efficiently, but with the one piece construction the lid and box are the same size and fit better.

      Thoughts?

      Grace and Peace,

      Jovian



      --
      Jim Hart
        Conal OhAirt

      Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy


    • Avery Austringer
      ... Here s how I d approach the problem: Step 1 - Make the lid and body separately. Use pegs and glue for assembly, not metal fasteners. Step 2 - Mount the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2013
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        > I want to make a curved lid coffer for a friend. Would it be better to
        > build the box and lid separately or should I build it in one piece and cut
        > the lid off as I
        would a cubical box?
        >
        > If I do them separately I can clamp and glue the curved wood more
        > efficiently, but with the one piece construction the lid and box are the
        > same size and fit better.

        Here's how I'd approach the problem:

        Step 1 - Make the lid and body separately.  Use pegs and glue for assembly, not metal fasteners.  
        Step 2 - Mount the hinges, line up the back as close to perfect as possible.
        Step 3 - Use a smoothing plane to take any slop out of the front and sides so that everything lines up perfectly.  Feel smug.

        I started doing this with the tongue and groove joinery on the fronts and backs of hutch style chests since there was always just enough slop in the joint to annoy me no matter which technique or how careful I was and then ran with it.  Now days people are impressed by the perfectly flush cut corners of things like Mastermyr boxes and somehow, despite all reason, assume that I'm cutting those boards to withing a 64th of an inch over a length of feet. (In fact, I cut 'em with an extra 1/16th or even 1/8th inch and plane them flush.)

        If you decide to go this route, really think about the grain direction of things and where your excess is going to be to avoid tear out. Also, a smoothing plane with a decent camber (maybe a 1/64th or even 1/32nd of an inch) will make this process a little easier.

        Avery
      • karincorbin
        You can also do a modified approach. Build the basic framing as one unit. Then make the cuts to separate it but don t completely cut through all the sides.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 7, 2013
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          You can also do a modified approach. Build the basic framing as one unit. Then make the cuts to separate it but don't completely cut through all the sides. Leave a several inches long tab of wood in the center of the sides to hold the domed top in place.

          Put your curved pieces on the top. Then finish the separation of the top and bottom by sawing through the tabs.

          Karin

          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy wrote:
          >
          > I want to make a curved lid coffer for a friend. Would it be better to build the box and lid separately or should I build it in one piece and cut the lid off as I would a cubical box?
          >
          > If I do them separately I can clamp and glue the curved wood more efficiently, but with the one piece construction the lid and box are the same size and fit better.
          >
          > Thoughts?
          >
          > Grace and Peace,
          >
          > Jovian
          >
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