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Ebay drawknife

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  • gavinkilkenny
    I got lucky and won a wetherby draw knife auction at a very modest price. Then it arrived and I got a good look at it... Why would someone grind a tool when
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 7, 2012
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      I got lucky and won a wetherby draw knife auction at a very modest price.

      Then it arrived and I got a good look at it... Why would someone grind a tool when they don't know how? The bad job of grinding this blade, done quite recently judging by how bright and shiny the scratches are still, is making it much more difficult to get this sharpened- at least I'm betting it wouldn't have been worse had they not put it to the grinder...

      It's a slender,almost delicate tool. I expect intended for carving work, more than hogging off a bunch of wood. I've got some projects in mind for it if I can get it tuned up.

      Oh yeah, whoever ground it also through a back bevel on there. Unevenly and probably more than it ought to be...

      But, it's a new toy and I will have fun with it.
    • Diane
      I just hate it when people ruin a perfectly good tool through ignorance or impatience. A shame. Good luck. Are you a goo sharpener yourself or do you know
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 11, 2012
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        I just hate it when people ruin a perfectly good tool through ignorance or impatience. A shame. Good luck. Are you a goo sharpener yourself or do you know some one who is a blade maker or cutlerer? They might have some valid suggestions on rehabilitation of the blade.

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "gavinkilkenny" <dukegavin@...> wrote:
        >
        > I got lucky and won a wetherby draw knife auction at a very modest price.
        >
        > Then it arrived and I got a good look at it... Why would someone grind a tool when they don't know how? The bad job of grinding this blade, done quite recently judging by how bright and shiny the scratches are still, is making it much more difficult to get this sharpened- at least I'm betting it wouldn't have been worse had they not put it to the grinder...
        >
        > It's a slender,almost delicate tool. I expect intended for carving work, more than hogging off a bunch of wood. I've got some projects in mind for it if I can get it tuned up.
        >
        > Oh yeah, whoever ground it also through a back bevel on there. Unevenly and probably more than it ought to be...
        >
        > But, it's a new toy and I will have fun with it.
        >
      • Jim Hart
        I saw one at an antique show that someone had used like a splitting froe... MULTIPLE times by the look of the thing. They used a steel hammer to beat on the
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 11, 2012
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          I saw one at an antique show that someone had used like a splitting froe... 

          MULTIPLE times by the look of the thing.

          They used a steel hammer to beat on the back of the blade.

          The guy wanted $40 for it... I offered 25$ only because it had folding handles...

          He looked insulted ( I hate tool collectors, they have convinced everyone that old tools are
          made from solid gold ) 




          On Sun, Nov 11, 2012 at 2:56 PM, Diane <dianerzebet@...> wrote:
           

          I just hate it when people ruin a perfectly good tool through ignorance or impatience. A shame. Good luck. Are you a goo sharpener yourself or do you know some one who is a blade maker or cutlerer? They might have some valid suggestions on rehabilitation of the blade.

          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "gavinkilkenny" <dukegavin@...> wrote:
          >
          > I got lucky and won a wetherby draw knife auction at a very modest price.
          >
          > Then it arrived and I got a good look at it... Why would someone grind a tool when they don't know how? The bad job of grinding this blade, done quite recently judging by how bright and shiny the scratches are still, is making it much more difficult to get this sharpened- at least I'm betting it wouldn't have been worse had they not put it to the grinder...
          >
          > It's a slender,almost delicate tool. I expect intended for carving work, more than hogging off a bunch of wood. I've got some projects in mind for it if I can get it tuned up.
          >
          > Oh yeah, whoever ground it also through a back bevel on there. Unevenly and probably more than it ought to be...
          >
          > But, it's a new toy and I will have fun with it.
          >




          --
          Jim Hart
            Conal OhAirt

          Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
        • gavinkilkenny
          ugh. Mine has some hammer marks on the back as well, but those I can live with more easily than the irregularities on the cutting edge. Agreed on the
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 16, 2012
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            ugh. Mine has some hammer marks on the back as well, but those I can live with more easily than the irregularities on the cutting edge.

            Agreed on the valuation issue. Scanning Ebay it's amazing the range, with some people demanding heavy premiums for items that are genuinely half a step from the dung heap!.

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Jim Hart <conalohairt@...> wrote:
            >
            > I saw one at an antique show that someone had used like a splitting froe...
            >
            > MULTIPLE times by the look of the thing.
            >
            > They used a steel hammer to beat on the back of the blade.
            >
            > The guy wanted $40 for it... I offered 25$ only because it had folding
            > handles...
            >
            > He looked insulted ( I hate tool collectors, they have convinced everyone
            > that old tools are
            > made from solid gold )
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Sun, Nov 11, 2012 at 2:56 PM, Diane <dianerzebet@...> wrote:
            >
            > > **
            > >
            > >
            > > I just hate it when people ruin a perfectly good tool through ignorance or
            > > impatience. A shame. Good luck. Are you a goo sharpener yourself or do you
            > > know some one who is a blade maker or cutlerer? They might have some valid
            > > suggestions on rehabilitation of the blade.
            > >
            > > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "gavinkilkenny" <dukegavin@>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I got lucky and won a wetherby draw knife auction at a very modest price.
            > > >
            > > > Then it arrived and I got a good look at it... Why would someone grind a
            > > tool when they don't know how? The bad job of grinding this blade, done
            > > quite recently judging by how bright and shiny the scratches are still, is
            > > making it much more difficult to get this sharpened- at least I'm betting
            > > it wouldn't have been worse had they not put it to the grinder...
            > > >
            > > > It's a slender,almost delicate tool. I expect intended for carving work,
            > > more than hogging off a bunch of wood. I've got some projects in mind for
            > > it if I can get it tuned up.
            > > >
            > > > Oh yeah, whoever ground it also through a back bevel on there. Unevenly
            > > and probably more than it ought to be...
            > > >
            > > > But, it's a new toy and I will have fun with it.
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > Jim Hart
            > Conal OhAirt
            >
            > Aude Aliquid Digmun - *dare something worthy*
            >
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