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Re: Interested in making my own scribes/marking-gauges.

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  • karincorbin
    I put my 8 year old woodworking student to the task of making a marking gauge. If he can do it so can any one of you. His biggest problem so far is lack of
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 2, 2012
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      I put my 8 year old woodworking student to the task of making a marking gauge. If he can do it so can any one of you. His biggest problem so far is lack of hand strength therefore his control on cuts is not as good as it will be in a few years. But his joy at doing the work is unsurpassed.

      Karin

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Sean Powell <sean14powell@...> wrote:
      >
      > Well that's just stupid-simple. Why haven't I made one of these before?
      >
      > Sean
      >
      > On Tue, Oct 2, 2012 at 9:33 AM, gavinkilkenny <dukegavin@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/2011/08/31/another-mortise-gauge/
      > >
      > > It's a oouple of pictures and some discussion of a very simple mortising
      > > gauge. Worth looking at, if only as another example of just how simple
      > > these things can, and should, be.
      > >
      > > I would not think a razor knife blade made sense for the job. I've not
      > > seen a single example where the marking scribe was an edge rather than a
      > > point and I think there's something to that. You want to drag through,
      > > tearing up the wood to create your mark, and not being steered by grain. A
      > > short length of rod with a point does this better than an edge. The edge
      > > may be very stiff on one axis, but is more easily laterally deflected than
      > > the rod.
      > >
      > > At least, that's how I see it. Plus, you just push the nail through, or
      > > screw the screw in, while mounting an edge, as you're finding, is not so
      > > simple.
      > >
      >
    • Karl Newman
      Knife blade = Bad Idea. the blade will flex then try to track the grain. a stiff pin sharpened to an oval chisel tip is best the Pin is just a nail driven
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 2, 2012
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        Knife blade = Bad Idea. the blade will flex then try to track the grain.
         a stiff pin sharpened to an oval chisel tip is best
        the "Pin" is just a nail driven thru the beam
        K
        I have about a dozen different scribe designs I could put up on sketch up if anyone were interested.
        I commonly use (have on my bench) 3 scribes at any given time for any given project. the design that you refered to is an excellent one.
      • Barekr Silfri
        I learned how to make them by watching this: http://logancabinetshoppe.com/blog/2010/11/episode-29/ YIS, Bear
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 2, 2012
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          I learned how to make them by watching this:

          YIS,
          Bear

          On Tue, Oct 2, 2012 at 5:21 PM, Karl Newman <kaisaerpren@...> wrote:
           

          Knife blade = Bad Idea. the blade will flex then try to track the grain.
           a stiff pin sharpened to an oval chisel tip is best
          the "Pin" is just a nail driven thru the beam
          K
          I have about a dozen different scribe designs I could put up on sketch up if anyone were interested.
          I commonly use (have on my bench) 3 scribes at any given time for any given project. the design that you refered to is an excellent one.


        • gloerke
          Hi, I have made a marking gauge using an article in Fine Woodworking magazine. I have scanned the article and added it in the files section as Make
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 4, 2012
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            Hi,

            I have made a marking gauge using an article in Fine Woodworking magazine. I have scanned the article and added it in the files section as "Make gauge.pdf". Also in the photo section under Thomasguild I have uploaded some images of my gauge. I made the marking gauge several years ago from walnut, the marking pin is a nail which I have later given a "knife edge". The photo still shows the nail still having the point (which you can also use for marking).

            In my photo section there is also a scan of the marking gauges from the Mary Rose shipwreck (1548) taken from the book "before the mast. life and death on the mary rose" which I just had borrowed from the royal library this week ;)

            I hope this will be of interest and help making your marking gauge.

            Marijn
            St. Thomasguild
            (thomasguild.blogspot.nl)

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "sean14powell" <sean14powell@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello,
            >
            > Primarily I'm a power-tool user but with my biggest tools in storage I've been doing more small projects with hand tools and it's a different sort of fun. I've also been spending a lot of time watching Roy Underhill and The Woodwright shop. A lot of joinery work seems much easier using scribes to mark locations then a pencil and it's a wonderfully simple tool so I want to make one for myself but I'm curious how medieval versions held the marking tip before metal screws came into common usage and if there are better cutters then sharpened nails.
            >
            > This design just wedges the nail in place.
            > http://images.meredith.com/wood/pdf/WD324627.pdf
            >
            > In an ideal world I would think a piece of snap-off disposible razor knife would make a perfect tip but I can't think of how to anchor it without modern equipment.
            >
            > Anyone have any thoughts or ideas?
            >
            > Sean Powell
            >
          • conradh@efn.org
            ... Think wedges. Either the wedging of the cutter directly into the wood (such as a nail you then sharpen) or a separate wedge such as holds a plane iron.
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 14, 2012
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              > Hello,
              >
              > Primarily I'm a power-tool user but with my biggest tools in storage I've
              > been doing more small projects with hand tools and it's a different sort
              > of fun. I've also been spending a lot of time watching Roy Underhill and
              > The Woodwright shop. A lot of joinery work seems much easier using scribes
              > to mark locations then a pencil and it's a wonderfully simple tool so I
              > want to make one for myself but I'm curious how medieval versions held the
              > marking tip before metal screws came into common usage and if there are
              > better cutters then sharpened nails.
              >
              > This design just wedges the nail in place.
              > http://images.meredith.com/wood/pdf/WD324627.pdf
              >
              > In an ideal world I would think a piece of snap-off disposible razor knife
              > would make a perfect tip but I can't think of how to anchor it without
              > modern equipment.
              >
              Think wedges. Either the wedging of the cutter directly into the wood
              (such as a nail you then sharpen) or a separate wedge such as holds a
              plane iron. No screws required
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