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Re: Tapered mortise and tenon

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  • gavinkilkenny
    No lathe yet, although building a springpole variety is on the to-do list. And finally, after looking up compass saw (I had never come across the term...) I
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 1, 2012
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      No lathe yet, although building a springpole variety is on the to-do list. And finally, after looking up "compass saw" (I had never come across the term...) I get what JA is talking about. Even watching Curtis Buchanan work with one had not cleared it up for me - because I didn't know what the heck a "compass saw" was ..sigh...

      Gavin

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Johnson <jljonsn@...> wrote:
      >
      > Do you have access to a lathe?
      >
      > Jenny alexander provides info on how-to make a reamer and cutter here:
      >
      > http://www.greenwoodworking.com/ShavingHorsePlans
      >
      > On Sep 27, 2012 4:59 PM, "gavinkilkenny" <dukegavin@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I'm looking at a couple of projects that call for round tapered mortise and tenon joints. Not particularly difficult, but specialized tools are called for.
      > >
      > > Looking around a bit, reamers and tapered tenon cutters seem to be a bit pricey. Wondering if anyone has some suggestions on sourcing this sort of tool at a reasonable price - or maybe just the information that the Lee Valley versions with the accompanying price tags are the "reasonable price" version ;)
      > >
      > > Gavin
      > >
      > >
      >
    • conradh@efn.org
      ... I ve made one of these, and it wasn t that hard to do; basically a bigger version of a pencil sharpener, in hardwood. ... I believe the wheelwright in the
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 25, 2012
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        Brusi of Orkney wrote:

        > The tapered tennon is made with a 'spail engine' - there are a heap of
        > different names depending on location & trade - if you have seen the
        > re-issue video's of the Woodwright's shop, Roy shows how to make one in
        > one of the early shows. It can also be used to make rake handles and
        > similar long round shafts, depending on how you set the cutting blade.

        I've made one of these, and it wasn't that hard to do; basically a bigger
        version of a pencil sharpener, in hardwood.

        >
        > A tapered hole reamer is used in other medieval trades too, such as for
        > making bung holes in barrels as well as wheelwrighting. Big reamers had a
        > hardwood body with an inset wedged blade, but it would be well within the
        > technology for a tapered all metal tool to be used, I just dont know of
        > any surviving ones.

        I believe the wheelwright in the Standartarbuch (mid 16th Century) is
        shown using a big taper reamer with an all-metal blade--the same kind used
        into the 19th Century. So they actually did it, at least toward the end
        of the period.

        Blacksmiths use a taper reamer that's much simpler: just a tapered strip
        of high carbon steel, with relief ground on the two edges to make them
        cut. You can grind one out of an old file or piece of leaf spring,
        depending on the size you want. I would normalize (heat the tool red-hot
        after grinding, then allow to cool in air) in the case of the file,
        because it's very high carbon and the twisting might snap it in use.

        If you make the reamer first, you can use it to ream the hole in the stail
        engine/rounder plane/taper cutter/whatever you call it. Then install your
        blade parallel to the reamed surface of the cone.

        Ulfhedinn
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