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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Hello, all

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  • Peter Ellison
    I m about to head down the green path.  I really enjoyed reading the Making a stool from a tree and really want to try the process, also watching old
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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      I'm about to head down the green path.  I really enjoyed reading the "Making a stool from a tree" and really want to try the process, also watching old Woodwright shows is also making the process seem much more doable.  I need to do is find a suitable tree for the stool project.

      On a related note I have two pine trees that have to come down the drought has been hard on evergreens in my yard, might need to take down a third one.  The local tree guys sound willing to cut the trees down so that the timber can be salvaged.

      I was going to request that they cut the chunks in 6-8 feet of the main trunk.  I figured that I'd be able to move a piece that sized.  Then strip the bark and hew them up into timbers and figure out what to do with them later (I'd like to make a new workbench out of them).  Worst case the dude next door is a burly lad with a chain saw who likes backyard fires :-)

      I'm guessing that it will be a fair amount of work to hew the timbers, how did you square them, an axe, saw or adze ?

      Peter

      > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
      >
      > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to
      > remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a
      > pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then
      > I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe
      > too.
      >
      > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so
      > I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in
      > the winter.
      >
      > Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
      >
      > Gavin Kilkenny
      >
      >
    • Gille MacDhnouill
      I ve done a little in the past, but I have 6 large (20-24 dia by 3+ feet long) red oak logs in my side yard now that will become joint stools pretty soon. I
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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        I've done a little in the past, but I have 6 large (20-24" dia by 3+ feet long) red oak logs in my side yard now that will become joint stools pretty soon. I have to find some boards to throw up a riving break this weekend, then I'm going to start splitting. Green oak is wicked heavy - I'll be glad to get them down into workable sections.

        About 2 years ago my friend Steve scored a green Walnut trunk section (~20-24" diameter by about a foot long). We split that down, and I made some plane totes and a greasebox. Boy that was fun - easy to work, and beautiful results.

        Keep up the good work!
        -----Gille MacDhnouill, ACG, AEthelmearc

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "gavinkilkenny" <dukegavin@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
        >
        > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe too.
        >
        > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in the winter.
        >
        > Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
        >
        > Gavin Kilkenny
        >
      • gavinkilkenny
        I got a good sized broad axe off of EBay (about 11 pounds, edge somewhere around 12 +-) and between that and a felling axe, hewed the pine beam. It is heavy
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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          I got a good sized broad axe off of EBay (about 11 pounds, edge somewhere around 12" +-) and between that and a felling axe, hewed the pine beam. It is heavy work - especially with such a heavy axe ;)
          but in some ways easier than I thought it would be. I think years of hitting moving targets with a stick made hitting a precise stationary target with an axe relatively simple.

          One thing I strongly recommend that I still haven't got hold of myself - log dogs. It really makes the job easier if the log is not trying to move on you the whole time!



          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Ellison" <pellison@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > I'm about to head down the green path.  I really enjoyed reading the
          > "Making a stool from a tree" and really want to try the process,
          > also watching old Woodwright shows is also making the process seem much
          > more doable.  I need to do is find a suitable tree for the stool
          > project.
          >
          > On a related note I have two pine trees that have to
          > come down the drought has been hard on evergreens in my yard, might need
          > to take down a third one.  The local tree guys sound willing to cut
          > the trees down so that the timber can be salvaged.
          >
          > I was going
          > to request that they cut the chunks in 6-8 feet of the main trunk.  I
          > figured that I'd be able to move a piece that sized.  Then strip the
          > bark and hew them up into timbers and figure out what to do with them
          > later (I'd like to make a new workbench out of them).  Worst case the
          > dude next door is a burly lad with a chain saw who likes backyard fires
          > :-)
          >
          > I'm guessing that it will be a fair amount of work to hew
          > the timbers, how did you square them, an axe, saw or adze ?
          >
          > Peter
          >
          > > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
          > >
          > > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to
          > having to
          > > remove several trees from my property this summer.
          > Hewn a beam from a
          > > pine log, made a cleaving break, currently
          > working on a workbench and then
          > > I need to redo my shaving horse.
          > At some point there will be a pole lathe
          > > too.
          > >
          > > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas
          > roof so
          > > I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove
          > to let me work in
          > > the winter.
          > >
          > > Anyone else
          > working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
          > >
          > >
          > Gavin Kilkenny
          > >
          > >
          >
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