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  • gavinkilkenny
    Thanks Conal for letting me join ;) I ve been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to remove several trees from my property this summer.
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 6, 2012
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      Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)

      I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe too.

      And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in the winter.

      Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?

      Gavin Kilkenny
    • bsrlee
      Lucky you. Us city dwellers can only envy those with ready access to fresh felled trees. Here any trees that are to be felled are first cut into short lengths
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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        Lucky you. Us city dwellers can only envy those with ready access to
        fresh felled trees. Here any trees that are to be felled are first cut
        into short lengths rather than dropped, then wood chipped - local
        government bodies will not allow 'urban salvage' for some diety forsaken
        reason.

        regards
        Brusi of Orkney
        Rowany/Lochac

        On 07-Sep-12 10:47 AM, gavinkilkenny wrote:
        > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
        >
        > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe too.
        >
        > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in the winter.
        >
        > Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
        >
        > Gavin Kilkenny
        >
      • conradh@efn.org
        ... I do a fair amount with green wood, or wood I cut and season myself rather than buy. I do a lot with local Oregon ash, mostly tool handles for tools I
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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          > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
          >
          > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to
          > remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a
          > pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then
          > I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe
          > too.
          >
          > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so
          > I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in
          > the winter.
          >
          > Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
          >
          I do a fair amount with green wood, or wood I cut and season myself rather
          than buy. I do a lot with local Oregon ash, mostly tool handles for tools
          I make and/or restore. I have a big cherry bowl that's half-hewn, sitting
          in a plastic bag in the shop right now, so it won't dry out and crack. Our
          metalworking shop is _very_ hard on wooden mallets--I use them for
          straightening red-hot twisted iron pieces, and Margaret uses them for
          finish shaping of dished metal bowls she makes. So every year we end up
          needing a new mallet head or two--some of our handles have had six or
          seven heads over the years. I make them out of crossgrained limb prunings
          from our walnut trees. I put them on green and let them shrink onto the
          handles as they dry. The extra weight of the green wood is welcome, and
          they last long enough to be useful.

          Right now most of the wood I'm working is firewood for the winter; our
          local dry season has dried it out beautifully, and we have to get four
          cords under cover before the rains come again. We're almost done. It's a
          mix of softwood from an old shop building we're tearing down for the
          neighbor next door, and hardwood from trees I've cut down for various
          friends around town. Back when I was young and stupid I actually went out
          of town to get wood--since then I've discovered just how much is available
          in the city--much of it within a mile or two.

          Ulfhedinn
        • maf@gleichen.ca
          I live rural and we had a tornado last month that dropped over a hundred trees in our town mostly poplars and pines and a couple of elm trees. The local county
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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            I live rural and we had a tornado last month that dropped over a hundred trees in our town mostly poplars and pines and a couple of elm trees. The local county sent crews in to take all the trees away, they even went onto private property to retrieve them then course chipped everyone of the trees they took. They are so coarsely chipped it’s like chunks that are too big for mulch or animal bedding and too small to burn. So now we have a pile on public land that is 30+ feet in diameter and about 6 feet tall no one wants or can use. What a waste.
             
            I managed to snag my pine tree and an elm tree by quickly removing the part on county land (yard verge) and telling them if they entered my property I’d charge them with trespassing. Some people had chopped up their trees before the county came and had the logs stacked on there own land and the workers just went in and took the stacks of lumber and logs. I also noticed that some logs ended up in a county storage yard and are now listed on kijji for sale at $95 per pick up truck load. Got to love it, so it’s not just urban gov’t with a belief that trees need to be chipped.
             
            From: bsrlee
            Sent: Friday, September 07, 2012 1:37 AM
            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Hello, all
             
             

            Lucky you. Us city dwellers can only envy those with ready access to
            fresh felled trees. Here any trees that are to be felled are first cut
            into short lengths rather than dropped, then wood chipped - local
            government bodies will not allow 'urban salvage' for some diety forsaken
            reason.

            regards
            Brusi of Orkney
            Rowany/Lochac

            On 07-Sep-12 10:47 AM, gavinkilkenny wrote:

            > Thanks Conal for letting me
            join ;)
            >
            > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood,
            thanks to having to remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe too.
            >
            > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls
            and a canvas roof so I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in the winter.
            >
            > Anyone else working greenwood, rather
            than kiln dried stuff?
            >
            > Gavin Kilkenny
            >

          • Peter Ellison
            I m about to head down the green path.  I really enjoyed reading the Making a stool from a tree and really want to try the process, also watching old
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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              I'm about to head down the green path.  I really enjoyed reading the "Making a stool from a tree" and really want to try the process, also watching old Woodwright shows is also making the process seem much more doable.  I need to do is find a suitable tree for the stool project.

              On a related note I have two pine trees that have to come down the drought has been hard on evergreens in my yard, might need to take down a third one.  The local tree guys sound willing to cut the trees down so that the timber can be salvaged.

              I was going to request that they cut the chunks in 6-8 feet of the main trunk.  I figured that I'd be able to move a piece that sized.  Then strip the bark and hew them up into timbers and figure out what to do with them later (I'd like to make a new workbench out of them).  Worst case the dude next door is a burly lad with a chain saw who likes backyard fires :-)

              I'm guessing that it will be a fair amount of work to hew the timbers, how did you square them, an axe, saw or adze ?

              Peter

              > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
              >
              > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to
              > remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a
              > pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then
              > I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe
              > too.
              >
              > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so
              > I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in
              > the winter.
              >
              > Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
              >
              > Gavin Kilkenny
              >
              >
            • Gille MacDhnouill
              I ve done a little in the past, but I have 6 large (20-24 dia by 3+ feet long) red oak logs in my side yard now that will become joint stools pretty soon. I
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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                I've done a little in the past, but I have 6 large (20-24" dia by 3+ feet long) red oak logs in my side yard now that will become joint stools pretty soon. I have to find some boards to throw up a riving break this weekend, then I'm going to start splitting. Green oak is wicked heavy - I'll be glad to get them down into workable sections.

                About 2 years ago my friend Steve scored a green Walnut trunk section (~20-24" diameter by about a foot long). We split that down, and I made some plane totes and a greasebox. Boy that was fun - easy to work, and beautiful results.

                Keep up the good work!
                -----Gille MacDhnouill, ACG, AEthelmearc

                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "gavinkilkenny" <dukegavin@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
                >
                > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to having to remove several trees from my property this summer. Hewn a beam from a pine log, made a cleaving break, currently working on a workbench and then I need to redo my shaving horse. At some point there will be a pole lathe too.
                >
                > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas roof so I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove to let me work in the winter.
                >
                > Anyone else working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
                >
                > Gavin Kilkenny
                >
              • gavinkilkenny
                I got a good sized broad axe off of EBay (about 11 pounds, edge somewhere around 12 +-) and between that and a felling axe, hewed the pine beam. It is heavy
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 7, 2012
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                  I got a good sized broad axe off of EBay (about 11 pounds, edge somewhere around 12" +-) and between that and a felling axe, hewed the pine beam. It is heavy work - especially with such a heavy axe ;)
                  but in some ways easier than I thought it would be. I think years of hitting moving targets with a stick made hitting a precise stationary target with an axe relatively simple.

                  One thing I strongly recommend that I still haven't got hold of myself - log dogs. It really makes the job easier if the log is not trying to move on you the whole time!



                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Ellison" <pellison@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I'm about to head down the green path.  I really enjoyed reading the
                  > "Making a stool from a tree" and really want to try the process,
                  > also watching old Woodwright shows is also making the process seem much
                  > more doable.  I need to do is find a suitable tree for the stool
                  > project.
                  >
                  > On a related note I have two pine trees that have to
                  > come down the drought has been hard on evergreens in my yard, might need
                  > to take down a third one.  The local tree guys sound willing to cut
                  > the trees down so that the timber can be salvaged.
                  >
                  > I was going
                  > to request that they cut the chunks in 6-8 feet of the main trunk.  I
                  > figured that I'd be able to move a piece that sized.  Then strip the
                  > bark and hew them up into timbers and figure out what to do with them
                  > later (I'd like to make a new workbench out of them).  Worst case the
                  > dude next door is a burly lad with a chain saw who likes backyard fires
                  > :-)
                  >
                  > I'm guessing that it will be a fair amount of work to hew
                  > the timbers, how did you square them, an axe, saw or adze ?
                  >
                  > Peter
                  >
                  > > Thanks Conal for letting me join ;)
                  > >
                  > > I've been working a bit this summer with greenwood, thanks to
                  > having to
                  > > remove several trees from my property this summer.
                  > Hewn a beam from a
                  > > pine log, made a cleaving break, currently
                  > working on a workbench and then
                  > > I need to redo my shaving horse.
                  > At some point there will be a pole lathe
                  > > too.
                  > >
                  > > And probably a post and beam frame with wattle walls and a canvas
                  > roof so
                  > > I can work when it rains- maybe even a little wood stove
                  > to let me work in
                  > > the winter.
                  > >
                  > > Anyone else
                  > working greenwood, rather than kiln dried stuff?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > Gavin Kilkenny
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
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