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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Sugar Maple

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  • Jeffrey Johnson
    You may find the top of the limb has rings more closely spaced. YMMV ... maple than I did originally and I really appreciate the help. ... the bottom, say if
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 28, 2012

      You may find the top of the limb has rings more closely spaced. YMMV

      On Jun 27, 2012 4:21 PM, "Kirstyn" <khaentlahn@...> wrote:
      >
      >  
      >
      > Thank you to everyone who responded. I definitely know a bit more about maple than I did originally and I really appreciate the help.
      >
      > Just out of curiosity, is there a way to identify the top of a limb from the bottom, say if you find a limb that has already fallen from a tree and the branches still attached don't make it overly obvious?
      >
      > TIA,
      > Kirstyn
      >
      >
      > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, leaking pen <itsatrap@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Enh. If you can identify the top and bottom side, and make a series of
      > > cuts every 6-12 inches through the bottom before letting it dry, you can
      > > get a pretty straight top after drying.
      > >
      > > On Wed, Jun 27, 2012 at 9:33 AM, Avery Austringer
      > > <avery1415@...>wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > >
      > > > As Jeffrey said, you're going to be dealing with the limb, which has been
      > > > dealing with holding up a bunch of twigs and leaves against the pull of
      > > > gravity since forever, suddenly not having to deal with that force at all.
      > > > The magic phrase to throw into Google is "Reaction Wood". In fact, if you
      > > > are a visual person like I tend to be, the first few pictures in a Google
      > > > image search for that term will tell you most of what you need to know.
      > > > You're not going to be able to make furniture with this wood, and I'd
      > > > probably avoid the table saw since there is a chance of the wood flexing
      > > > and binding the blade as you make your cut. (This is still a problem with
      > > > a band or hand saw, but there it's not a problem that can cause serious
      > > > injury.)
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > OK, now that you know what you're dealing with, time to figure out what to
      > > > do with some wood. Unless you have a project in mind where you need some
      > > > very curved wood (like wagon bails or the bows of an ox collar) you're
      > > > probably going to want shorter pieces - 12 to 18 inches. There is also a
      > > > minimum "worth screwing with" diameter that you need to fix in your heart
      > > > based on what you want to do. If you're carving that might be an inch or
      > > > two. Larger if you're turning. Larger still for any kind of joinery.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > First thing I'd do is sort the kindling from the useful wood and put it
      > > > somewhere out of the weather. Then I'd cut to wood that might be useful
      > > > into bite sized chunks, like I said, a foot or so, and paint the ends with
      > > > a latex paint to prevent all the moisture from escaping from the end grain
      > > > and causing splitting. Then I'd see about peeling off the bark and putting
      > > > it somewhere to dry.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Avery
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      >

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