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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Finished. Except for the finish....

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  • Barekr Silfri
    So I don t recall the source for this recipe but it was dated around 1500 I think as that would be why I saved it. Bear
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 12, 2012
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    So I don't recall the source for this recipe but it was dated around 1500 I think as that would be why I saved it.

    Bear

    On Tue, Jun 12, 2012 at 8:31 AM, Barekr Silfri <barekrsilfri@...> wrote:
    You could always do a walnut stain. I have a recipe somewhere I'll try to dig up. 

    Bear


    On Monday, June 11, 2012, Avery Austringer wrote:
     

    So I have some pine boxes that I cranked out a while back that are sort of done using the joinery of the Mastermyr find though the boxes are built to different scales. These have been sitting around my shop for a while collecting dust and I think it's high time I put a finish on them and find them a home. Now, normally, I like to work in white oak, apply linseed oil and then bathe in the radiance thus produced but I'm thinking pine isn't quite going to have the same effect. I'd also briefly considered slathering them down with milk paint but that isn't exactly exciting me either, though if someone has a really solid documentation for some appealing color from some time between 1000 and 1200 AD, I might be OK with that.

    Any clever advice out there?

    Avery


  • Geirfold
    A bee swax/linseed paste will give it a nice finish and give the pine a slight yellowish hue.
    Message 2 of 4 , Jun 12, 2012
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      A bee'swax/linseed paste will give it a nice finish and give the pine a slight yellowish hue.

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Avery Austringer <avery1415@...> wrote:
      >
      > So I have some pine boxes that I cranked out a while back that are sort of done
      > using the joinery of the Mastermyr find though the boxes are built to different
      > scales. These have been sitting around my shop for a while collecting dust and I
      > think it's high time I put a finish on them and find them a home. Now, normally,
      > I like to work in white oak, apply linseed oil and then bathe in the radiance
      > thus produced but I'm thinking pine isn't quite going to have the same effect.
      > I'd also briefly considered slathering them down with milk paint but that isn't
      > exactly exciting me either, though if someone has a really solid documentation
      > for some appealing color from some time between 1000 and 1200 AD, I might be OK
      > with that.
      >
      > Any clever advice out there?
      >
      > Avery
      >
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