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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Hardware sources

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  • conradh@efn.org
    ... Miriam--I do have a forge, and I ve made several Viking chest locks and padlocks. I find the trick is to get this oddly shaped key to slide into the lock
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
      > I made the lock for this box on the principle of some viking locks, it was
      > tricky and doesnt work as well as I would like. If you make the sort of
      > lock plate and staple that I used you can put a basic wardrobe lock on the
      > inside for about the same effect. 8->
      >
      Miriam--I do have a forge, and I've made several Viking chest locks and
      padlocks. I find the trick is to get this oddly shaped key to slide into
      the lock without hanging up, but also without too much slop. Practice
      helps, but generally make everything too tight to begin with, and then
      file the holes and parts a _little_ bit at a time until they just fit. It
      also helps to add a few scraps of sheet metal "L"'s around the keyhole to
      guide the key into the pivot hole, but still allow the key to rotate once
      it's seated all the way.

      To people used to the precision of modern Yale tumbler locks, the sloppy
      tolerances of a lot of Dark Ages locksmithing takes some getting used to.
      This is one reason why lock designs were so diverse in period--a medieval
      town would have locks of more basic types than a modern town uses, just
      because it was the only way the locksmith could provide unique keys to all
      his customers.

      Today, they can be quite secure--just because it would take a modern
      locksmith half an hour just to figure out how they worked, and how to get
      into something so barbaric! While the maker, like you or I, could
      probably open the thing in two minutes or less with some bent bits of coat
      hanger wire.

      Hinges are fun to forge; which reminds me I need to get off the damn
      computer and make some more. I nearly sold out of strap hinges at Egils
      Tourney last week. One of the Usual Suspects here had a woodworking setup
      where they were making six-board chests, and came over to my booth for
      snipe hinges and my last pair of Rhineland heart-finial strap hinges.

      Ulfhedinn
    • Michael Sheldon
      This one I had not seen before. They have some nice looking hinges. Michael Sheldon Greyhounds of Fairhaven
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
        This one I had not seen before. They have some nice looking hinges.

        Michael Sheldon
        Greyhounds of Fairhaven

        On 06/04/2012 01:30 AM, Jim Looper wrote:
        > http://www.kingmetals.com/Home.aspx
        >
        > Better prices than most from what I have seen...
        >
        > Lucien
        > ...we can burn that river when we cross a bridge over a bush with two birds in glass houses.
      • Michael Sheldon
        I d seen these guys before, and for some reason missed a lot of what they have. Thanks for pointing me back there. Michael Sheldon Greyhounds of Fairhaven
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
          I'd seen these guys before, and for some reason missed a lot of what
          they have. Thanks for pointing me back there.

          Michael Sheldon
          Greyhounds of Fairhaven

          On 06/03/2012 11:54 PM, Alex Haugland wrote:
          >
          >
          > www.leevalley.com has some wonderful strap hinges that I've used quite a
          > bit. Check under their hardware section. They also carry Tremont cut
          > nails. Locks are much trickier...
          >
          > --Alysaundre Weldon
          > Barony of Adiantum, An Tir
        • Michael Sheldon
          On the subject of Tremont Nails. If you order direct from them, they have a Steel Cut Nail Sample Set, that has one each of all the nails they produce on a
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
            On the subject of Tremont Nails.

            If you order direct from them, they have a Steel Cut Nail Sample Set,
            that has one each of all the nails they produce on a display card. It's
            quite helpful for those of use who like/need to see and touch so we know
            what we're looking for.


            If you buy a lot of nails, they'll even sell you Cedar nail kegs to hold
            them :)


            Michael Sheldon
            Greyhounds of Fairhaven
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