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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Hardware sources

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  • Michael Sheldon
    It has occured to me to make my own. And it s still a possibility. I like what you ve done. But I m already suffering from having too many tasks on my list and
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 3, 2012
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      It has occured to me to make my own. And it's still a possibility. I
      like what you've done.

      But I'm already suffering from having too many tasks on my list and not
      enough time. :) Buying hardware lets me get more off my backlog.


      Michael Sheldon
      Greyhounds of Fairhaven

      On 06/03/2012 06:34 PM, Laura Iseman wrote:
      >
      >
      > I find that basic strap hinges are fairly easy to make. I cold work mine
      > so I don't need a forge, a piece of railway iron and a beaked hammer
      > (one normal side and one that looks like a flat headed screwdriver,
      > someone will know the right name for this I am sure) a bench vice, a
      > hacksaw and some pliers are all the tools you need. If you want to fancy
      > the ends a forge is helpful but not essential.
      >
      > You can see pictures at
      > http://www.flickr.com/photos/36906401@N00/sets/72157618165002297/
      >
      > I made the lock for this box on the principle of some viking locks, it
      > was tricky and doesnt work as well as I would like. If you make the sort
      > of lock plate and staple that I used you can put a basic wardrobe lock
      > on the inside for about the same effect. 8->
      >
      > Cheers, and have fun,
      >
      > Miriam.
      >
      > On Mon, Jun 4, 2012 at 10:27 AM, Michael Sheldon
      > <msheldon@... <mailto:msheldon@...>> wrote:
      >
      > __
      >
      > I'm in the process of making several boxes and chests for my
      > encampment,
      > but finding hinges, locks, etc seem a bit hit-or-miss.
      >
      > Anyone have favourite sources to share?
      >
      > These ones have some things I like:
      >
      > Van Dykes Restorers: http://www.vandykes.com
      > Renovator's Supply: http://www.rensup.com/
      >
      > And if you use nails, Tremont Nail Company have a great selection of
      > early 19th century nails. http://www.tremontnail.com/
      >
      > Michael Sheldon
      > Greyhounds of Fairhaven
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > "The test of a vocation is the love of the drudgery it involves." --
      > Logan Pearsall Smith
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Alex Haugland
      www.leevalley.com has some wonderful strap hinges that I ve used quite a bit. Check under their hardware section. They also carry Tremont cut nails. Locks
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 3, 2012
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        www.leevalley.com has some wonderful strap hinges that I've used quite a bit.  Check under their hardware section.  They also carry Tremont cut nails.  Locks are much trickier...

        --Alysaundre Weldon
        Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

        On 6/3/2012 5:27 PM, Michael Sheldon wrote:
         

        I'm in the process of making several boxes and chests for my encampment,
        but finding hinges, locks, etc seem a bit hit-or-miss.

        Anyone have favourite sources to share?

        These ones have some things I like:

        Van Dykes Restorers: http://www.vandykes.com
        Renovator's Supply: http://www.rensup.com/

        And if you use nails, Tremont Nail Company have a great selection of
        early 19th century nails. http://www.tremontnail.com/

        Michael Sheldon
        Greyhounds of Fairhaven


      • Jim Looper
        http://www.kingmetals.com/Home.aspx Better prices than most from what I have seen... Lucien ... From: Michael Sheldon To:
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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          http://www.kingmetals.com/Home.aspx

          Better prices than most from what I have seen...

          Lucien
          ...we can burn that river when we cross a bridge over a bush with two birds in glass houses.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Michael Sheldon <msheldon@...>
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, 03 Jun 2012 20:27:54 -0400 (EDT)
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Hardware sources

          I'm in the process of making several boxes and chests for my encampment,
          but finding hinges, locks, etc seem a bit hit-or-miss.

          Anyone have favourite sources to share?



          These ones have some things I like:

          Van Dykes Restorers: http://www.vandykes.com
          Renovator's Supply: http://www.rensup.com/


          And if you use nails, Tremont Nail Company have a great selection of
          early 19th century nails. http://www.tremontnail.com/



          Michael Sheldon
          Greyhounds of Fairhaven


          ------------------------------------
        • Thylacine
          Which of the tremont nails do most people use? I have been looking at them for a while but just have not yet ordered any and keep alternating on which styles
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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            Which of the tremont nails do most people use? I have been looking at them for a while but just have not yet ordered any and keep alternating on which styles to get..
            Thanks
            Thylacine
            Barony of Hidden Mountain


          • Peter Ellison
            I use the 4D finishing nails the most. If you order through them 3 boxes of nails is roughly $25. I chose the box nails (as I was building a box from the Chris
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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              I use the 4D finishing nails the most.

              If you order through them 3 boxes of nails is roughly $25.

              I chose the box nails (as I was building a box from the Chris S. book :-)
              The finishing nails, and the normal 4D nails.

              Both the box and the regular 4D nails are pretty big.

              If you are unsure I'd suggest that you check out:
              http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/

              They offer 1/2 lbs of the nails, and you could try a wider range of nails.  I'd suggest trying a few of a could different types.  The ones with wrought heads look cool.

              Don't forget these NEED to be pre-drilled, if you are nailing something thin cinch them.

              Peter


              > Which of the tremont nails do most people use? I have been looking at them
              > for a while but just have not yet ordered any and keep alternating on
              > which
              > styles to get..
              > Thanks
              > Thylacine
              > Barony of Hidden Mountain
              >
            • Michael Sheldon
              I m very fond of the rose-head clinch nails. One thing to remember with cut nails is that grain direction matters to the alignment of the nail. Otherwise I
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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                I'm very fond of the rose-head clinch nails. One thing to remember with cut nails is that grain direction matters to the alignment of the nail. Otherwise I actually prefer using cut nails over modern nails.

                And of course with clinch nails, they need to be a bit longer than the material is thick, so you can clinch them on the back.

                Michael Sheldon
                Greyhounds of Fairhaven

                Thylacine <thylacine@...> wrote:

                Which of the tremont nails do most people use? I have been looking at them for a while but just have not yet ordered any and keep alternating on which styles to get..
                Thanks
                Thylacine
                Barony of Hidden Mountain


              • Michael Sheldon
                I ve found that I only need to pre-drill for cut nails if the pieces I m joining have different grain directions or with thin (under 3/4 ) low-quality (Home
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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                  I've found that I only need to pre-drill for cut nails if the pieces I'm joining have different grain directions or with thin (under 3/4") low-quality (Home Depot) pine. Otherwise I just align them with the grain and pound them in. They drive in much cleaner and easier than with modern nails.

                  Michael Sheldon
                  Greyhounds of Fairhaven

                  Peter Ellison <pellison@...> wrote:

                  I use the 4D finishing nails the most.

                  If you order through them 3 boxes of nails is roughly $25.

                  I chose the box nails (as I was building a box from the Chris S. book :-)
                  The finishing nails, and the normal 4D nails.

                  Both the box and the regular 4D nails are pretty big.

                  If you are unsure I'd suggest that you check out:
                  http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/

                  They offer 1/2 lbs of the nails, and you could try a wider range of nails.  I'd suggest trying a few of a could different types.  The ones with wrought heads look cool.

                  Don't forget these NEED to be pre-drilled, if you are nailing something thin cinch them.

                  Peter


                  > Which of the tremont nails do most people use? I have been looking at them
                  > for a while but just have not yet ordered any and keep alternating on
                  > which
                  > styles to get..
                  > Thanks
                  > Thylacine
                  > Barony of Hidden Mountain
                  >
                • conradh@efn.org
                  ... Miriam--I do have a forge, and I ve made several Viking chest locks and padlocks. I find the trick is to get this oddly shaped key to slide into the lock
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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                    > I made the lock for this box on the principle of some viking locks, it was
                    > tricky and doesnt work as well as I would like. If you make the sort of
                    > lock plate and staple that I used you can put a basic wardrobe lock on the
                    > inside for about the same effect. 8->
                    >
                    Miriam--I do have a forge, and I've made several Viking chest locks and
                    padlocks. I find the trick is to get this oddly shaped key to slide into
                    the lock without hanging up, but also without too much slop. Practice
                    helps, but generally make everything too tight to begin with, and then
                    file the holes and parts a _little_ bit at a time until they just fit. It
                    also helps to add a few scraps of sheet metal "L"'s around the keyhole to
                    guide the key into the pivot hole, but still allow the key to rotate once
                    it's seated all the way.

                    To people used to the precision of modern Yale tumbler locks, the sloppy
                    tolerances of a lot of Dark Ages locksmithing takes some getting used to.
                    This is one reason why lock designs were so diverse in period--a medieval
                    town would have locks of more basic types than a modern town uses, just
                    because it was the only way the locksmith could provide unique keys to all
                    his customers.

                    Today, they can be quite secure--just because it would take a modern
                    locksmith half an hour just to figure out how they worked, and how to get
                    into something so barbaric! While the maker, like you or I, could
                    probably open the thing in two minutes or less with some bent bits of coat
                    hanger wire.

                    Hinges are fun to forge; which reminds me I need to get off the damn
                    computer and make some more. I nearly sold out of strap hinges at Egils
                    Tourney last week. One of the Usual Suspects here had a woodworking setup
                    where they were making six-board chests, and came over to my booth for
                    snipe hinges and my last pair of Rhineland heart-finial strap hinges.

                    Ulfhedinn
                  • Michael Sheldon
                    This one I had not seen before. They have some nice looking hinges. Michael Sheldon Greyhounds of Fairhaven
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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                      This one I had not seen before. They have some nice looking hinges.

                      Michael Sheldon
                      Greyhounds of Fairhaven

                      On 06/04/2012 01:30 AM, Jim Looper wrote:
                      > http://www.kingmetals.com/Home.aspx
                      >
                      > Better prices than most from what I have seen...
                      >
                      > Lucien
                      > ...we can burn that river when we cross a bridge over a bush with two birds in glass houses.
                    • Michael Sheldon
                      I d seen these guys before, and for some reason missed a lot of what they have. Thanks for pointing me back there. Michael Sheldon Greyhounds of Fairhaven
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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                        I'd seen these guys before, and for some reason missed a lot of what
                        they have. Thanks for pointing me back there.

                        Michael Sheldon
                        Greyhounds of Fairhaven

                        On 06/03/2012 11:54 PM, Alex Haugland wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > www.leevalley.com has some wonderful strap hinges that I've used quite a
                        > bit. Check under their hardware section. They also carry Tremont cut
                        > nails. Locks are much trickier...
                        >
                        > --Alysaundre Weldon
                        > Barony of Adiantum, An Tir
                      • Michael Sheldon
                        On the subject of Tremont Nails. If you order direct from them, they have a Steel Cut Nail Sample Set, that has one each of all the nails they produce on a
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jun 4, 2012
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                          On the subject of Tremont Nails.

                          If you order direct from them, they have a Steel Cut Nail Sample Set,
                          that has one each of all the nails they produce on a display card. It's
                          quite helpful for those of use who like/need to see and touch so we know
                          what we're looking for.


                          If you buy a lot of nails, they'll even sell you Cedar nail kegs to hold
                          them :)


                          Michael Sheldon
                          Greyhounds of Fairhaven
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