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  • Avery Austringer
    ... Heh. When I found that one I was cruising E-bay for cheap hollows and rounds, so it s not that I m opposed to wooden planes. Still, I can t help being
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 30, 2011
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      >Honestly I think if your doing period work, your far better off with wooden
      >planes. Particularly if you do green woodworking. Many woods, like oak
      >have chemicals that interact with the steel plane and cause staining. FYI

      Heh. When I found that one I was cruising E-bay for cheap hollows and rounds,
      so it's not that I'm opposed to wooden planes. Still, I can't help being
      impressed by the modification, even if there are a couple technical issues with
      it (like too big of a plane mouth).

      On a not unrelated topic, does anyone know a place where someone can buy quarter
      or rift sawn 8/4 beech? (A2 Steel is easy.)

      Avery
    • Peter Ellison
      I was unable to find anything other than 4/4 beech.  Locally (Minnesota) two places carried the 4/4 so that is what I went with. I have make a couple of
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 31, 2011
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        I was unable to find anything other than 4/4 beech.  Locally (Minnesota) two places carried the 4/4 so that is what I went with.

        I have make a couple of wooden planes by gluing up my own block and working from there.  Since the rest of the plane was going to be laminated up one more seam would not be an issue.  I really like the "Philly Planes" the design is great for starting up, as it eliminates the difficult mortice and your first plane works right out of the gate.

        http://www.philsville.co.uk/
        The select "Projects" and "Jack Plane" for an over view of the process.

        Don't forget that you can make a plane from pretty much any hardwood that you wish, there are historical examples for a number of different woods.  In Europe beech was common and not a furniture wood, also it happens to have lots of other good properties that make is a good tool wood.  I forget which modern wood plane maker builds most of his with Cherry because he can source blocks of it. 

        I got a nice turning block of Ash that was perfectly cut for plane making, so when I get up the energy I'm going to cut the mortice fully by hand ...

        Peter


        >>Honestly I think if your doing period work, your far better off with
        >> wooden
        >>planes. Particularly if you do green woodworking. Many woods, like
        >> oak
        >>have chemicals that interact with the steel plane and cause staining.
        >> FYI
        >
        > Heh. When I found that one I was cruising E-bay for cheap hollows and
        > rounds,
        > so it's not that I'm opposed to wooden planes. Still, I can't help being
        > impressed by the modification, even if there are a couple technical issues
        > with
        > it (like too big of a plane mouth).
        >
        > On a not unrelated topic, does anyone know a place where someone can buy
        > quarter
        > or rift sawn 8/4 beech? (A2 Steel is easy.)
        >
        > Avery
        >
        >
      • conradh@efn.org
        ...   ... I did that--built a monster jointer copying the one in Bourdichon s shop painting of about 1500. I used local ash from a hardwood dealer here in
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 3, 2012
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          >

          > Don't forget that you can make a plane from pretty
          > much any hardwood that you wish, there are historical examples for a
          > number of different woods.  In Europe beech was common and not a
          > furniture wood, also it happens to have lots of other good properties that
          > make is a good tool wood.  I forget which modern wood plane maker
          > builds most of his with Cherry because he can source blocks of it.

           
          >
          >
          > I got a nice turning block of Ash that was perfectly cut for
          > plane making, so when I get up the energy I'm going to cut the mortice
          > fully by hand ...
          >

          I did that--built a monster jointer copying the one in Bourdichon's shop
          painting of about 1500. I used local ash from a hardwood dealer here in
          Oregon, and it's been quite stable since. The largest offcut made a vise
          jaw for my portable bench.

          Ash was definitely used for planes in period, too--one of the _Mary Rose_
          planes was made of ash, and oak was commoner than beech.

          Ulfhedinn
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